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Q&A with Ron D. Moore


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#621 seanormond00

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Posted 24 March 2009 - 12:04 PM

You all do know that this post was for a Q and A from 2 years ago right?
these questions, no matter how good they are, are not going to be answered from this topics Q and A.
I hope he has another one, seems like he owes it to us weather you loved or hated the finale.

#622 ochreluna13

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Posted 24 March 2009 - 12:11 PM

QUOTE (seanormond00 @ Mar 24 2009, 12:04 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
You all do know that this post was for a Q and A from 2 years ago right?
these questions, no matter how good they are, are not going to be answered from this topics Q and A.
I hope he has another one, seems like he owes it to us weather you loved or hated the finale.

I know, I just figured, what the he ll...
were: "...I started to realise that luna's posts were more zombieish and analytical that usual.... Thats what tipped me off!!!"

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Send me changing table locations...

#623 seanormond00

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Posted 24 March 2009 - 12:15 PM

I have recently re listened to the round table pod cast. I really enjoy that one. even if we dont get another Q and A session. I would love a cast round table podcast so they can all talk about their feelings or comments now that the show is over.

#624 sartoris

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Posted 24 March 2009 - 12:56 PM

QUOTE (ochreluna13 @ Mar 24 2009, 12:11 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I know, I just figured, what the he ll...



Exactly. After listening to the podcast on the Daniel issue, I strongly suspected that RDM was about the screw the pooch in the finale, and then after witnessing it this thread was as good a chance as any to simply say "what the frakk?"


#625 Muldfeld

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 01:52 AM

Mr. Moore, I loved the expressionistic quality of the finale, especially the flashback stuff that had so much wonderful texture missing this season. However, I really have a major problem with the show's final political message of warning about creating artificial intelligence rather than the show's far more insightful notions about the cycle of human violence. One need look no further than the man who popularized the fear of machines turning against us than James Cameron who recently spoke to Sci Fi Wire:
http://scifiwire.com...meron-remin.php

The piece's most interesting parts: Cameron said, "I've been fascinated ever since by our human propensity for dancing on the edge of the apocalypse," Cameron writes. "So when I wrote the first Terminator outline around 1982, I was just working out my childhood stuff. It was also born out of the science fiction movies and literature I grew up with. For the most part, they were warnings—about technology, about science, about the military and the government. You couldn't escape those themes or the fear of nuclear holocaust."...

Cameron adds that he doesn't really believe that there will come a war by machines to wipe out humanity in the next generation. 'The stories function more on a symbolic level, and that's why people key into them,' he says. 'They're about us fighting our own tendency toward dehumanization.'"

Irony of ironies, Mr. Moore. You're show was able to avoid the clunky symbolism of most sci fi, and actually subtly delve into the dehumanization and homogenization of "the other", which is a far more vital message humans must learn since we've rarely broken that cycle, rather than worrying about AI, don't you think? What a wasted opportunity!
"I thought if I could get over her, I could get over anything. I could endure, conquer, be a man, stand up to any and all kind of punishment. I clung to an empty, spinning bed for months. And that -- that -- is when I finally realized how much I loved her. If I needed all that strength, what was the point? I needed to be with her."
Romo Lamkin, Battlestar Galactica, "The Son Also Rises", March, 2007

"I just want to sit here and die."
Gaius Baltar, Battlestar Galactica, "Exodus II", October, 2006.

You are my center when I spin away
Out of control on videotape
This is my way of saying "good-bye"
'cause I can't do it face to face
I'm talking to you when it's too late
From my videotape

-"Videotape" by Radiohead

#626 Muldfeld

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Posted 27 March 2009 - 06:15 AM

Dear Ron, here's my comments from fall 2006-2007, which were erased when the BSG message board was revamped and the old Q&A thread deleted. I bet you're thankful I saved 'em, eh?! When you have the time, Mr. Moore. They're from a time when I was badly injured and didn't know when or if I would recuperate because of incompetent doctors and their tendency to rush through patients as quickly as possible without actually helping them. Anyway, I'm mostly better now, though scared from the experience. Enjoy!

Oct. 26, 2006 6:20 pm (page 39)

Dear Ron Moore,

I have watched your work since I was 9 in 1989, and came to really enjoy it on DS9, which is the only Star Trek I really treasure still. I just wanted to thank you for questioning American preconceptions about terrorism. I think you've done something truly amazing with your program and that is to create characters that are very real in that they are all commit terrible mistakes and, sometimes, crimes. In any case, I was very proud of this show's 3rd Season Premiere, which correctly implied that war and terrorism are not that different; both are violent means to achieve political or strategic ends, and neither are really superior to the other. That war is dignified and terrorism morally cowardly are major failures of understanding in the West -- both about the intent of intimidation behind terrorism (in which the US and Israel, among many other states, partake) and the scale of power of the actors (which have included American Revolutionary conscripts and the French Resistance in WWII). The understanding you help put forth about the nature and causes of terrorism, but also about human nature (religion, nationalism, war, political mechanics in a democracy or dictatorship or regimes in-between) may help us find a better future; I see that these are themes that were explored by Ira Behr, you and the others in some of DS9's finest, and you are simply refining that exploration to greater artistic effect. I sincerely believe that if more people internalized what your show is saying then all peoples might better manage to live together. Below is a letter I sent to John McCain, which carefully (I hope!) explains my concerns about the Lebanon Crisis; it's long, but it's a carefully laid-out rationale that I worked out over the summer, and I thought it easier than retyping my views here. I hope you have the time at some point to read or at least skim through it. Thank you.

Dear Senator McCain,
I first became aware of you during a Charlie Rose interview in the late '90s. I was touched by your statement that you would like to do more for native Americans. I had never heard a US politician talk like that -- let alone a Republican. I had just watched a documentary about how Jack Abramoff swindled natives of their land in exchange for letting them meet Bill Clinton, so I was not unaware of Democrats'insensitivity on the issue. I assume your statement had to do with a deep regret that you possess about the injustice done to them, and that, although you took no part in their slaughter, you feel it the responsibility of society to deal with the legacy of our predecessors' sins.

I've watched you for years, and have grown disheartened by your virulent support of Israel, since the same misfortunes and brutality that were visited upon the native Americans have been visited upon Palestinians since the late '40s.

I've watched you on numerous talk shows and I cannot understand why you are misrepresenting the situation between Lebanon and Israel. On the Tonight Show, you said that Israel's acts are morally more justifiable because the civilians aren't the targets. While that remains to be proven, at the center of the position is the bias that when states engage in violence called "war", it is justificable, whereas when poorer groups engage in it, it is called "terrorism" and seen as depraved. Terrorism is just a means and, while terrible, it is not morally worse than war. The morality of the act depends on the goals and the targets, not the means.

If you oppose terrorism, you should similarly oppose war. After all, there are examples of each that are deplorable -- most obvious being Nazi Germany's attack on Western Europe and Al Qaeda and similar groups' attack on, well, almost everyone. However, have you ever thought that the way those French citizens rebelled against Vichy France or those in Germany who sought to assasinate Hitler were engaging in terrorism?

Perhaps, to drive the point most strongly, what about how American Revolutionary soldiers fought in the South against the "civilized" British army. Nathaniel Greene led them in guerilla tactics by engaging in hit and run attacks, often disguised as civilians, hidden in towns. They shocked British troops in refusing to stand still and fight in honorable fashion. They would hide in trees and shoot at British soldiers without announcing their presense, let alone allow the British to prepare for battle, according to the customs of warfare. They spread propaganda to win over undecided towns about Native American tribes allied with the British who raped and killed white women, when none of this was true. Based on present-day American logic, over two hundred years ago, American Revolutionary soldiers were terrorists against the British Empire, and had no qualms about doing whatever it took to win. Asymmetrical warfare breeds asymmetrical rules of fighting. Terrorism is just the poor man's weapon against a state that uses other means to oppress, such as laws and the ability to bring overwhelming force.

What you are ignoring, Senator McCain, is that the US sides with Israel because it has done so since the start of the Cold War in a bid to challenge the Soviet presense there and due to the Jewish American electorate. Against George Marshall's vehement opposition, Harry Truman helped create a Jewish nationalist state in 1948, which, in turn, used terrorist tactics to force Palestinians to evacuate their homes and to attack UN observers. It is an undeniable fact of history that Israel was founded by terrorism and ethnic cleansing; they forced Palestinian Muslims to leave their homes, either through deliberate use of violence or through the threat of its use. Israel has also been allowed (thanks to a sabotaging of the Security Council by the US over and over) to settle disputed lands with religious zealots. "Settler" is a convenient euphemism for "colonizer", like the kinds of people who colonized land by attacking Native Americans and then decried the cruelty of raiding tribes. Do you find greater fault with native tribes attacking white settlers than those who used their might to displace them in the first place?

I don't deny the idiocy and racism of many Arab states, but why should the Palestinian and now Lebanese people pay for their actions and those of terrorist groups?

In seeing things in a black and white dimension, most US politicians have failed to realize or admit that allowing the occupation of Palestine for decades by an Israeli government, which has flouted numerous UN resolutions since its inception (nevermind the one that Lebanon is ignoring) has only created conditions for terrorism to run rampant. Hezbollah didn't exist until Israel invaded. We need to understand that the goals of these Israeli occupation-inspired groups are very much practical and not very religious, let alone fundamentalist. They don't "hate our freedoms"; they want what Israel has denied them for so long -- to get back the land taken from them, and live decent lives.

At the same time, oppressed people can take twisted paths if they are desperate enough. Russia's refusal throughout the '90s to allow Chechnya's rightful independence after decades of oppression by the USSR and Tsarist Russia has led to some depraved acts by terrorists. While a more tempered agreement could have been reached earlier, Russia's brutal mistreatment of Chechens led to the hostage-taking of Russian school children. This was a terrible thing, but, in some ways, the Russian government and its people pushed Chechens to the edge enough that some of them thought this was acceptable. Similarly, Hamas and Hezbollah find support among inhabitants for their horrific acts.
Just like war, all terrorisms' goals are different. Hamas and Hezbollah are national movements that seek to overthrow their occupiers. They may speak hyperbolically about destroying Israel but I believe that is only to win support and because peace is so far off. Revolutions tend to moderate themselves once they gain responsibility. While there may be some funding from Iran and Syria, this is not less fair than a US government that has funded Israel, provided weapons, and allowed that state to have nuclear weapons since the 1970s. American officials and pundits should not soothe their consciences about allowing the slaughter to take place for several weeks because there is an international conspiracy occurring. Most of the people who have died have done nothing to Israel, and have had very little democratic control of their nations for long if at all.

I used to support America's behavior in the Vietnam War until I actually did some research. During that war, Americans killed many Vietnamese who fought for their independence under the guise of stopping the domino effect of Communism. They even supported a brutal government in the South, which they called "democratic" that had little popular support. What they misunderstood is that even if Moscow and Beijing wanted a Communist Vietnam, there were good grassroots reasons for the Vietnamese wanting the French and Americans out. A brilliant man, Ho Chi Minh asked for self-determination at the Paris Peace Conference after World War I. He begged for American aid from Truman after World War II; he was even willing to accept an American presence if it meant ridding Vietnam of France's brutal colonialism. Still, America ignored his calls, until Ho eagerly sought Moscow's financial aid and US officials began fearing the spectre of Communism.
How many devastated towns, torn limbs, and deaths were allowed in Vietnam due to ideological misunderstandings. How many children are still born today in the region with birth defects all because the US considered use of Agent Orange to allow acceptable casualties, when they never would have subjected their own citizens to that kind of risk? Perhaps Communism wasn't the way to go for Vietnam's economic well-being, but with no-one to turn toward, how can we blame their path in retrospect? I know that you have personally suffered torture at the hands of the VietCong, but can you honestly say that the Vietnamese are evil or incapable of peaceful coexistence or was it that the war forced both sides to do terrible things? And, in retrospect, weren't the VC less "evil" and the Saigon government less admirable than Americans thought at the time?

Similarly, America's alliance with Israel dates back to the Cold War but also to a somewhat understandable bias among many Jewish American voters. Most voters of certain ethnic backgrounds are going to have a bias, including Muslim Americans, but our elected officials and the rest of the voters have to be responsible enough to think about the national and world interests. During the First World War, one senator stated that the German Kaiser was a friend of his -- all to garner support among German-Americans in the mid-West.

Traditionally the Republican party was more even-handed in dealings with Israel with George H. W. Bush's Secy of State James Baker being unfairly called antisemitic at one time by Israeli officials. The Democratic party has traditionally been pro-Israel because that's where the votes have been. In the last few decades, Israel has become a natural ally and Arabs and Muslims have become more natually inimical toward the US; for its part, Iran's Revolution was an irrational reaction to US officials tampering in the region by installing the Shah. The US also aided Saddam Hussein's regime to wage war and provided it chemical weapons to attack Iran for 8 years. Still, Iran's young people stood fast with the US after 9/11, but Bush's "Axis of Evil" speech unnecessarily made them uneasy and the invasion of Iraq sent the message that the US will invade unless you can protect yourself. Thus, we have an idiot of a president in Iran, but the public is not in full support of nuclear weapons and may remove him if Iran is given space and time. Except for some deplorable words about the Jewish people's experiences during the Holocaust, for which he should apologize, President Ahmadinejad seemed to make perfect sense in last night's 60 Minutes interview.

Just as the rest of the world should be forgiving of America's irrational behavior after 9/11 and its invasion of Iraq and Israel's attrocities, so should they be forgiving of the numerous mistakes of much poorer Arabs and Muslims. People are not destined to be terrorists, but if they feel there is no option, many may; some may even join brutal groups like Al Qaeda. Just with respect to national interests, America will know no peace if it continues to support Israel in this way; the double standard is obvious to every media outside of America; just check out the BBC World News or Canada's CBC, let alone Arab media. I think an important approach to understanding people the world over is to imagine how different your life, culture and outlook would be if you were in another's position. We need to be fair to one another if we are going to stem the tide of irrationally-based terrorims, and achieve world peace, but we in democracies HAVE TO force our leaders (in your case, your peers) to do so.... or we will ALL die.
Thanks for reading.

2nd post Oct. 26th 7:17 pm (page 40)
Based on a disappointing conclusion to occupation, David Weddle and Bradley Thompson's work needs serious rewrites because it's hurting the show!

I'm sorry to sound so mean; I know they worked with you on DS9 ever since they wrote some book I think Ira Behr liked (I own the DS9 Companion guide), but their work has almost consistently been the worst across both shows; the incredible "Downloaded" last season was the exception. They wrote the worst episode of the 6 episode arc that started Season 6 and the worst episode of the 10 part story that ended the series, while you and Ira wrote the best: "Tacking into the Wind" and "What You Leave Behind", and now they have written the worst episodes of this arc, which began at the end of last season.

I've felt this way for a while. Whenever I see their names, I can expect lots of action-oriented scenes and weaker than usual dialogue and drama that doesn't quite achieve the perfection I saw in rewatching the miniseries, "33" and especially "Water". Let me just explain my problem with the episodes this season after your amazingly powerful season premiere.

I thought "Exodus part 1" was alright, but nothing compared with the best of the show or the season premiere. Even though you do a rewrite, I wonder if you might be less likely to be as critical of them due to your history together; if this is the case, I don't think it's intentional, but just a natural reaction to be more critical of the work of a newcomer than a colleague. In any case, there were some great scenes, like the one with Baltar and Caprica 6, and it's still a good piece of writing -- sort of a U2's "Rattle and Hum" after "The Joshua Tree", if you will. I had the same feeling about their writing at the start of Season 2 and the awful "Scar". Their writing always evokes a slightly cheesy militaristic bravado that goes over the top, and things sometimes get way too notalgic with some overly flowery rhetoric. It's in the too easy triumphalism when the Chief saves Roslin and company, and announces Adama is on the way; it's in the ceremonies in Exodus 1, the cheering up by Dualla to Lee at the start of Exodus 2, and in most scenes in Season 2, in which Starbuck acts extra gung ho. I think these are realistic elements in a military group, but there's a subtlety that's missing that you are often able to bring to the fore. There was also a needless extra few minutes that were replayed at the start of "Exodus 1" from "Precipice" which seemed a bit unnecessary since "Exodus 2" seemed very rushed due to time constraints.

I thought "Exodus 2"'s plot was very good, which was the tragedy of this arc. So often multiple-part arcs and 2-parters, especially on TNG, but not DS9, are afflicted with poor plotting for the conclusion. In this case, the plot was fine; it was in the finer details that things needed work, perhaps a lighter, more artistic touch. The episode was somehow predictable in places, which is striking for a show that has made an art out of defying expectations and cliche. I knew Lee would come to save his father in the Pegasus but this was understandable because how else would things be resolved. Yet, I also knew Kara would stab Leoben, and that Gaeta wouldn't shoot Baltar. These were still tense moments, and did have me praying a bit that characters didn't die, though, but part of me knew things would be alright. Ellen Tigh's death was particularly unexpected and had me grieving slightly in denial days after. I think it needs to be explained why they killed her if the evacuation was under way. Couldn't they have kept her under guard or handcuffed to Saul, or was it still too risky. Or was it just a matter of punishment for the sake of justice. Either way, I was really sad to see her go.

Aside from that scene which would have had a great impact no matter who wrote it, I didn't think the episode's drama and especially the dialogue were as strong as they could have been in the hands of the other writers; you come to mind, but also the amazing Toni Graphia and Anne Cofell Saunders who have done some amazing work. Again, it was a really good episode with some definite surprises, but it just wasn't as honed as it could have been. The drama and dialogue could have been EVEN better. There weren't any of those themes that really make me think about our reality and help me look at it in a whole new way. Almost every episode in the first and best season had moments like that. This had almost none. In this sense, an incredible opportunity was lost to really explore the occupation and its dramatic circumstances in even greater detail.

By the way, I've been campaigning for this show on a U2 fan site's message board, and begging Charlie Rose to interview you, in addition to Radiohead and the Cure. I've been telling everyone I know to try out this show. I think it has transformational power to change the way society functions. It can be a powerful eductational tool that could help societies understand human nature better. This is the first show, of which I am aware to portray heroes as flawed in major ways and show the humanity in villains. I think one of the problems in our culture is that our heroes are mythologized to the extent that flaws are dismissed. The Founding Fathers or the numerous depictions of US presidents in hagiographic biographies by celebrity historians come to mind. So, we don't recognize how terrible people on "our side" can be or how decent those on the other side are. For this gift from you and your writers, I am grateful.

Dec. 19, 2006. 2:42 pm (page 46)

Dear Mr. Moore and company,

My comments here are regarding "The Passage" written by Jane Espenson. I might have written sooner, but I've been suffering from a medical injury and am taking the opportunity from temporary absense of pain which prevents me from sitting to write to you standing up.

I enjoyed Jane Espenson's work on Buffy, and especially her DS9 episode, though I have no idea to what degree she wrote it besides just providing the plot.

Anyway, I was very disappointed in the episode for its overreliance on guilt as the dramatic motivator, which resulted in a "Lost"-like episode that was very predictable. I have had to work on myself psychologically quite a bit in the last few years, and one of the things I have learned is how useless guilt is -- how it serves no other purpose than to punish the alleged guilty and helps no one. Guilt doesn't really help anyone. I used to think heroes felt guilty for everything; this was very much the basis of writing on enjoyably funny, though inferior shows like Buffy and Angel. Even Chris Carter's amazing first season of Millennium was reduced to morally simple drama of characters who felt they had to sacrifice and feel gulity all the time in Season 2, when the childish Glen Moran and James Wong took over and melodramatically destroyed a subtle and complex and mysterious show.

One of the things I love about your show is its realness. I was worried that "Hero" would only be about guilt, until the President partially rectifies Adama's thinking. I was especially heartened by Athena's comments to Adm. Adama at the start of Season 3 about how her guilt was holding her back.

My problem with "The Passage", except for some touching scenes at the end, was that it killed off a perfectly good character for reasons that should have been obvious to the audience (they were to me) were baseless. The whole story was predictable from the start. She had a dark past and, because she mistakenly thought she had to make up for it by risking her life, she would pay for it. Watching the story, I knew that Kat being a drug smuggler was made up for by her heroism in past episodes. Also, ignored by Starbuck's unnecessary cruelty, was how the environment of life's options can make it far more likely for people to do "bad" things. Her death was unnecessary and could have been saved for a more convincing story. It just seemed unnecessary and -- based on my addiction to trying to be like my TV characters in my teens and now early adulthood due to low self-esteem -- seems dangerous. It informs the public that heroes feel guilty and you can only erase the guilt by sacrificing yourself. Doing the right or noble thing becomes equated with endless sacrifice -- with deprivation and thrift and self-punishment and a whole slew of negative values from which I and many people have suffered in a misguided pursuit of happiness or at least God or society's love.

Anyway, "Unfinished Business" gladly showed some drama from New Caprica, which I'd hoped Season 3 would focus upon longer. Also, Eye of Jupiter was pretty cool, though I would have liked more scenes with Baltar and please don't kill of Tyrol because he's a rich and wonderful character. Maybe Racetrack or Dee.

I also read in an article on syfyportal.com that Ms. Espenson would like to inject some comedy into the show. While I think the over-the-top out-of-context humor of Buffy and Angel would not be a good idea, I do think it might be nice to have again those moments of levity Baltar brought in Season 1. Based on your amazing work on DS9 on incredible episodes like "In the Cards" and "Looking for Par Mach in All the Wrong Places", you have a great sense of humor, as did the amazing Ira Steven Behr. So, this show is in good hands.

Jan 24, 2007 4:35 pm (page 48)

I was a bit disappointed, but "The Rapture" was written by the action-oriented Weddle and Thompson, so I didn't expect the best dialogue. Still, the ending was great, and I especially loved the political exploration and comparisons for our own times toward the end.

Fundamentalist evangelists in America are often seen as obeying scripture strictly and being dogmatic and unquestioning of faith. Their views have led to support of Israel due to end-of-times prophesy and helped support a president, who sees the world in hierarchy and personal entitlement. How interesting for the writers to twist things in Cavil's last statement to D'Anna by having him accuse her religious zeal, which actually questions faith and the role Cylons are to have, as leading to a self-righteous mission that has led to chaos. Fascinating!

This is the greatest show on television and I've been telling everyone I know to watch it, but what the show really needs are some more scripts by you because they tend to be the best, especially work like "Water" and the thought-provoking "Occupation/Precipice". Nothing beats Season One for me in terms of subtelty and dialogue, but keep doing what you're doing. I'm excited. Also, Leoben was so incredible in that Season One episode; I hope you haven't forgotten him.

Please don't kill Baltar......

If you must kill someone, let it be Dualla or Helo or Cally (who hasn't really done much besides be behind the Chief as the supportive wife) or Anders.

Jan 30, 2007 4:45 pm

I just wanted to add my voice to the chorus for a new theme piece. I really loved the Season 1 theme -- far more than the Season 2 one.

Also, I was reading some sci fi site, and lots of people seem to dislike "Unfinished Business" and "Takin'a Break From All Your Worries". I just wanted to say that I loved these two episodes, and I much prefer this kind of drama to shoot outs and explosions. I never expected Gaeta to attack Baltar. I fully expected, based on his past behavior of doing the right thing and even sparing Baltar's life in Exodus 2, that he would defend him at some trial, telling everyone that he allowed the humans to get off New Caprica safely. However, this new turn makes perfect dramatic sense, since Gaeta wishes to dissociate himself from being a collaborator and is ashamed of any part he played.

I was thinking about how many early Irish immigrants to America were often grouped with blacks at work as a socially-excluded class. Sometimes they were even more racist toward blacks because psychologically they didn't want to be associated with them and wanted to be part of mainstream white America. As a South Asian Muslim immigrant, even though I've been in North America since I was two, I understand this deeply rooted desire to be accepted into the mainstream -- almost to the point of hating associations people might make with my geographical and religious origins, often resenting being part of those ethnic categories. It's hard to get over, and the problem is not really to do with the "mainstream" as my own insecurities.

Anyway, Gaeta doesn't want to be -- or think of himself as -- anything like Baltar. Wonderful!

I was also shocked to see the 6 in Baltar's mind making fun of Baltar while he was under interrogation and being disgusted instead of helping him endure and giving him moral support as she had so far this year. Is she a demon, indeed?

Feb 14, 2007 2:00 am (page 50)

I was just listening to the podcast, and I was sadened to learn that any reference to Helo trying to be a hero to gain back his status was omitted. I don't think it would have taken much time to spell out (just a reference by Tigh and others to Adama), but -- just like Dr. Cottle lying to Helo about having done the autopsy -- it would have added a whole other texture and realism, which I think Helo lacks. He's become the Lee Adama of Season 1, minus the violent edge. By having him be a bit racist at the start of the ep, it made him more realistic. By having the story reference this aspect of Helo's attempts at heroism, it adds a greater realism and takes away nicely from him being too perfect, and makes his heroism a bit more ego-centric.

Also, I"m worried about these deleted scenes appearing at the end of eps, though I don't see them in Canada. I'm afraid that it will take away impetus to put such great ideas in future stories. I fear rationalizations of ""people have already seen it in a deleted scene, so why do it in a show". Please don't let this happen. I want to watch the next episodes as though I have no idea as an audience member that Roslin made some kind of deal with Caprica 6 or that Helo has confessed to Adm. Adama; if it is assumed to have happened, it should be explained anew.

Feb. 22, 2007 1:37 am (page 50)

I wanted to make a few comments concerning last week’s excellent episode, the DVDs, and some comments from the audio commentaries.

The episode in which Adama celebrates his wedding anniversary is the second best episode of the season – right after the amazing “Occupation”/”Precipice”. I seem to be the only one on these boards who didn't think it all that odd that Adama imagines advice from a woman he no longer sees, as I sometimes do the same thing: we think about what went wrong in past relationships and what to correct for future ones and we sometimes think about those missing from our lives and what they might say in dire times of worry or panic; I think it's a gutsy move for Mark Verheiden to admit that we sometimes do this, even though many might call us crazy. This episode had much of the texture and character moments (especially with father and son, which reminded me a bit of my brothers' and my relationship to our own father) missing from much of this and last season and it reminded me of Season 1; Helo’s comment to Hotdog was hilarious. The only minor complaint I have is that Roslin tends to overdo her excitement when laughing with Adama. Listening to the commentary for “Lay Down Your Burdens” part 1, I have to agree with David Eick’s sentiments about not liking Laura’s similarly silly behavior in losing her balance and bending over with laughter. There seems no midpoint to her transition from quiet seriousness to outright giddiness and keeling over; I can understand laughing, but she seems too overjoyed with Adama sometimes. Then again, you the writers and the actor herself, probably have a better sense of how she behaves than I do, and maybe it’s something characteristically odd with the character that I’ll have to get used to – just like Kira Nerys’ cackle.

Regarding the DVDs, I’ve noticed an unnecessary defect on Seasons 2.0 and 2.5 that never occur on my Fox or Paramount DVDs (The X-Files, Millennium, Deep Space Nine, The 4400, etc). There are pauses on at least a couple of the episodes during which the picture and sound freeze for a short while, but which also result in a lapse (loss of a few words) in the audio commentary accompanying the episodes. The two I’ve noticed are during “Home” part 2 at 10:47, when Mind 6 is suddenly clothed in athletic wear and during “Lay Down Your Burdens” part 2 at 9:09, when Roslin is seated in her chair. While I understand that this happens with content that spans more than half the DVD, as with movies or this show’s miniseries, it is absolutely unnecessary for episodes less than an hour and a half; this is probably because the usual practice is to have the pause at the start of the 3rd 45 minute episode so that it’s unnoticeable. I know that all this sounds a bit fussy, but y’all fuss over matters far less noticeable than this, and, if it’s avoidable, why not rectify it? And I pay good money for these DVD sets, too. Anyway, since you’re the head honcho, I thought to whom better to bring up such a complaint.

In the last few months, somewhat immobilized due to a medical injury (and, by the way, just like a tortured Baltar before I even watched "A Measure of Salvation", I also conjured up the image of a woman I miss to get through some very bad pain), I’ve very much enjoyed the audio commentaries on the DVDs, and I had a few comments regarding what you and your wife said. Your comments during “Lay Down Your Burdens” 2 about people voting their hopes and not their fears also struck me as odd when originally aired because it reminded me of Nixon’s statement (I remember from an “American Experience” documentary) that “people vote out of fear, not love; they don’t teach you that in Sunday School, but it’s true.” I would very much like to agree with you, though, and I’m reassured by the fact that Nixon’s "wisdom" (really his cynicism) also reflected his insecurities and led to his downfall, though JFK was perhaps just as underhanded (auditing Nixon 3 times) and cynical, if not in public pronouncements, then in actual policy at home and in his militancy toward the Communist powers. It’s easier to base projections of human behavior on the bottom line, much like the exploitative MTV or Karl Rove, and not be disappointed if you never ask people to rise to the occasion. I also agree with Mrs. Ron that Reagan’s politics were much less about real hope than cheap nationalism and angry militancy in which everyone in the world outside the white middle class (or richer) in America was excluded.

Also, I was sure, as I told a friend, upon watching the extended edition of “Pegasus” that Adm. Kain’s desire to hold standing meetings was based (as I heard on Frontline) on Rumsfeld working at a standing desk for 8 hours a day, leading to his policy that claimed forcing prisoners to stand wasn’t torture. I guess John Bolton was close enough. I hope I’m not wrong in that Abu Graib, among other historic issues, inspired "Pegasus." I was so proud when I saw this episode. It, among many other episodes, should have easily won an Emmy.

Thanks for reading.

Feb 26, 2007 3:58 am (page 50)

Just wanted to say what a great episode today's was (Baltar as Karl Marx; I never expected it!), and how thankful I am that you tried to make it relevant to our societies. Most shows would never write about this stuff, but it was fantastic. The only quibble I have was with the somewhat easy ending, but that's hard to do with only so much time. Perhaps it's that I expected Roslin to be stubborn, when in fact she showed the lesson perhaps all democracies should that, to avoid strikes, governments should be fair in spreading the costs of society evenly. And what a wonderful turn for Baltar! Thank you so much. I'm glad that Jane Espenson has co-written a great ep, since I wasn't too happy with The Passage. I was so worried that having so many episodes was the problem but this second set of eps seems, apart from the amazing Occupation/Precipice, to be more textured and dramtically-satisfying than the first, somewhat rushed half. I'm so glad, and I hope this show gets an order for 22 or for however many you feel comfortable.

This is a great drama and I think the only way to get people to give this a chance is to not dumb down the advertizing as US viewers complained about and I've seen on youtube. The music of the awful Nickelback would never have persuaded me this was a serious drama. Perhaps the strategy should be to persuade on an intelligent basis to watch (I will admit that I was immediately drawn to Number 6 when a friend showed me a downloaded episode), and not just based on typical sci fi standards; I grew up loving Star Trek, TNG, especially DS9 to this day, The X-Files, and the 4400, and even I'm skeptical about watching a show just because it's sci fi because the vast majority of it is trash.

I would love it if you'd give us all some tips on how best to get the word out to influence the Emmy judging panel or TV show critics or people who speak to the public. Maybe I should try to e-mail Oprah. I emailed Richard Roeper and got the lead guy of Mogwai to buy the DVDs, and my message explaining how politically-insightful your show is was forwarded to Charlie Rose for him to read. I don't know what else to do, and I don't want this show to get cancelled.

Mar. 1, 2007 1:02 am (page 50)

Dear Ron,

I really think the show is being marketed incorrectly and perhaps these concerns are more efficiently addressed by you directly with Universal and the network.
This is part of a message I sent to Universal, hinting that, based on the ads, the non-sci-fi viewer would have any idea what differentiates this from, say, seeing 7 of 9 on a Star Trek: Voyager ad or Nicolette Sheridan on a Desperate Housewives ad, for that matter; perhaps they checked out Voyager, but had sworn off sci-fi ever since; they need extra incentive, and not just sexy stuff.

"If ratings are considered low, it is because it is not being marketed correctly. I am sure that, if the show were advertized (and not just on Sci Fi; that's what synergy's for) for what it were: smart, politically-insightful, dramatically realistic, and not just your average sci fi excitement, then it would do better. No intelligent person would ignore this show in favor of Lost or Grey's Anatomy. You are sitting on a gold mine that has been praised by The New York Times and the New Yorker; you might want to use those quotations in ads. It should be marketed based on its intelligent qualities because the average sci fi fan likes nonsense like Star Wars, and intelligent people who might not be into sci fi like great drama (which this is, but they don't know it), and this show is left advertized in a way that appeals to a demographic that doesn't sufficiently appreciate its depth, while the demographic that would appreciate it is left thinking that this is a superficial show, like all the other sci fi.

If you send DVD copies to reviewers like Roger Ebert or especially talk show hosts like Jay, Conan, Bill Maher and even CNN folks, this show will catch on! You just have to get people to give it a chance and it will garner popular acclaim like wildfire. I got a set for my brother and his wife, who are busy doctors, and they love it, bought the other DVDs, and have told their friends about it, and they, in turn, love it.

This brings me to another area in which the show is probably making a decent profit, DVDs and foreign markets. This show's success should be based on DVD sales, projected sales and foreign markets to which you sell the show. It's a huge hit on Canada's Space channel. All this should factor into your decisions. Imagine if Seinfeld had been cancelled, as many at NBC wanted to do, if someone hadn't had faith in it. What about The X-Files? Battlestar Galactica is different than both those shows in that the writing has been top notch and the characters developed from the start. All this show needs is more promotion because who else watches Sci Fi than sci fi fans.

This show is so much more than your usual sci fi. It's a political drama, and is the most important show ever because it's all about how we view ourselves and "the other" and about the political dilemmas democratic society faces. A show like this can change the course of history the way Bambi helped start the environmental movement and Star Trek helped inspire blacks in the '60s. I believe in the intelligence of this show, and so should you market it as such so that others will.

Thanks for your time and for making this incredible show."

I know I might sound like I have no life sometimes or that I expose myself too much, but, you share so much of your concerns in your art (as I've recently been reading in those AOL DS9 Q & A sessions I newly discovered on Trekweb.com) that I can't help but want to connect and show appreciation and solidarity. In the midst of this world that seems like it's falling apart and with privileged people like those in the Bush administration not understanding the lessons of history -- or, worse yet, not caring -- with the hard and long work of humanitarians and environmentalists destroyed in an instant, I have felt a cynicism and sadness that I didn't feel in the '90s. I feel that this creation of yours offers us a way to help at least understand one another in ways we otherwise might not.

I don't know what to do to help this show, Mr. Moore. Please let me and others know.

Mar 5, 2007 12:49 am (page 51)

Another Thompson and Weddle flop just like "Rapture" and "Exodus" before it, which were still far better than most things on TV, and I did like their rewrite of the Philip Kim story for "Treachery, Faith, and the Great River", which was one of THE few best eps of Season 7 DS9; however, I hated every thing else they did on DS9. Though I loved the references to the cylon assertions of history repeating, the brilliant ending with Adama, and the scenes between Kara and her mom, I thought much of the episode lacked something I can't quite pinpoint; it just didn't feel complex enough in some way, not quite as moving. Some of the scenes with Kara being foreshaddowed something perhaps were stretched out, as perhaps were the cockpit scenes. I'm not sure what could have been done, but I wasn't too happy. The acting was great, as usual though. Then again, perhaps some of this was ruined by the fact that I stumble upon rumors even though I try like mad to avoid any spoilers on websites; I don't even watch the official previews. However, some website reporter speculated on rumors that Sakhoff was leaving and placed no warning so I didn't know it was essentially a spoiler.

Update: As I was sleeping last night and waking this morning (okay afternoon!), I started remembering moments and ideas in the ep, which made me very sad. Some of the plot was good, but the execution shows that you need to personally write more eps, especially the dialogue, even if I didn't like most of Season 2.0, including your ep with David Eick.

Update 2 (Tuesday evening): I rewatched the ep, and enjoyed it much more and found much of the texture for which I had been looking. Perhaps I prejudiced myself when I saw the names Thompson and Weddle, though I still think you might have written a better ep, and it wasn't as good as the writing in most of Season One, including the non-planet survace drama in "You Can't Go Home Again". Perhaps it was that I identified with Kara in being somewhat low in self-esteem and thinking I won't get to be happy at some subconscious level, no matter how much help I've tried to solicit in fighting it. In some way, she saw her destiny as committing suicide. It frightened me a bit because those thoughts aren't foreign to me and you killed a character who I wanted to see vindicated and find happiness with Lee, I suppose. However, that's probably less true to life and this decision was more artistic and realistic and that's why I love the show. She was always afraid she would just screw up his life, and I always understood that about her because I have those thoughts about my potential loved ones. I think what she did was very courageous since there was no point enduring even more unavoidable suffering in her life, and I hope she can finally find the peace she deserved. Also, another great dynamic for Lee's character to explore! I think he lied to Kara when he said he was happily married and he will always remember the woman he could have saved by making her and himself happier and allowing her to choose life.

Update 3:

QUOTE(hellboy70 @ Mar 6 2007, 06:34 PM)
I was quite surprised when he said kara's death was not a part of general BSG story arc, there was no plan for her to die before this ep. !! One day they came to studio and decide to kill premier character because they didn't not like current episode !? And it has nothing to do with general story arc whatsoever ??
It is irresponsible to the show and audience to kill of main character just for the sake of one episode, not even the whole episode but just to have more effective and shocking end. This was a bit cheap way to have more effective end. This is not 'desperate housewives' were they kill of character to raise ratings.
I mean what's next ,? Adama will die in sleep from a heart attack at the end of the next ep because it might be more interesting ending ?

Ditto. One thing I really respected about The X-Files as a whole is the writers usually killed off characters once they had served their purpose -- when they felt they had explored as many dynamics as they could.

It's perfectly plausible, based on realism, to kill off half the main BSG cast as well, because it's all about similarity to life. We the viewers are expected to mourn the inability to explore other aspects of Starbuck the same way someone who dies in real life has their bright future taken away as well.

However, it's the color of the characters and their uniqueness that make the show interesting. Killing off Crashdown was no biggie because he wasn't very interesting beyond the stiff and incompetent soldier. However, Tigh's wife and now Kara died for very little purpose, and their loss has lessened the show. I wouldn't mind if they killed Dualla, especially after the actress arrogantly said in an interview that she "couldn't be a cylon because then all the hot chicks on the show would be cylons." She's also not that interesting an actress or as a character beyond some supportive role. She was begging to be killed and Lee could have had a perfectly believable character dynamic in losing the wife who loved him and whom he never loved enough. This whole affair is very sad for the life of the show!

End update 3.

The season 3 DVD extras had better have an in-depth discussion with Katie Sackhoff -- much more than 10 minutes -- maybe 20 to 30.

By the way, Ron, I got so excited when I heard you and David Eick yesterday talking about the Lyndon Baines Johnson "American Experience" documentary during "Lay Down Your Burdens, part 2". In Grade 12, I taped that exact documentary from PBS in 1998, and I remember that moment, even though I haven't watched it since high school; historian Ronnie Dugger was talking about how he interviewed LBJ about that photo with the potentially stuffed box, and LBJ said nothing. I remember wishing it had been so much longer than the 4 hours David Grubin put together. I loved LBJ because my brother used to talk politics since I was 12. I used to try to get my friends in high school and even undergrad to watch it, but no one cared. I guess you would have. By the way, it was LBJ's first congressional election and he supposedly also helped JFK win by rigging some votes in Texas. Nixon didn't contest because he feared people on his side might have done the same thing. The American Experience on Douglas McArthur was pretty cool, too! It's a shame David McCullogh no longer does the narrating. He has such a great voice.

I even e-mailed Doris Kearns Goodwin (since she's a celebrity historian) about the show, as well as political talk shows, and stuff. I really think news and political people and historians would really appreciate what you and your staff have done here. One super famous left-leaning scholar -- who I thought might really appreciate what this show is doing in challenging some of the problems he criticizes about society academically -- was kind enough to answer but responded that he didn't have cable. I sometimes feel kinda nuts e-mailing all these people, but I think it's worth a shot, especially to save a show that is as important as I think it could be.

One question that I was pondering saving for some dream notion that I would motivate myself to actually write and even submit a spec script and then decided against that (so I'm not trying to take credit for this idea) is challenging the great man theory of history. The voters CHOSE Baltar, and despite his mistakes and deceptions, they have some role in causality that should be discussed. In a similary vein, Bush misled the US into war and Bush I and Clinton both brainwashed the people into thinking Saddam Hussein was as great threat to the US as KFC is to my health. However, in a democracy, people are part of the decision-making process. Many of those urging this war (including many pundits) have now turned and blamed the Bush administration as fully responsible, never caring to examine their convenient avoidance of warnings that this was unlikely to succeed, let alone be easy. Things frequently seem discussed at the level of leaders affecting a passive society, but what of the people's guilt in nationalistically supporting a war in Iraq or colonizing New Caprica against the warnings of Roslin? As you prepare to write Season 4, I think it's another level of realism you might consider tackling.

Mar 26. 2:29 am (page 54)

Regarding the finale, I liked some of the plot, but I was a bit disappointed in the focus on the whole music thing and some of the lack of texture. There should have been more dialogue and much more of the trial, which made the previous 2 eps and the use of Romo Lamkin so great to me. This one dragged a bit due to those music-related, cylon-revelation scenes, which didn't have the dramatic impact they should have, and the episode felt rushed in the more interesting areas. Also, the use of "All Along the Watchtower" was odd. I still have to rewatch the ep, but my immediate reaction was annoyance, especially since you didn't use the original, and I thought it made things look cheesy. However, maybe the use of a cover is to hide the time period of Earth, as if to allow for the possibility that it was a hundred years later that a cover band was doing a Dylan song, though I'm not sure that was the intended effect. Also, it made things sound cheesy, as though it were composed by a no-name band for TV -- something a teen turns on in her bedroom on a TV show when she's made at her parents.

I just wanted much more of the trial, Lamkin, and of Baltar and Caprica 6, though they were great as usual. I suppose you were subverting expectations by not having scenes with those two on the stand and their accompanying guardian angels. I sometimes think, though, that this undercuts the opportunity to take advantage of something unique in the show's life. Many scenes weren't as strong as in the last 2 episodes and even great work like "Dirty Hands" or "A Day in the Life". The scene between Roslin, Sharon and Caprica 6, for example, wasn't terribly interesting and felt rushed, as had much of "Exodus" and "The Eye of Jupiter"/"Rapture". Why not allow the episode to be longer, since more airtime was needed anyway, and give all these elements the dialogue and dramatic moments to breathe? I felt the focus was off for a finale, especially when "Lay Down Your Burdens" ranked with "Pegasus" as the most dramatically-satisfying as well as politically-insightful story to date. Now, those 2 might have been eclipsed by your stunning work on "Occupation"/"Precipice".

I think a lot of this season's weakness might have something to do with your not writing these stories from scratch, Mr. Moore. You only wrote 2 eps, at the start of the season, and those were the absolute best. Otherwise, you do a rewrite and I'm not sure you put as much effort into it, though I'm sure it's all difficult stressful work. That's why I think Exodus suffered in its rushed plot. (Why did they get off New Caprica so soon? There was so much drama that could have been milked from this experience, just as the arcs on DS9's 6th and 7th seasons did. Speaking of DS9, in your podcasts and discussions with others, could you please let them know you don't mean DS9 when you say "Star Trek", otherwise they won't check out this underappreciated show, of which I know you and Ira Behr are so proud.) I think once you start personally writing episodes again, the magic will come back. Season One eps like "Water" or "Kobol's Last Gleaming" have so much in the detailed execution of the plot that they transcend what they might have been accomplished if only rewritten by you. I can understand your decision to not write as many eps from scratch if you want more free time to enjoy your life and to spend on your responsibilites, but that's all the more reason to space the writing out more and take more time with both the creative decisions in the planning stage and in the details of dialogue and script. Perhaps, an altered filming schedule would allow Michael Rymer to do more work on the show since you favor his work, though I really like all the episodes on which Rod Hardy has worked, too.

Then again, arguably some of the best eps of the series, "Pegasus" and "Lay Down Your Burdens Part 2," were initially written by Anne Coffell Saunders with the latter cowritten by Mark Verheiden, who must have set a record for most episodes of any writer this season. Also, most of Season One was written by others but consistently acheieved near perfection. Maybe the magic of those 2 eps and most of Season One came from your rewrite and you just didn't do it to my satisfaction this time. Maybe Mr. Verheiden's magic was off. Maybe I'll think differently when I rewatch the ep.

I rewatched "Flight of the Phoenix" as well as "Resurrection Ship" and appreciated them much more, and I still actually enjoy "Black Market" for adding some grey to Lee, so thankfully rewatching hasn't made me appreciate things any less. I would say that, generally, deleted scenes should be inserted back into the show on the DVDs. The deleted scene from "Resurrection Ship" in which Lee confesses to Dee about the reasons for his depression was extremely enlightening about an aspect of the episode that was unclear to me when it originally aired. Similarly, the scene from "Taking a Break" in which Caprica 6 agrees to Roslin to testify against Baltar was important to understanding the "The Son Also Rises" scene in which Romo Lamkin questions 6, and something was lost in its exclusion. Also, please put back in the scenes in "Woman King" mentioning how Helo had been crying "Wolf" to consciously be seen as a hero to curry favor, as this would add so much realism and believable self-interest to his character. I'm sure getting Bear McCreary to compose some more music for those scenes wouldn't be too much work so they don't stick out so much during the episode.

Speaking of writers, I have always enjoyed Toni Graphia's and most of Jeff Vlaming's work. Will they come back? I've also very much enjoyed Michael Angeli and Michael Taylor's episodes this year. Darren Morgan -- not to be confused with his "Millennium"-ruining older brother, Glen -- added a certain flair for comedy with social insight during The X-Files. You might consider him, though he was not so good with deadlines.

What I loved:

I loved the very end (I'm so glad Starbuck's alive!), as well as the texture of Seelix being eager to see Anders and then quickly disappointed; I felt so bad for her. Also, Lee's great speech was not only dramatically enjoyable and tied together much of the season's theme of the politics of collaboration, but was true to life and how we approach justice in our own world; I know now why the actor was talking so insightfully in the roundtable discussion mp3 about how Roslin is the Mayoress of a closely-knit town and why Baltar is excluded; he had just been acting out those ideas. Stuff like this is what puts this so far beyond overhyped nonsense like "Lost," whose dramatic motivations feel contrived somehow, and whose use of guilt to define heroism is misleading and childish, I now realize. One of the things that makes this show so great is the ability to find new themes; the repetition of themes is what really killed The X-Files and most shows. There's so much you and your writers are able to find to talk about -- and the source of the real world sounds so simple, but it's brilliant and difficult. This season has made a step up to me from the last in at least one aspect: providing Lee and Tyrol with more drama, which was often sacrificed to give Starbuck more time, I think.

Please don't take any of this criticism as meanness or encouragement to end the show in Season 4. It's just that I've seen what the best of this show has to offer, and I feel some mistakes were perhaps due to unconscious carelessness since time should not have been a factor as the airdate was far off. I'm not one of those fans who thinks it's all about finding Earth or escaping the cylons. (Besides, I've felt for quite some time this show is about recognizing "the other" as human and questioning our own.) The X-Files wasn't about the intricacies of the conspiracy, but about loss, conflicted loyalties, faith, the politics of collaboration, and dramatic turns used to illustrate those issues, among others. This show shoots higher, but has had some problems concluding things dramatically -- almost as though the obession with going against expectations and cliche undercuts the drama so it sometimes feels anticlimactic and, at other times, overly triumphant during ceremonies and military promotions. To me, it's always been about exploring the human condition and enlightening debates about history and especially the current world political scene. As long as you do that well, I'm gonna fight for this show any way I pathetically can.

Helping this show to continue:
This show is incompetently advertized by Sci Fi and NBC Universal as sci fi with sexy people,and this kind of advertizing turns intelligent political people off and -- once the average sci fi fans watch the show -- the writing turns off sci fi fans who don't value the drama and political insight when things slow down. This is the most important show of our times and it can change the world. It's not too late to turn viewership up to Sci Fi's satisfaction, but it's going to take sending DVD sets to the right influential people (Roger Ebert and talk show hosts!) and advertizing this as the most politically-insightful show in the history of American popular culture. Politicians come and go and, even if they accomplish landmark objectives, those progressive achievements can be undone by someone like Bush, and that realization has just frightened me. Changing the culture is key. Smart people will like and appreciate what this show has had the creativity and guts to do, and I'm willing to fight for it. NBC Universal and Sci Fi network need to get on the ball and advertize this show for what it is -- not something that, based on the ads, looks like Star Trek Voyager or worse. With the ridiculous policies of this administration causing disillusionment, questioning Americans are ready for something like this that speaks to and hopefully enlightens them, as it has me.

Update: I just wanted to add that the scene in "The Son Also Rises" in which Romo talks about clinging to a bed for months and finding no point in going on without her if it required so much strength was the first time I've heard someone illustrate what I've been going through, and I wondered if I was the only one who spent their time like this and if there was something wrong with me. It's been two years, and I still sometimes cry myself to sleep. Thank you for that scene. One of the reasons I didn't post this earlier was I had been reading other peoples' posts, which often included spoiler info such as this one by nomad 421,

"I just watched this older TV Guide interview with KS (starbuck) and WOW... just WOW. The holy ***** moment for me was that in the interview, when she is asked if she can give out any secrets or info about season 3, she says "I'm a cylon, and I die". Then she goes on to say "I know, I'm a total spoiler and now nobody will watch,.... but, yea, I'm a cylon and I die, but you'll get to see how I die". This interview was filmed when she still had the long hair (from New Caprica)."

So you'll understand why it's sometimes hard participating on these boards because I've always liked surprises; I don't even watch the previews.

Also, my brother and sister-in-law are huge fans of the show (it's the only show they watch), but they DVR everything because they have babies and are busy so often. If this kind of technology is around and encouraged by the industry, Neilsen should take account of it affecting ratings. Not everyone's a luddite like me. I hate cellphones and mp3s, and still use a discman.


Ron Moore new questiosn, June 2007 page 4

Dear Ron,
My applause and criticisms are more fleshed out in your "blog questions thread", and I hope you read all of us there, but here are some of my concerns for my favorite show in years, with the more urgent questions placed higher up:

1. "It's the pacing and texture, stupid":
I just want to say your show amazes me in its ability to generate new, very dramatically-realistic and politically-insightful themes every season, while many shows suffer from the inability to generate new themes and dynamics to break the formula. It would be a shame if so rich a show were to end without even coming close to exhausting its creative potential.

I loved "Unfinished Business", "A Day in the Life" (not the Chief/Cally part), "Takin' A Break", and "Dirty Hands", which had a lot of texture. My view is the opposite of action-hungry fans seem to think this show would be better served if it came to an end quickly and see this past year's faults as due to meandering over "silly" things like drama and political insight, instead of the meaningless plot point of arriving at Earth -- the kinds of people who appreciate "Heroes," which is replete with plot points but empty on meaning and thematic innovation. I think everything was too rushed in the "main", action-oriented episodes (Exodus, Torn/A Measure of Salvation, Eye of Jupiter/Rapture, Crossroads 2), and there just wasn't enough elaboration and texture. I fear that rushing to an end will just cause more of these problems, as plotting and getting to the essence come at the expense of character moments, quirks, and even humor from Baltar and others that make this show so special and were aplenty (and not overdone) in Season 1, the first and last discs of Season 2.5 (which I much prefer to 2.0), the third season premiere, and some of the standalones in 3.5.

Perhaps as a result, some characters weren't really developed further or were given only tiny moments that needed elaboration: Caprica 6, Gaeta, Simon, Tom Zarek. At some level, this is understandable because Chief Tyrol and Lee Adama had much meatier roles throughout the season, compared to their less-satisfying roles in Season 2 (while Starbuck had a more prominent role), after such a presence in Season 1. All the more reason, then, to allow more episodes to fully say all there is to say about all your beautifully-acted characters, since they take turns in losing out at any given moment. Still, the aforementioned characters really need to be used as though they were full people and not just for plot turns in the larger lives of more prominent characters. Is there a sense that ending the series in 22 episodes could leave out an otherwise welcome opportunity to explore some of your fascinatingly complex characters further (especially since the actors put so much thought into their characters and probably have much to express about their created interpretations; you even agreed in the roundtable podcast with Jamie Bamber that the actors know the charcters better than you!) and leave room for more innovation of plot, political insight, and just more good story-telling?

2. Emergency episodes:
The extended version of Pegasus, the splitting of "Resurrection Ship" into 2 parts and the extra 20 minutes of "Lay Down Your Burdens part 2" all make the case that storytelling was sometimes best served by allowing for more time than was planned by network. Since such problems are likely to arise in the future, are you and Mr. Eick prepared to ask for and is the network prepared to grant even a few more hours to make the most of this final season -- to flesh out stories or allow innovative twists to have the greatest impact? Also, would you consider placing important deleted scenes -- especially the one hinting at the self-serving ambitions behind Helo's crying wolf in "Woman King" and Caprica 6's deal with Roslin in "Takin a Break" -- into the flow of the episodes (with music) on DVD, where there is no time limit, as well as Romo's new podcasts?

3. Efforts at drawing attention of intelligent non-sci fi fans to change the culture:
In your Blog Questions thread, I've explained in detail how ratings could improve if the show were advertized as politically-insightful and dramatically realistic and not the usual sci fi. I've been taping Season 1 episodes off TV on VHS to try to send to people of influence like Bill Moyers, Charlie Rose, and talk show hosts. Is this a waste of my time and futile?

4. The episodes you tend to write from scratch are usually amazing, except Home part 2. Seeing as "Occupation"/"Precipice" were the best episodes of Season 3, would you please consider writing way more episodes from scratch? Or maybe bring back Toni Graphia and Jeff Vlaming.

5. When Season 3 began (by the time most writing had finished for Season 3), you said you could do the show for another 2 years -- meaning until the end of Season 5. What made you change your mind? Was it really based on your doubts that the network might cancel the show with little notice after Season 4 (as some media sources indicate) or is this fully a creative decision?

6. Christopher Eric James
When I enjoy shows, I get very interested in who writes my favorite ones and sometimes look out for their work; it's why I watch The 4400, despite reservations, and why I was willing to check out Battlestar Galactica. Why does no one mention your co-writer for that amazing miniseries? What did he do in constructing the story or refining things? Is he just your imaginary friend?

7. DVD problems:
I found DVD mistakes, which I'd like to be corrected at least in HD DVD and prevented with future releases. I'd never watched the first season on TV until recently, and I noticed that on the DVD for the episode "You Can't Go Home Again", the second commercial break (fade to black) comes a few seconds too early. Cmdr. Adama yells that he won't give up the search for Starbuck and then tells Gaeta and Tight to "resume your duties"; on the DVD, the fade comes almost immediately. On TV, Adama exits the frame and we see Tigh's reaction of surprise.

Also, for the miniseries, the bridge between part 1 and 2 is a bit too quick as the mournful theme as Tigh pats Adama's back at the seeming death of Lee is quickly cut off due to the fade out from the TV footage. Instead the music should have been allowed to continue as Part 2's footage began.

I know these sound like minor things, but I'd like to have faith that the DVD footage is not being edited in any way from the TV footage unless it's to add more stuff, as with the extended version of Pegasus.

Additionally, I've noticed an unnecessary defect on Seasons 2.0 and 2.5 that never occur on my Fox or Paramount DVDs (The X-Files, Millennium, Deep Space Nine, The 4400, etc). There are pauses on at least a couple of the episodes during which the picture and sound freeze for a short while, but which also result in a lapse (loss of a few words) in the audio commentary accompanying the episodes. The two I've noticed are during "Home" part 2 at 10:47, when Mind 6 is suddenly clothed in athletic wear and during "Lay Down Your Burdens" part 2 at 9:09, when Roslin is seated in her chair. While I understand that this happens with content that spans more than half the DVD, as with movies or this show’s miniseries, it is absolutely unnecessary for episodes less than an hour and a half; this is probably because the usual practice is to have the pause at the start of the 3rd 45 minute episode so that it's noticeable. I know that all this sounds a bit fussy, but y'all fuss over matters far less noticeable than this, and, if it's avoidable, why not rectify it? And I pay good money for these DVD sets, too. Anyway, since you're the head honcho, I thought to whom better to bring up such a complaint.
"I thought if I could get over her, I could get over anything. I could endure, conquer, be a man, stand up to any and all kind of punishment. I clung to an empty, spinning bed for months. And that -- that -- is when I finally realized how much I loved her. If I needed all that strength, what was the point? I needed to be with her."
Romo Lamkin, Battlestar Galactica, "The Son Also Rises", March, 2007

"I just want to sit here and die."
Gaius Baltar, Battlestar Galactica, "Exodus II", October, 2006.

You are my center when I spin away
Out of control on videotape
This is my way of saying "good-bye"
'cause I can't do it face to face
I'm talking to you when it's too late
From my videotape

-"Videotape" by Radiohead

#627 Gunbunny

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Posted 04 April 2009 - 03:45 AM

I apologize, I'm Bored BORED BORED!!!!!

Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

"All that is necessary for evil to succeed is that good men do nothing."

Edmund Burke

EldarKinSlayer is Dead, Long Live .....BunnySlayer

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#628 hold2file2

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Posted 05 April 2009 - 07:56 PM

Thank you for the Best Science Fiction program in the history of television and an absolutely beautiful and satisfying ending.

"Technology is the use of increasingly accurate, self-evident, and reproducible information to replace energy and matter. The benefit of technology is NOT what it lets people accomplish, but in how it improves the character of people."

#629 sartoris

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Posted 08 April 2009 - 10:15 AM

QUOTE (hold2file2 @ Apr 5 2009, 07:56 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
absolutely beautiful and satisfying ending.


ROFLMAO!!     You are being sarcastic, right?


#630 edutsilva1970

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Posted 22 April 2009 - 03:07 PM

"ROFLMAO!! You are being sarcastic, right?"


That´s the only possible explanation!

The series finale was terrible. I hated it so much that I can´t even begin to describe......

#631 RollingPaper

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Posted 25 May 2009 - 11:25 PM

QUOTE (EldarKinSlayer @ Apr 4 2009, 03:45 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I apologize, I'm Bored BORED BORED!!!!!



Good, we have you exactly where we want you.

*evil laughter*



Looking for love in all the wrong places.

#632 Coolmess

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Posted 29 July 2009 - 02:43 AM

Hey guys just wanted to post a reminder that you can go into the General Discussion forum and find a thread to post your response to the Sci-fi channels name change.  

I thought people here might be interested since part of the BSG success at least the way I saw it was how the producers went out of their way to make the show accessible to the fans on the internet, and to connect with them.

Hi Ron and Mrs. Ron.  Haven't posted in awhile but that's just because Gwen and I have been so busy with our second anniversary.  Thanks again for all your support, and of course the cake.

She and I met thru this website for the show.

~Coolmess

#633 RollingPaper

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Posted 06 August 2009 - 11:23 PM

He's probably wallowing in his own devices.

That's a freebee, so use it or lose it.

*grin*





Looking for love in all the wrong places.

#634 ronsmytheiii

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Posted 31 August 2009 - 07:42 PM

Was watching the sts-128, and caught this gorgeous video of the earth, doesn't it remind you of BSG?




#635 ViperMk1

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Posted 15 September 2009 - 08:03 AM

QUOTE (ronsmytheiii @ Aug 31 2009, 07:42 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Was watching the sts-128, and caught this gorgeous video of the earth, doesn't it remind you of BSG?





The ISS is awesome. It's our first stepping stone to being able to do real research out there.

#636 RollingPaper

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Posted 28 November 2009 - 10:25 PM

Ron

Where forth art thou?

Living on residuals is no way to live.


Looking for love in all the wrong places.

#637 lucian78

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Posted 08 January 2010 - 05:13 PM

Ron

Where forth art thou?

Living on residuals is no way to live.



No but i sure would like to do that <_<

#638 bsgfn4

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Posted 30 January 2010 - 12:42 PM

Dear Ron Moore


Please dont do anymore re-makes. You've done enough damage already.

#639 Zordos

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Posted 31 January 2010 - 07:55 PM

Dear Ron Moore


Please dont do anymore re-makes. You've done enough damage already.


By now, I doubt Ron even looks at these emails, especially with some of the sentiment; however, I thought that BSG was great and sorry to have seen it end.

#640 RollingPaper

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Posted 16 February 2010 - 01:00 AM

By now, I doubt Ron even looks at these emails, especially with some of the sentiment; however, I thought that BSG was great and sorry to have seen it end.



Abandon ship.



-PC
Looking for love in all the wrong places.




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