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#1 MrsRon

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 10:04 AM

Ron logged on last night and posted these responses to questions in the Learning from mistakes thread.
Thought I'd put them in their own thread.


QUOTE (NotABaltar @ Mar 24 2009, 06:31 PM)
Yah, I'm not suggesting that I am convinced by the evidence presented for global warming. I'm just saying it strikes me that RDM chose an ending which closely parellels the rhetoric and proposed solutions for global warming. . . like maybe it's fair to describe the finale as "ripped from the headlines" of many science journals, but with the threat slightly modified.

ETA: I'm bascially saying that it's presently chic to blame human technology on the demise of the species and it's also chic to suggest that we dispose of our technology to solve the problem, and what do you know, the finale takes the chic way out.


RDM here (Mr. Terry to those of you in the know) posting under Terry's screen name to make this easier.

Thought I'd surf in for a while tonight and add a few of my thoughts to your postings.

In response to the above, and a few other postings I've seen, I wanted to say that I really wasn't trying to make some grand anti-technological statement at the end of BSG. Far from holding Luddite tendencies, I'm actually quite taken by techno-whiz-bang and tend to stop in stores and stare at all kinds of devices that go ping. The end of Galactica's story had to do with human choices, human ethics, and the human heart. The conversation between Head Six and Head Baltar was a discussion of what mankind would choose to do this time through the cycle of time that had repeated itself several times already -- that is, would they follow a similar path of destruction, escape, rebirth, etc. There's nothing in the scene to imply that technology is, in and of itself, an evil or pernicious force in our world or any world, rather that man's relationship with his own technology had led to ruin because of the choices and decisions made once that technology reached a certain advanced state of affairs.

I should also add that there's a part of me that is loath to really analyze my own work on this level because like any piece of art it can be interpreted in various ways by the audience and not necessarily have any relationship to the intent of the artist.

In other words, your mileage may vary.

#2 MrsRon

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 10:07 AM

QUOTE (Craziel @ Mar 26 2009, 01:02 AM)
But for some of us, the "end" is not simply the final coda between Head Six and Head Baltar, but the decisions upon arriving on Earth. Such is being discussed here (at least in part).




I couldn't agree more. It's not technology, it's your approach to it. Which makes Lee's "fresh start" stance all the more confusing. Of all the people on the ship, he understood the importance of approach, as evidenced in his offering of unity to the #3.

Adama's statement in the premiere: "sooner or later, the day comes that you can't hide from the things that you've done" - applies equally to whether your relationship with technology is one that leads to the technology turning on you, or whether your relationship with technology is one of abhorrence. I thought after that moment with the #3, Lee would understand that you can compromise with technology, even "cylons", instead of simply being locked in a dynamic whether either you dominate it, or it dominates you.

In a sense, many such days did come, since if we are to follow Lee's decision to it's ultimate conclusion, it took (or has taken) mankind 150,000 years to re-develop Kobol/Caprica-like pre-fall technology. A great many of those years were spent as simple tribespeople, or at least we can assume as much from the historical and archaeological record.

I guess what i'm getting at (as i've said earlier in the thread) is i'd like a little more justification of why a complex character who has made compromises with former enemies suddenly figures the best way to "break the cycle" is not to change how you look at technology, but that you use it at all.

I have no problem with where things ended up (present day), just the pivotal decision that took them there.

Sorry if this crosses the boundary into rabid over-analysis.


RDM here.

What Lee saw was that it would be all to easy for the people in the fleet to simply repeat the mistakes they had made before, most recently on New Caprica, where they had attempted to restart Colonial civilization with unhappy results even before the Cylons arrived and began their occupation. The Baltar administration had been a disaster, the social problems of the colonists had become profound and the entire enterprise was on the verge of chaos before the first baseship jumped into orbit. While Lee himself had made a leap of faith with D'Anna and agreed to work together toward a common goal, it was too much to expect almost forty thousand people to have made a similar leap and to begin anew if they literally brought all their baggage with them. His solution was to wipe the slate clean, remove as many temptations as possible to repeat their past mistakes, disperse the people and try to bring the best part of themselves to this new world they'd found.

Think for a moment of the temptations available to people of the fleet armed with all their technology as they start a new life on a world whose natives are literally living in caves and carrying spears. Would there be any way they would not be gods in that setting? Would they ever be able to avoid playing god and ruling over the indigenous peoples? As it is, he was asking a tremendous amount from the people in the fleet, asking them to bring ideas of literature, art, justice, and so on to the new world, and hoping that they would be embedded either in oral traditions or perhaps in the collective unconscious and survive down through the ages. Asking people to avoid using the massive firepower and amazing technological advantages at their disposal would be asking too much. Would any of the indigenous peoples even survive in that scenario? Is that the gift the people of the 12 Colonies would give to their new home? Complete displacement, possibly annihilation?

Lee's idea, while somewhat idealistic, was at least worthy of survival, and that after all, was really at the heart of the show from the very beginning.

#3 MrsRon

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 10:08 AM

I have two questions on the technology issue. We were shown that the Colonials spread out to settle on different locations around the globe. I assume save for people like Tyrol and Adama that these were just a handful of people in each place so we likely would have 5 or 6 settlememts of around 5,000 - 8,000 each. If we can assume they wanted to keep their language, culture and basics like medical technology they would have to stick together in some form.

The other point earlier in the thread is we have no record of the Colonials so either no attempt was made to keep written history or something happened in the ensuing years. Would it be completely off the wall to imagine RTTF shared language and culture with the humans but simple technology was kept like medicines and books and some cataclysmic event in the last 150,000 years destroyed all the records. To get really out there, hypothetically an archeological excavation in Tanzania could find some of these records or other traces of Colonial cilvilization survived? I rather enjoy imagining the implications if one day that discovery is made. I realize it is highly unlikely.



RDM here.

There was a point in the development process where we discussed the idea of the Galactica not being destroyed, but having somehow landed on the surface more or less intact, but unable to ever get into orbit again (the particulars here were never worked out, so don't ask how she made it down without being torn apart). We talked about them basically abandoning the ship and moving out into the world. Cut to the present-day in Central America where there are these enormous mysterious mounds that archeologists have not been able to understand (it may have been South America, I can't recall the exact location, but these mounds really do exist). Someone is doing a new kind of survey of the mounds with some kind of ground-penetrating radar or something and lo and behold, we see the outlines of the Galactica still buried under the surface.

It was an intriguing idea and we bandied about for a while, but ultimately rejected it as a little too cute and also felt that it w

#4 MrsRon

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 10:09 AM

QUOTE (DaruMozu @ Mar 25 2009, 04:01 PM)
BSG is a religious show dressed up as science fiction.

I was assured earlier in the thread that this was not the case, but I have yet to be presented with any solid evidence to the contrary.


RDM here.

I said since the initial pitch that BSG was a character drama first and foremost, one that happened to be set in a science fiction setting and I stand by that description. Religion and the metaphysical have been part of the human experience since time immemorial, and I decided early on that they would be part of our characters' lives as well. If the fact that the drama decides to include the notion that something else exists beyond what the characters could rationally perceive means that it's then categorized as a "religious show" then so be it, but I do find that to be somewhat of a simplistic definition.

Hi Doru -- Mrs. Ron always says really nice things about you. (Thanks for your input on Gaeta.)

#5 MrsRon

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 10:10 AM

QUOTE (didymos1120 @ Mar 26 2009, 12:42 AM)
Was there also some logistical consideration going on in the writer's room to motivate this choice? For instance, they had just the one tylium refinery, and if anyone wanted to get the hell out of a ship and stay out, it was those people. To keep some sort of intact fleet going, they'd have basically had to force some group to stay up there refining (not to mention somehow supplying them with raw tylium ore) and that ship wasn't holding together much better than Galactica was. Also, it seems like they barely had any industrial capacity left anyway, especially after ditching so much stuff back on New Caprica, and their construction platforms were also space-bound and they'd again have to somehow force people to staff those things or impose some sort of rotation system as discussed at the end of Dirty Hands. I can also see why other large chunks of the populace would be cool with it: the Sagitarrons for example, many of whom didn't even particularly like what limited medical tech they had left. I'd also imagine many Gemenese, with their religious bent, would be all for it.

ETA: Plus, this wasn't a new idea to the Colonials anyway, since Galactica itself was a product of a rather similar, if less drastic, decision made early in the 1st Cylon War.



RDM here.

The example we talked about most frequently in the writers' room was that of Cortez burning his ships when he got to the New World as a way of making sure his men had no choice but to go forward and wouldn't be tempted to change their minds or go back. (This isn't an area of history that I pretend to have a great knowledge of, so I can't say with any certainty that this is anything more than legend.) We liked the idea that Adama would do something similar here, putting the Colonists in a position that they had to go forward, not back and that they would have to embrace their new world without having other options at hand.

#6 MrsRon

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 10:11 AM


QUOTE (MrsRon @ Mar 26 2009, 12:30 AM)
RDM here.

There was a point in the development process where we discussed the idea of the Galactica not being destroyed, but having somehow landed on the surface more or less intact, but unable to ever get into orbit again (the particulars here were never worked out, so don't ask how she made it down without being torn apart). We talked about them basically abandoning the ship and moving out into the world. Cut to the present-day in Central America where there are these enormous mysterious mounds that archeologists have not been able to understand (it may have been South America, I can't recall the exact location, but these mounds really do exist). Someone is doing a new kind of survey of the mounds with some kind of ground-penetrating radar or something and lo and behold, we see the outlines of the Galactica still buried under the surface.

It was an intriguing idea and we bandied about for a while, but ultimately rejected it as a little too cute and also felt that it w

RDM here.

Managed to cut off the rest of my own post somehow. Should have read:

It was an intriguing idea and we bandied it about for a while, but ultimately rejected it as a little too cute and also felt that it would violate our contemporary reality, in essence "branching off" the BSG story in 2009 into an parallel reality where a battlestar was discovered in Central America. I wanted the end of the show to directly related to us, not to a world where that event had occurred.



#7 MrsRon

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 10:12 AM

QUOTE (PaleMoonlight @ Mar 26 2009, 12:51 AM)
Hello there, Mr. Terry.

One of the things I always really liked about the show is the fact there was this balance between the religious and the scientific, and you couldn't really tell (most of the time) which was which. Was Head Six a chip, an angel, a hyper-intelligent pan-dimentional being, or what?

I was just curious, did you always know Head Six was an angel, and just wanted to keep us guessing, or did it just work out best that way in the end?

Oh, I guess in all fairness, since I told you one thing I really liked about the show, I should tell you one thing I never liked at all about the show, the basestar hybrids! Blah! Still like the show, though. Oh, thanks for the show, btw. All in all, nice job.



RDM here.

My initial thinking was that Head Six was a hallucination, that she was a manifestation of Baltar's unconscious in reaction to the realization of his guilt and participation in the genocide of his own race. Basically, he was driven mad by what he'd done and this was the way his mind tried to soothe and comfort himself with notions that there was a God who said everything he'd done was not only all right, but actually serving some greater plan.

My thinking on this notion evolved over time and I decided that I didn't want the journey of Gaius Baltar to be that of a crazy man, but rather that simply of a man. I'd always thought of him as the most human character of all of them and there was something appealing to me of having the most human character -- or the most loathsome, depending on your point of view -- be the one challenged by and in direct contact with some other energy or being or deity or whatever. I began to see as the story evolved that Baltar's journey was a fascinating one and I didn't want it to ultimately be for naught.

Dude, no love for the hybrids? End of line.

#8 Starz

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 10:12 AM

Does that mean I have to paste what I wrote in the other thread??

Cause it was important to me..hehhehe laugh.gif

#9 MrsRon

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 10:13 AM

QUOTE (fellowshipper @ Mar 26 2009, 12:58 AM)
I know I'm off topic here, but there are some burning questions that I just have to ask.


1. What happened to the whole Pythia/Dying Leader thing? Are we to assume that it was indeed Roslin, or that the scriptures were false, the Tomb of Athena meant nothing, and Adama was right about the whole thing being a load of c.rap all along?


2. And since my little shipper heart's been ripped out and stomped on, can you please give me some happy news and tell me that Adama did indeed marry Roslin in the final moments of the show. (Yes, I know that technically she was dead, but I can't start crying again at work right now. I need positive thinking).


3. If I ever meet you in real life, can I take a picture of myself hugging your legs? (Terry will know what this means. Sort of.)


RDM here.

1. The Pythian prophecies turned out to be more right than wrong, if not in every detail. Roslin was indeed a dying leader, the Arrow of Apollo did open the Tomb of Athena which did show them a home where they would see the 12 Colonies in the sky, and so on. We took it as a given that the scriptures were written by men, not by the gods and therefore would have ample room in them for ambiguity or errors in translation down through the years.

2. I don't know any other way to read Adama putting the ring on her finger.

3. Only if Terry says it's okay.

#10 MrsRon

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 10:14 AM

QUOTE (larocque6689 @ Mar 26 2009, 01:01 AM)
Might as well toss a question. Just 'cos I can.

Over at another board, Kara Thrace is being compared to Jesus. Not just an angel (non-corpreal beaing), but someone who actually died (!), and came back with a living body to save everybody... and the on the 40th day she ascended to the Cylon father in heaven. Mankind saved! How deliberate were the Christological or salvific aspects of this.


RDM here.

We talked quite a bit about the Christian mythos and how the story of Kara Thrace would track with it. Kara did literally die -- Baltar rationally proves that -- and she is literally resurrected. He talks about the implications of that in ep 20 and how it held out hope to people for some sort of existence that transcended death.

#11 MrsRon

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 10:14 AM

QUOTE (Shaphie @ Mar 26 2009, 01:08 AM)
Did you really not see Daniel being something that people would jump on? Or are you just evil and love giving Max headaches?


RDM here.

We really never saw that coming. It's one of those things that seems so obvious in hindsight, but no one at the time ever raised the idea that this would become a huge rabbit hole for the fans to jump down. We thought it was interesting backstory and character exposition that neatly filled a continuity problem in the Cylon numbering system and that was about it.

#12 MrsRon

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 10:15 AM

QUOTE (steve2112 @ Mar 25 2009, 01:37 PM)
Just because we don't see what he intended doesn't mean we aren't capable of getting something out of it. I don't blame you in your feelings though. Whenever I used to post to the Dresden Files forum, all the book readers were in there, and they'd put down and rudely correct anybody that just "watched the show", and didn't read the book series. I felt the same way, that I wasn't sophisticated enough.

Maybe all of us aren't sophisticated to comprehend his message, but it's still a major topic of conversation. I think they should be happy with that at least, that people are still talking about it.

I'm not the sharpest knife in the drawer, but I don't berate people for knowing or understanding less than I do.


RDM here.

To be clear, you're free to have any reaction you want to the finale or any other episode for that matter. It's a work of art and there's really no "right" interpretation to take away on the part of the audience. I tend to discuss the intention and the ideas behind what was presented and I will take issue with people who ascribe certain intents to the piece that I think aren't there, but that should in no way be taken as some kind of slam or comment on a lack of sophistication on the part of people who choose to see something in the inkblot that I don't see.

#13 MrsRon

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 10:16 AM

QUOTE (PipStar @ Mar 26 2009, 01:15 AM)
Was Lance a figment of Romo's imagination, a head person, or CylonGod/Ceiling Kitteh?

Why a pigeon??



Comforting to think that the last president of the Colonies was crazy as a bedbug, isn't it?

The image of the bird was just than -- an image. I had no idea what it meant or symbolized, but just saw this picture of a man (didn't even know it was Lee) trying to chase a bird out of his house with a broom. We put it up on the board and then folded it into the story of Lee without trying to define exactly what it meant. I still don't know exactly what it meant. I don't want to.

#14 MrsRon

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 10:17 AM

QUOTE (fellowshipper @ Mar 26 2009, 01:23 AM)
About the flashbacks: wasn't Roslin originally supposed to be about 15 when her father/sisters died? I always assumed (wrongly I suppose) that she had taken care of her ailing mother alone. Why was it the car crash thing that set her destiny in motion and not her mother's death? Was it too hard to ask Mary to play that scene, given what happened to her own mother? And why were Roslin's sisters so young? Was Roslin's flashback supposed to be taking place a long time ago, or was it just a casting mistake? Those girls looked like her children, not her siblings.

RDM here.

I don't think I specified Laura's age in the show bible, which is where the story of the crash was first put down. I felt like she did care for her ailing mother alone, so I think we have to assume that either her mother developed cancer following this incident, which would mean it happened while she was working on Adar's campaign or later when she was Secretary of Education. It's hard to say which of the many strands of any person's life is THE one that leads to any particular end, but I chose to highlight the sequence of events which followed the crash, which was her retreat from life, the successful coaxing of her friend Marcy to date Sean and then her realization that this wasn't where she wanted to be and her impulsive decision to join Adar's campaign. It seemed believable that Laura could have sisters significantly younger than she was, it simply meant either that her parents had waited some interval before having more kids or that there was a divorce or parental death and remarriage involved -- in any case, it seemed fine to us.

#15 MrsRon

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 10:17 AM

QUOTE (Galactica @ Mar 26 2009, 01:25 AM)
and if you have the time for one more...

Did Kara know who/what she was by the time she was saying her goodbyes to Adama/Lee?
I got the impression that she did. Not only from when she tells Adama he'd better go, but when Lee appears to lean in to kiss her and she quickly asks him what he's going to do now...


RDM here.

I don't think she knew much more than what she said, which was that her journey was done, her destiny complete, she wasn't staying and she was happy at last.

#16 MrsRon

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 10:18 AM

QUOTE (Galactica @ Mar 26 2009, 01:20 AM)
Something I've been wondering for awhile now, do Centurions have the same thought processes, rationale and comprehension that the skinjobs do once their inhibitor chips are removed?


RDM here.

No. Our thinking was that the centurions weren't as sophisticated as the skinjobs and were really more at the "dawn" of sentience.

#17 MrsRon

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 10:19 AM

QUOTE (Archemedes1 @ Mar 21 2009, 01:28 AM)
Maybe it's just me, but I don't really get the 'give them time to grow up' impression from that, more of a 'lets wipe the slate clean' and hope for the best. Which again ignores all of the pain and hardship all those poor people have gone through. Why learn to respect the Cylons, to value them as individuals, to gain moral understanding of 'the other', only to turn your back on all that knowledge?



RDM here.

To me, Lee himself -- and perhaps a handful of other characters -- had made the evolution you're touching on here, that is to have a greater understanding of the Cylons and their own humanity, but he realized that it was asking too much to think that all 30K-plus of the colonials had or could make the same leap. Wouldn't it be much more believable to think that mankind would soon revert to form, as they did on New Caprica? His was an idealistic, possibly naive, vision, but it was also one which seemed more likely to at least break the cycle from which they and their ancestors, human and cylon, had all been trapped for literally thousands of years. At the very least, they bought us 150,000 years.

#18 MrsRon

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 10:19 AM

QUOTE (punchface @ Mar 22 2009, 05:31 PM)
The Revelations planet was a cheap trick.
Earth isn't the Earth? What a load of total bulls hit. The Revelations planet isn't Earth. I'm sitting on the only Earth that frakking matters because a story and fake planet can never ever trump our real world and it doesn't matter a good godsda mn if the story, the false reality claims that my Earth is fake.

*

Chief couldn't keep his head together long enough to secure peace. 30 more seconds? How long did he have to hold his anger? It couldn't have been that long. Was the story not about choosing equilibrium over rage? Please tell me I'm not out of my mind because I coulda sworn, after watching for years now, that this was one of THE pivotal points of the show. This was tragic beyond belief. What was Cavil's reward for finally choosing to negotiation over tyranny? What was his reward for choosing peace over war and trust over fear?

*

And I will NOT tolerate luddism. Especially not a voluntary and final gesture of all encompassing luddism that brings an end to a civilization. The bombs on Caprica have finally done their job and the only irony in it is that they not only did their job on the 12 tribes but also on the 13th.

What was the reward for the 13 for choosing peace over war and trust over fear? What was there reward? They get to keep the flesh of their precious few as ses, the 13th gets to die in its entirety while the 12 forget everything, the lose EVERY FRAKKING LAST THING that made them what they are, all their thoughts, their dreams, their knowledge, their art, their science, everything.

Evidently, the reward for living justly and being worthy of survival is oblivion.
All people die whether they die in the glittering cities of the Colonies or they die in a **** ty little mud cabin in Tanzania...the lives of these people mean very little save for what they could/can/should have contributed to the climb toward transcendance and singularity...the climb toward god-hood. Or, if you're not into all that secular-humanist progressive fantasy, then it gets a bit more simple: wisdom accumulates, it's as easy as that. But they don't do that. They choose ignorance and the most primitive brutalities over humankind's only real journey. The romantics had it wrong. James Fenimore Cooper had it wrong. Wordsworth and Geothe had it frakking WRONG. Barbarism is not frakking beautiful and it's not romantic and it's not motherfrakking enlightening. It is beyond stupid that these people after all of this fighting and hoping for their lives would just dump it all in all in the crapper. I can't believe the romantic 19th century anti-age-of-reason bulls hit. My jaw drops and my eyes weep.

What lessons can they teach these stone throwing sharpened stick primitives of "Earth" when they themselves will speedily forget everything? How are we seriously supposed to break the cycle (except through dumb luck) when we can not learn from our forebearers? In the end, all that is left is th stupidist of myths. The 13 gave us what? What was their gift they sacrificed everything for? It was a bunch of lecherous, quarrelsome, violent, and petty gods on ridiculous little mountaintop.

*

Now, in the end, the show becomes a cautionary tale and the message changes from "worthiness" to Adama's "You cannot play God, then wash your hands of the things you've created." This is what we are to take from Galactica. It is our job to love the life that we will soon create or it will blow us up with nukes and the cycle will continue.

This is, to be fair, an awe-filling and exceedingly important message.

It's very relevant. Just to make sure that we, the audience get it, we now know that are illustrious and civilized forebearers lost everything to deliver this message to us...to give us a chance. The people of the last cycle lost everything...everything and all things that mean anything at all. Even their lives mean little compared to what they've lost. My room mate Ryan reminds me that in keeping their sentience, in keeping the measly flesh of their as ses, they have the potential to rebuild and regain everything...but then again, he doesn't know that Earth is already populated by humans and that the human race is not and never was in danger of extinction. The lives of the 13 tribes mean nothing because their human-ness is evidently not uncommon in the universe. Their metabolic processes...their physical lives, mean nothing next to their achievements...achievements now forgotten and cast aside as so much dross. In any case, they obviously didn't teach us sh it, not one frakking thing.

This sucked beyond belief. And the flashbacks were pointless pieces of a life that obviously nobody cared about anyway. Instead, they've chosen to care more about log cabins! All that the flashbacks showed us was just how beautiful Caprica City was. Oohh...my stomach turns....

punchface


RDM here.

Well, obviously I disagree with this interpretation.

If there's anything that should come through loud and clear from the very beginning of the series is that we are somehow connected to these people. Everything from our system of justice to our clothes to the phones on our walls to quite literally the music some of them hear can be seen all around us, so clearly their lives and their existence were not for naught. The show is making a direct connection between them and us and positing the idea that many of the things in our lives are somehow descended through the mists of time -- through the collective unconscious if you like -- down to us today. In addition, we are all blood relatives to both Colonial and Cylon-kind and therefore their existence is more than simply an ancient curiosity, it's family history. Lee's hope that the best part of themselves would be passed along to the people on their new world evidently came true somehow in some ways large and small and so we're watching the story of some of our own history.

You can dispute the historical evidence of that, can argue that it couldn't have happened that way logically, and that it's simply beyond belief that anything they left behind could have survived down to the modern age and directly impacted our lives, but that's a different argument than saying the show is essentially trying wipe away the contributions of these characters or conveying the idea that nothing they did or experienced mattered in the end. Quite the contrary, the show is asserting not only did the experiences of these characters matter, but that their impact was so significant that it shaped some of our contemporary world. Again, you can argue that's not realistic, but the life experience of the BSG characters is clearly meant to be (big-time) impactful.

#19 MrsRon

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 10:20 AM

QUOTE (FragileSteel @ Mar 26 2009, 01:12 AM)
Not a question but this is for Joshua. ( My son).

My son died two years ago. He was a fan of this show and I had never watched it before his passing. I made it a point to watch the series for him. Funny..after a while it was like he was sitting there right along side of me watching each week. I cried through the whole finale because in so many ways and in so many characters in this show I saw my son. My son lives on because of the memories I have of him and like Kara..He will not be forgotten.

Thank you for giving me an extended 2 years with my son and thank you for such a poignant goodbye.




( I know this is way off topic )


I am so sorry for your loss and I'm touched beyond words at your gesture of watching the show after your son's passing. Thank you for sharing this and for your humanity.

Your friend,
Ron Moore

#20 MrsRon

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 10:22 AM

There you go folks.
That was a very tired man last night, who posted at my request. Try to be polite.
Maybe I'll be able to get him to do it again.








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