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#681 ptgoce

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Posted 01 April 2009 - 07:48 PM

QUOTE (ddt73 @ Apr 1 2009, 03:12 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I totally disagree with this assessment. New Caprica failed cause Baltar was a terrible leader and wasn't listening to the people. Also the planet itself was a harsh place to live, not a great place to rebuild. There were too many strikes against them in that environment. With better leadership and a much more hospitable environment like our planet they could have rebuild nicely.

Also all because people have technology doesn't mean they will absolutely enslave or destroy the local people. If the colonials want to do that, it doesn't matter what technology they have they can still do it. By being "modern" people they have enough knowledge to be able to overpower these ancient people.

This move is NOT worthy of survival, you don't forget all the mistakes you made in your past, and hope that no one will make them again. You need to learn from history or you are doomed to repeat it. As Adama said the day comes when you can hide from the things that you have done any more. Colonists are trying to do just that, hide from what they have done, forget about it. By doing this you are dooming them to make the same mistakes. How is doing that make you worthy of survival? How is that any different from what they did on Kobol? Kobol did? They buried their heads in the sand then and repeated the same mistakes again on the colonies. Maybe if they made a point to spell out everything that happened on Kobol, then they wouldn't have created Cylons again.

I always thought the lesson of BSG is that the real problem is people not technology. People have to make decisions what they want to do, how far they will go. People will continue to destroy themselves until they learn not to make the same mistake over and over. Can't always look for revenge or more power, have to allow others to just live and forgive others sins.

Colonials on our planet could have tried to educate the people here and if didn't want to learn then stay away. Over time they could have gained the locals trust and wove them into their society. They certainly don't have to be like our Europeans forefathers and say give us your land and become like us or you are dead. They didn't have to play conquerors. All because it happen before doesn't mean it has to happen again, if you choose not to repeat the mistakes of the past. If this isn't true, then whatever they did they will ultimately be doomed to doing the same mistakes over and over.



Brilliant!
I completely agree with you.


#682 mechanical

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Posted 01 April 2009 - 08:38 PM


Any show that can generate so much reflection, love and hate from its fans is a tour de force.

Mr. & Mrs. Moore, BSG has nothing but love from me  wink.gif.

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#683 MrsRon

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Posted 01 April 2009 - 09:14 PM

QUOTE (feralzebra @ Apr 1 2009, 08:11 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I just want to apologize to both Ron and Terry (Teri?) Moore and any other board posters for the obnoxious way in which I presented myself. While I stand by my criticisms and questions, I do not approve of my presentation of those opinions. I think I got too excited by the thought of possibly getting direct feedback from a creator that I respect that I let my fingers type before I thought about what I was saying. You all come here for well reasoned and considerate debate and discussion, and I kinda pooped on that party.

So, again, sorry.


WOW.
That might be a first. My heartfelt welcome to the forum !!


#684 ariallie

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Posted 01 April 2009 - 09:16 PM

QUOTE (ddt73 @ Apr 1 2009, 03:12 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I totally disagree with this assessment. New Caprica failed cause Baltar was a terrible leader and wasn't listening to the people. Also the planet itself was a harsh place to live, not a great place to rebuild. There were too many strikes against them in that environment. With better leadership and a much more hospitable environment like our planet they could have rebuild nicely.

Also all because people have technology doesn't mean they will absolutely enslave or destroy the local people. If the colonials want to do that, it doesn't matter what technology they have they can still do it. By being "modern" people they have enough knowledge to be able to overpower these ancient people.

This move is NOT worthy of survival, you don't forget all the mistakes you made in your past, and hope that no one will make them again. You need to learn from history or you are doomed to repeat it. As Adama said the day comes when you can hide from the things that you have done any more. Colonists are trying to do just that, hide from what they have done, forget about it. By doing this you are dooming them to make the same mistakes. How is doing that make you worthy of survival? How is that any different from what they did on Kobol? Kobol did? They buried their heads in the sand then and repeated the same mistakes again on the colonies. Maybe if they made a point to spell out everything that happened on Kobol, then they wouldn't have created Cylons again.

I always thought the lesson of BSG is that the real problem is people not technology. People have to make decisions what they want to do, how far they will go. People will continue to destroy themselves until they learn not to make the same mistake over and over. Can't always look for revenge or more power, have to allow others to just live and forgive others sins.

Colonials on our planet could have tried to educate the people here and if didn't want to learn then stay away. Over time they could have gained the locals trust and wove them into their society. They certainly don't have to be like our Europeans forefathers and say give us your land and become like us or you are dead. They didn't have to play conquerors. All because it happen before doesn't mean it has to happen again, if you choose not to repeat the mistakes of the past. If this isn't true, then whatever they did they will ultimately be doomed to doing the same mistakes over and over.


I think if the main characters had been the only survivors, your argument would be very feasible. Unfortunately, there are more than 30,000 other Colonials and cylons who also landed. Abandoning technology would serve two purposes at least:

- Groups and individuals like the remaining black marketeers and Sons of Ares would likely use the technology to gain personal advantage. They've already proven their lack of morality. Taking technology from all somewhat evens the playing field, although evildoers will find a way. (I'm thinking each of the members of those two groups should be assigned to a group of Sixes. Heh heh...)

- Lack of technology would force all individuals in each location to work together just to survive. Hopefully, this forced association would lead to better understanding of those one may have hated by virtue of them being cylon or human. Of course there are those who will hate no matter what, but if you're forced to rely upon others, most will start judging by a different standard.

The one thing I didn't understand was the rush to land everyone on the ground immediately. If Laura Roslin's death gives us any sort of timeline, they didn't seem to do a study of each continent, beyond a quick survey, before they started dispersing the groups. Perhaps the planet, sun and moon were very similar to the twelve colonies, so they innately understood weather patterns, etc. And maybe the animal life was very similar. I hope the extended parts on the dvds will explain some of this.





#685 TowelOfApollo

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Posted 01 April 2009 - 09:36 PM

If Ron does happen to see this, I'd really love to know the official final survivor count. I think the last count we saw before the battle at The Colony was 39,516. It would've been neat to see the count one last time upon the arrival at Earth. Thanks!


#686 Vipergirl100

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Posted 01 April 2009 - 10:39 PM

I mostly wanted to know if Mr. Terry was at all like as portrayed in this Robot Chicken clip

http://www.youtube.c...feature=related

(Or I wondered if RDM had ever seen that, because I just saw it tonight, and it's the funniest thing...)

#687 Eastangle

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Posted 02 April 2009 - 02:26 AM


With all this talk I think we're losing sight of one of the most important issues that the series has raised. There's been no serious discussion of it that I've seen and sooner or later we're going to have to deal with it, so here goes.

Without the podcasts, how's Mrs Ron going to know when Ron's been swearing at the cats?


#688 JaiUK

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Posted 02 April 2009 - 09:22 AM

Dear Mrs Ron,

First and foremost, congratulations (and a heartfelt thanks) to you and your husband for creating such an intelligent, outstanding and thought-provoking drama. Like many people in their thirties (and older), I have very pleasant childhood memories of the original version, so it was fascinating seeing your husband’s own interpretation of the story. The fact that it has generally been such a great success during the past few years – and indeed the fact that so many people worldwide are still debating some aspects of the finale (shown here in the UK last week) deemed to be controversial – is a testament to the overall quality of the writing and the impact BSG has made on such a large viewing audience internationally.

Like some other viewers, the only part of the finale which I personally would have preferred to be different was the very last 5 minutes, specifically in relation to the timeframe of the story’s main events; given the numerous references from the ancient & classical worlds which were scattered throughout the saga (not to mention the clearly Hindu flavour of some of the Colonials’ religious beliefs), I think it would have been more logical for all this to have happened 10-15,000 years ago, rather than 150,000 years in the past. It would have fitted in very well indeed with what we currently know -- or could extrapolate -- about real global history from that era onwards. (However, this would obviously have made the inclusion of the last-minute twist involving Hera and ‘Mitochondrial Eve’ somewhat problematic).

Nevertheless, apart from that, I think that pretty much everything else about the finale and indeed the entire series from the start up to that point was absolutely superb. As a British person of Indian ethnicity, as you can imagine I also liked the subtle and not-so-subtle references to ancient Indian/Hindu religious traditions (including the extract from the Rig Veda during one of the earlier seasons); I’m also sure that the use of a highly-unconventional version of the Gayatri Mantra during the opening title sequence raised a smile of recognition from South Asians everywhere. It was a nice touch.

You may have seen this yesterday on one of the other threads here but, just in case you and Ron missed it, during some free time over the last few days I wrote an ‘alternative ending’ just as a personal ‘creative writing’ exercise. I’m not a professional writer myself, but it’s my own take on what I imagine could have occurred after the fleet arrived at Earth. Up to this point (when Adama has just given his hilltop eulogy to Laura), it follows almost exactly the same storyline as the real finale, except for the aforementioned timeframe (and hence no references to ‘Mitochondrial Eve’) and of course the associated adjustment in the line of dialogue concerning the local Africans’ level of linguistic development.

I’m going to submit this in a separate post below. This is inspired by your husband’s vision of BSG, so please interpret it as a sincere tribute. I hope that you and Ron like it.



#689 JaiUK

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Posted 02 April 2009 - 09:27 AM

Adama stared at the horizon just beyond the mountains. He found that the tranquility of his surroundings gave him some measure of peace, at least; his son, already a thousand miles away, was desperate to overcome his own crippling pain by losing himself in the wilderness, both of them engulfed by their grief, both of them whispering an old lament for two very different women, wishing they could have her again just one more day.

**************************************

The new communities were scattered across almost every continent. Many of the people who had once called themselves Colonials survived, in a fashion; their blood eventually mingled with that of the indigenous humans. And in time, many of their own names and those of their gods were adopted by their new brethren, sometimes even glorified as originating from the nascent earthly civilisations themselves. But across the ages, some of their largest settlements faded or were wiped out completely, due to natural disasters, or dwindling resources that they no longer had the technology to overcome, or indeed due to those most basic and universal human characteristics, the lust for power and the brutality of war.

Huge fortified cities, built several millennia after the Colonials’ arrival and far more advanced than most of their contemporaries, flourished, died and were written into legend, like the vanished rivers nearby. Colossal ruins of stone walls and roads, too regular and organised to occur naturally, ended up submerged deep underwater at the western edge of the planet’s largest ocean. And the most famous kingdom of all, named after a long-destroyed flagship Battlestar, was itself devastated in a single day and night as some of the old hubris had inevitably returned.

The survivors tried to preserve what remained of the old knowledge for as long as they could, attempting to document everything as per Adama’s orders so many years earlier, combining the teachings of their ancestral faith with the terrible lessons their forefathers had learned. As empires rose and fell across the Earth, some listened, but many did not, and the wise found themselves weeping as they witnessed the same mistakes being made again and again, until centuries later their own descendents no longer knew what tragedies had originally inspired such heartbreaking poetry. Still less the joyous music which was like listening to the sun rise and moved many to tears, triggered by feelings of inexplicable longing and a vague sense of recognition, but which never did seem as though it truly belonged to this world.

Hymns that originated on the other side of the galaxy were sung by holy men travelling with tribes of horsemen during generations of migrations, spreading across lands that were now strange, unfamiliar, unmapped, their oral traditions keeping fragments of those scriptures alive. Even as they stared at the night-sky and wondered what lay there, they had forgotten why they found their gaze inexorably drawn towards the stars, or the fact that soon after their arrival, their ancestors had given the constellations certain names so that every glance at the heavens would be a silent tribute to the Fallen.

Half-remembered histories passed into mythology, at first revered, and eventually ridiculed and dismissed as the backward superstitions of delusional, ignorant fools. Many of those who could not bear to believe in the remnants of the truth would have surrendered to their own unspoken doubts, were it not for something ephemeral, intangible protecting them from the nightmare, urging them not to let go; like a senile old man on his death-bed, haunted by the knowledge that he had loved a woman deeply, passionately, yet remembering nothing about her, finding himself screaming in the night, suddenly wide awake, her name always just beyond his reach.

Even the destruction of the Colonials’ remaining spacecraft, plunged into their new home’s sun like a sacrifice to the gods, was emulated by their distant successors as they made their offerings to the sacred fires; the source of the story now lost, like almost everything else, except for an unyielding instinct that somehow, somewhere, there had once been so much more.

*********************************************


15,000 YEARS AFTER THE ARRIVAL

NEW YORK CITY – THE PRESENT DAY


Head-Six and Head-Baltar slowly walked down the centre of Manhattan, unheard and unseen by the chaotic crowd around them. It was a beautiful day; they found themselves soaking in the atmosphere, the impatience, the diversity of the people inhabiting this great city.

“Remind you of anywhere ?”

*
*
*as in finale
*
*

Head-Six waved her hand expansively, unshakeably confident in her own beliefs, as always. “This is all part of God’s plan”.

Head-Baltar lowered his voice, frowning. “You know It doesn’t like to be called that”, he said, briefly gesturing upwards with his eyes.

Head-Six smiled, gently disapproving, arching an eyebrow at his impertinence.

Head-Balter rolled his eyes, unwilling to have this particular argument with her yet again. Some things never changed.

“Of course”, he muttered, shaking his head. “Silly, silly me”.

They resumed their stroll. Head-Baltar looked around at the people hurrying through the streets, so familiar, and yet not; blissfully unaware of the past, blind to what had really happened. He could not decide whether to feel sympathy towards them or merely detached amusement.

Lost in his own thoughts, Head-Baltar did not realise that Head-Six had paused outside a restaurant about a minute earlier, her intuition drawing her closer, as she peered through the darkened windows. The scent of spices filled the air outside the crowded building, already full of customers despite it being the middle of the afternoon. She could hear the music quite clearly; the melody itself did not bear even the faintest resemblance to the original source despite already being archaic, but the words were unmistakeable, even after a dozen translations.

Aum bhūr bhuvaḥ svaḥ
Tat savitur vareṇyaṃ
Bhargo devasya dhīmahi
Dhiyo yo naḥ prachodayāt.....


Head-Six’s sardonic mask slipped. She never forgot anything, of course.

She closed her eyes for a few seconds, remembering that life here began out there, a momentary prayer for those who were the first to call themselves human.

Her long strides meant she caught up with her companion quickly, both of them uncharacteristically silent as they faded into the distance, swallowed up by the sound of traffic and the masses jostling around them; but they could still hear the ancient hymn from Kobol lingering in the air, an echo of paradise, like perfume in the wind.



#690 ariallie

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Posted 02 April 2009 - 09:51 AM

QUOTE (JaiUK @ Apr 2 2009, 10:27 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Adama stared at the horizon just beyond the mountains. He found that the tranquility of his surroundings gave him some measure of peace, at least; his son, already a thousand miles away, was desperate to overcome his own crippling pain by losing himself in the wilderness, both of them engulfed by their grief, both of them whispering an old lament for two very different women, wishing they could have her again just one more day.

**************************************

The new communities were scattered across almost every continent. Many of the people who had once called themselves Colonials survived, in a fashion; their blood eventually mingled with that of the indigenous humans. And in time, many of their own names and those of their gods were adopted by their new brethren, sometimes even glorified as originating from the nascent earthly civilisations themselves. But across the ages, some of their largest settlements faded or were wiped out completely, due to natural disasters, or dwindling resources that they no longer had the technology to overcome, or indeed due to those most basic and universal human characteristics, the lust for power and the brutality of war.

Huge fortified cities, built several millennia after the Colonials’ arrival and far more advanced than most of their contemporaries, flourished, died and were written into legend, like the vanished rivers nearby. Colossal ruins of stone walls and roads, too regular and organised to occur naturally, ended up submerged deep underwater at the western edge of the planet’s largest ocean. And the most famous kingdom of all, named after a long-destroyed flagship Battlestar, was itself devastated in a single day and night as some of the old hubris had inevitably returned.

The survivors tried to preserve what remained of the old knowledge for as long as they could, attempting to document everything as per Adama’s orders so many years earlier, combining the teachings of their ancestral faith with the terrible lessons their forefathers had learned. As empires rose and fell across the Earth, some listened, but many did not, and the wise found themselves weeping as they witnessed the same mistakes being made again and again, until centuries later their own descendents no longer knew what tragedies had originally inspired such heartbreaking poetry. Still less the joyous music which was like listening to the sun rise and moved many to tears, triggered by feelings of inexplicable longing and a vague sense of recognition, but which never did seem as though it truly belonged to this world.

Hymns that originated on the other side of the galaxy were sung by holy men travelling with tribes of horsemen during generations of migrations, spreading across lands that were now strange, unfamiliar, unmapped, their oral traditions keeping fragments of those scriptures alive. Even as they stared at the night-sky and wondered what lay there, they had forgotten why they found their gaze inexorably drawn towards the stars, or the fact that soon after their arrival, their ancestors had given the constellations certain names so that every glance at the heavens would be a silent tribute to the Fallen.

Half-remembered histories passed into mythology, at first revered, and eventually ridiculed and dismissed as the backward superstitions of delusional, ignorant fools. Many of those who could not bear to believe in the remnants of the truth would have surrendered to their own unspoken doubts, were it not for something ephemeral, intangible protecting them from the nightmare, urging them not to let go; like a senile old man on his death-bed, haunted by the knowledge that he had loved a woman deeply, passionately, yet remembering nothing about her, finding himself screaming in the night, suddenly wide awake, her name always just beyond his reach.

Even the destruction of the Colonials’ remaining spacecraft, plunged into their new home’s sun like a sacrifice to the gods, was emulated by their distant successors as they made their offerings to the sacred fires; the source of the story now lost, like almost everything else, except for an unyielding instinct that somehow, somewhere, there had once been so much more.

*********************************************


15,000 YEARS AFTER THE ARRIVAL

NEW YORK CITY – THE PRESENT DAY


Head-Six and Head-Baltar slowly walked down the centre of Manhattan, unheard and unseen by the chaotic crowd around them. It was a beautiful day; they found themselves soaking in the atmosphere, the impatience, the diversity of the people inhabiting this great city.

“Remind you of anywhere ?”

*
*
*as in finale
*
*

Head-Six waved her hand expansively, unshakeably confident in her own beliefs, as always. “This is all part of God’s plan”.

Head-Baltar lowered his voice, frowning. “You know It doesn’t like to be called that”, he said, briefly gesturing upwards with his eyes.

Head-Six smiled, gently disapproving, arching an eyebrow at his impertinence.

Head-Balter rolled his eyes, unwilling to have this particular argument with her yet again. Some things never changed.

“Of course”, he muttered, shaking his head. “Silly, silly me”.

They resumed their stroll. Head-Baltar looked around at the people hurrying through the streets, so familiar, and yet not; blissfully unaware of the past, blind to what had really happened. He could not decide whether to feel sympathy towards them or merely detached amusement.

Lost in his own thoughts, Head-Baltar did not realise that Head-Six had paused outside a restaurant about a minute earlier, her intuition drawing her closer, as she peered through the darkened windows. The scent of spices filled the air outside the crowded building, already full of customers despite it being the middle of the afternoon. She could hear the music quite clearly; the melody itself did not bear even the faintest resemblance to the original source despite already being archaic, but the words were unmistakeable, even after a dozen translations.

Aum bhūr bhuvaḥ svaḥ
Tat savitur vareṇyaṃ
Bhargo devasya dhīmahi
Dhiyo yo naḥ prachodayāt.....


Head-Six’s sardonic mask slipped. She never forgot anything, of course.

She closed her eyes for a few seconds, remembering that life here began out there, a momentary prayer for those who were the first to call themselves human.

Her long strides meant she caught up with her companion quickly, both of them uncharacteristically silent as they faded into the distance, swallowed up by the sound of traffic and the masses jostling around them; but they could still hear the ancient hymn from Kobol lingering in the air, an echo of paradise, like perfume in the wind.


Thank you. That was a lovely alternative ending.





#691 MrsRon

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Posted 02 April 2009 - 10:53 AM

QUOTE (Vipergirl100 @ Apr 1 2009, 11:39 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I mostly wanted to know if Mr. Terry was at all like as portrayed in this Robot Chicken clip

http://www.youtube.c...feature=related

(Or I wondered if RDM had ever seen that, because I just saw it tonight, and it's the funniest thing...)


Well, you have heard him with the cats...

He had so much fun doing those Robot Chickens, he and Seth have become pretty good friends, something that sorta frightens me, LOL.


#692 MrsRon

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Posted 02 April 2009 - 10:54 AM

QUOTE (Eastangle @ Apr 2 2009, 03:26 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
With all this talk I think we're losing sight of one of the most important issues that the series has raised. There's been no serious discussion of it that I've seen and sooner or later we're going to have to deal with it, so here goes.

Without the podcasts, how's Mrs Ron going to know when Ron's been swearing at the cats?


Oh, she'll have ample opportunity.


#693 Eastangle

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Posted 02 April 2009 - 11:30 AM

QUOTE (MrsRon @ Apr 2 2009, 11:54 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Oh, she'll have ample opportunity.


rolleyes.gif I'm sure!

I try not to get grouchy with mine, even when I'm stretched out flat on the sofa watching TV and she decides that the only place worth sitting is on my chest, about four inches from my eyes.

Sorry, wildly off-topic.

#694 ndb81dec

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Posted 02 April 2009 - 02:29 PM

2 simple and short questions, if this is still possible: why did the tribes leave Kobol and did the 13th Cylon tribe build the tomb of Athena ?

#695 Sephiroth144

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Posted 02 April 2009 - 03:37 PM

QUOTE (MrsRon @ Apr 2 2009, 11:53 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Well, you have heard him with the cats...

He had so much fun doing those Robot Chickens, he and Seth have become pretty good friends, something that sorta frightens me, LOL.



Just...

just make sure you keep the ammo locked up, por favor...

PMing me does not work- I'll know you tried, but can't open it. Just a heads-up, (I can send, but can't get or get back... 'tis different)

Tree of Life or Stabbity Death?
@ tweet frakkin' tweet @
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Mysidian Moments- My Photography Homepage ** MizuSoft- Apps and Games
Start of the most recent project- The Maybelline Girls

Emperor of the Bamber Leporidae, Captain of the A-Bucs, Grace Chaser 001, et al

Or, just "The Seph" ;)

Hmmm...


#696 gav2000

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Posted 02 April 2009 - 04:19 PM

Hi Ron if you are still reading this. I must say that there are a number of parallels between the finale of this and Deep Space Nine, which I know you were in charge of for a time. One of them is a character returning to be with God, i.e. Sisko and Thrace. Another thing that has particularly remained with me is one thing Quark says in that final episode "The more things change, the more things stay the same". I am aware that you did not write the final episode of DS9 but I was certainly very surprised when I heard that exact line in part 1 of Daybreak! I think that phrase is almost the key to the whole BSG "mythology" and the "warning" you have placed at the end. There are certainly more parallels to be drawn with DS9 and BSG in terms of the prohepts and predestination as you seem to have explored in BSG
Sightly off topic but DS9 was far and away my favourite Star Trek series and I think I have you and Ira Steven Behr for that. I wrote my BA dissertation on how Star Trek was racist in terms of other races (before anyone shouts at me, it took 12000 words to explain and just think of the way Bones constantly berates Spock for not being human enough "you green blooded son of a..." and Sisko to Worf "There is a limit to how far I will respect cultural diversity on this station", the Bringloadi in TNG with its obvious negative Irish traveller streotyping) and DS9 certainly helped me with writing it due to the shades of grey into it.
Anyway, I have loved BSG and is probably the best series ever on TV.

#697 feralzebra

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Posted 02 April 2009 - 05:18 PM

QUOTE (MrsRon @ Apr 1 2009, 10:14 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
WOW.
That might be a first. My heartfelt welcome to the forum !!


Thanks for the welcome!  I'm gonna give this a second go and try not to make such a fool out of myself.

The series is a beautiful piece, especially now that it is complete, but one of its strengths was that it never played one tempo on any given episode or during the course of its run.  One week could have a big space battle with lots of action and the next could be all character work, yet both episodes were equally great.  However, for me personally, I found the second half of season for to drag in some areas but go too fast in others.  Did you ever find this to be a problem and what are some ways you fought against it over the course of the show?

The final battle was certainly epic, but I had some issues that dragged me out of the moment.  One issue I had was the Colony itself.  I didn't feel like it belonged in the BSG world for some reason.  Why did you choose to go to the Colony for the finale instead of a fleet of Basestars or back to Caprica?  What brought you to the idea of the Colony?  Another moment that shook me out of the BSG head-space was when dead Racetrack fired the nukes.  Was this part of the statement of the show, some sort of "divine" intervention?  Additionally, that was one of the only moments in the entire series that felt campy to me; did you ever feel like you had to fight the classic sci-fi stigma of "camp"?  Also, I didn't feel the last battle exacted enough of a toll on the Colonials, especially the main characters.  What was the process for deciding who should live and who should die, like Helo for instance?

I loved the idea of Daniel; do you feel like you missed a gold mine for not hitting on that earlier because fan reaction was huge?  I loved the revelation that Earth had destroyed itself, and, knowing that our Earth is different from the 13th Tribe's Earth, I felt as though the discovery of our Earth was somewhat of a cop-out.  Were you concerned that it would be too bleak if they never found our Earth as a place they could call home?  Did you worry about the politics of show much, or did you concern yourself more with character and other aspects of the show?  Are there any other genres beside sci-fi that appeal to you, and what about science fiction keeps you coming back?  

Again, BSG is one of the greatest television series ever, consistently being better than everything else on the air at that time.  I introduce everyone I can to the show, and everyone who gives it a chance falls in love with it as much I am.  You've created something that had a real message and will hold that message for decades to come.  Congratulations on a great run!

#698 lonerockghost

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Posted 02 April 2009 - 05:52 PM

It occurs to me, given how and when BSG ended up, that Ron has about 145,000 years of Earth history to write (rewrite?) for us. When should we be expecting that first installment? tongue.gif (in addition to the entire history of Kobol, of course biggrin.gif )

I do have a new question for Ron. BSG created a new phenomenon by fostering an online community (forums, webisodes, etc) and interaction with fans with podcasts along with the traditional conventions (which I sadly have never been able to attend), even expanding to a new forum at the UN. My question is will Ron, as creator and fearless leader, foster the continuation of this community?

Though I hope Sci Fi will keep this forum going (lots of friends hang out here but it is sure to die off with the show over) and there will surely be a forum for Caprica, I am hoping there will be an official PLACE or HOME for RDM's BSG online community that isn't dependent on Sci Fi. If the forum could be transferred over to that site, that would be better yet. I know there are a LOT of different sites out there related to it and I don't know if Ron is involved in any of them but a central, official home for the community would be nice. Something that can continue the ideas and mythology of this version of BSG into the future and keep us up to date on any related projects (sorry, no interest in TOS myself). The Meaning of BSG thread highlights a lot of perspectives raised by the show that will inform how we deal with many issues in the future, especially AI and artificial life. Any thoughts on the suggestion?

Edit: (ps. I am in no way hoping to have anything to do with said site other than being a loyal fan. I have my own little site I have to play with but what I am suggesting and hoping for here is WAY over my level of involvement and abilities)

#699 LaG19

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Posted 03 April 2009 - 01:45 AM

An interesting article appeared on Yahoo today courtesy of Reuters. Perfect timing, and it makes you wonder, will this all happen again?

http://news.yahoo.co..._science_robots


#700 JaiUK

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Posted 03 April 2009 - 06:24 AM

Ariallie,

QUOTE
Thank you. That was a lovely alternative ending.


Really nice of you to say so -- thank you very much for taking the time out to read it. It was suitably poignant, I hope wink.gif






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