Photo
* * * * * 1 votes

Dead Like Me - Background to Resurrection


  • Please log in to reply
64 replies to this topic

#41 Danioton

Danioton

    Viper Pilot

  • Full Members
  • Pip
  • 103 posts

Posted 14 April 2012 - 06:11 PM

(Continuation for Episode 204 The Shallow End)

(1) (Opens with a view of young George floating in a swimming pool with her head under water as we listen to George narration. This is a cut from the end of the episode just before the lifeguards jump in to save young George.)

GeorgeVoiceOver: Deep down, we all want to know if we’re loved.
It’s the fundamental question.
But when I was a kid the question was even more basic.

Does anyone even like me?

I’m sure there’s all kinds of theories on how to help girls get over their insecurities and self doubts….but it takes a pretty twisted mind to think that swim day is the answer.

Thanks a lot, Mom.


(A not too subtle finger pointing at Joy here. The scene opens up to see an indoor swimming pool with lots of kids and in particular a clutch of young girls that Joy believes for some reason – even tho they look older than young George – are the group George should become friends with.)

GVO: When I was ten, I learned one of life’s most valuable lessons. No matter how uncool you think you are, there’s someone even less cool just a pool’s length away.

And that someone was Beth Anne Miller.


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(2) (Shifts to another outside restaurant with some living young women chatting among themselves.)

GVO: Recently I’ve been thinking a lot about crossing over. But when you’re alive crossing over is even harder.

(Doesn’t develop the thought, but the voice over leads up to think of the reapers as being held out of the in-crowd – those that get to cross over via their lights – contrasting with here among the living those inside vs those outside.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(To Reggie in her room as Joy comes in - Reggie is looking herself over in a mirror. Here crossing over seems to mean growing up.)

GVO: Much harder.

(Joy wants to take Reggie to the mall for some shopping together. Reggie initial reaction is to cause Joy some grief, but she relents and decides to go.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(3) (Opens back at the pool with young George outside the group wanting / thinking on the problem of getting in, but soon shifts to the present day Waffle Haus where we see George’s eyes thru a glass of water as she watches coins she’s dropping in. Mason and Daisy – two buddies now – are perched looking over the back of the reaper booth watching/commenting on how Kiffany controls one of her customers – mostly by ignoring him until she’s ready, or she judges he’s ready, for her to deign to take his order. As the camera pulls back we see that Rube is in the booth next to George, and he does not appreciate the backside view of Mason.)

M: If people think you don’t like them, they want it even more.
Pathetic really, isn’t it?
R: Hey, Captain *ssh*le
M: Yaa?
R: This view is ruining a perfectly good breakfast.
(As Daisy and Mason turn to sit in the booth facing Rube)
D: I’ll have you know men have died for that view.
M: So that was today’s lesson from the Waffle Haus. Withhold the love and you gain the power.
(Rube looks at George thru her glass of water)
R: Hey, George, you wanna come outta the pool?
G: No. I like it here. Will resurface for food.
R: You (Rube pulls postit and places in front of George)
You (to Mason - he gets a reap at a pool)
You (to Daisy)
(Mason talks about his dislike of pools and drowning as a way to die – turns you blue. Daisy starts singing the blues and Roxy enters. Rube has a postit for her and indicates he wants her to stay – she apparently has been spending a lot a time away.)
Roxy: You got the blonde hair blue eyed blues again Daisy?
Daisy: Yes.
Roxy: (to Rube) Hit me Rube.
Rube: Nice to see you, Roxy. Why don’t you stay awhile? (Rube holds her postit just out of her reach.)
Roxy: I would, but I don’t want to.
M: Now Roxy, here, is a classic withholder. She inspires fear thru restraint.
Roxy: I inspire fear thru my nine-millimeter, and my penetrating gaze. (Roxy shows her belt.)
M: Is that a pepper spray on your fancy utility belt, Roxy?
(Here comes the empty headed Mason introduced this season.)
Roxy: It is, Mason. You wanna play with it?
M: Yes (she removes and hands it to Mason !!!!!)

(???!!! Mason now sprays his plate of food with the pepper spray with collateral damage hitting George across the table and bringing her out of her reverie in the glass/pool. Mason then eats some of the food with predictable results – he spits out food, water, across the table hitting Kiffany as she approaches the table to give Rube some more coffee. Roxy leaves. When Mason tries to assert the idea that the eggs were bad, Kiffany rejects that – ‘Maybe you shouldn’t have maced them.’)

M: See Rube. You have the power in that relationship. She loves you. She hates me.
Rube: I tip $2 on a $7 breakfast. It’s not brain surgery.
G: This is in, like, 5 minutes.
Rube: Well then maybe you should, like, get a move-on.

(Notice that Rube didn’t bring the time constraint on George’s reap to her attention when he gave it to her, which forces her to hurry off. Now it’s just Daisy, Mason, and Rube in the booth. Daisy has something to say to Rube about his hold over her.)

D: You do that, you know? You withhold the love.
M: Yeah.
R: How can I withhold that which I do not possess?
Eat your breakfast.

(A modest contribution here towards viewing Rube as unemotional, untouchable, and distant from normal human concerns. This perspective on Rube is already at odds with his obvious need for something from George from prior episodes.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(7) (We see George exiting the elevator at Happy Time wearing a blue coat with blood splatter across the chest from her early morning reap - a guy repairing his lawn mower – successfully as it turns out. She tells everyone it’s a cherry slurpee including Ethan the computer geek she finds working to remove the Nazi bug/worm infecting her computer. She quickly discovers the hidden bully within herself as the worse she treats Ethan the more eager he becomes to please her.)

GVO: Most girls are late for work because they overslept, or they missed their bus. Most girls didn’t have to spend their morning watching a guy try to repair his own lawnmower.

Successfully…… I might add.

The great thing about work is no matter how f*ck*d up your personal life is, your professional life can make it seem normal.


(This is where poor Ethan takes George’s purse to the head and then when he sees the ‘slurpee’ on her coat, between that and the blow to the head, he’s about to puke.

Ethan is cleaning George’s computer of the Nazi bot on her hard drive. He also took the opportunity to reorganize her computer files, which gets George to see the possibilities of not sending him off right away.)

GVO: There are definite perks to having smart guys like him. I had to wonder what good deed I had done to deserve this.

And then it dawned on me.

Maybe withholding affection does work a certain magic.


(George was listening at the Waffle Haus glass of water/pool this morning.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(11) (Back at the pool young George is failing her test to enter the in-crowd when she can’t bring herself to do something mean to Beth Anne Miller.)

GVO: Beth Anne Miller and I weren’t exactly the same, but we weren’t exactly different. We both orbited that thin air light years away from the center of the social universe. OK, fine….we were geeks. But whatever it was that we shared, well …. the ties that bind were a little loose that day.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(12) (We find Mason entering a the locker area of a public pool as he homes in on his reap.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(12) (And Daisy’s reap turns out to be at a plastic surgeon’s office altho at first she’s not aware of this – she takes her cues and adapts as she goes. Her reap hasn’t actually arrived yet. We get the SAG joke at the plastic surgeon’s. Since her reap isn’t there, she decides to go thru the sign in process and answer questions. There are several levels to the humor here - Daisy at a plastic surgeon’s office – and then a plastic surgeon ranks up there with health insurance and social security as concerns for a reaper.)

Question: Do you love you?
Daisy: Yes!
Q: Do you deserve to love you even more?
Daisy: Well, I can’t see why not.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(14) (Mason gains entry, finds it’s a nude pool, and finds his reap telling a story about his son-in-law and cable tv reception. As the reap’s death appointment approaches we see a graveling come up thru the pool drain to get to his appointment – graveling coming thru pool drain = death for someone.

As the old man climbs out of the pool to go to the diving board, Mason reaps him and notices his balls are huge.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(16) (Joy and Reggie at the mall where Reggie gets rid of Joy to do her shopping.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(17) (Mason watches his reap and a graveling high up on a diving board - the old man dives to his death. Mason talks to the old man afterward and gets a rude surprise when the old man refuses to pass over into his lights – he wants to go to his own funeral – and Mason doesn’t know what to do.

Mason confirms reapers are not angels.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(19) (Reggie runs into a slick sales girl in a mall clothes store.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(20) (At Happy Time George is walking the carpet exploring the potential of being an *ssh*le.

GVO: In a fair world nice people would be liked, and mean people would be disliked. Buuut, that’s not the way things work.

In a fair world behaving like a complete *ssh*le would make you really unpopular. But this isn’t a fair world, and the &ssh&les have followers and disciples and assistants. The &ssh&les are treated like kings.


(Ethan notices that George smells a bit like waffles.)

GVO: In a world where perfectly decent girls get brained by cosmic spacesh*t and get accused of being Nazi sympathizers I was having trouble turning the other cheek.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(22) (Back to young George at the pool being pushed to bully Beth Anne …. and failing to pass the test.)

GVO: Being mean was more fun. Being mean was cool.

And I was never very cool.


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(22) (We see Daisy sitting in the waiting room at the plastic surgeon as two women start a squabble. It turns out she’s sitting next to a man who turns out to be her reap. He’s there about getting a sex change operation, but he ends up dead when one woman throws a very sharp high heel shoe missing her intended target.

Daisy is expecting a woman and she asks the two squabblers if either is a Mrs. Samuels and then her target speaks up. He’s curious because he notices that even tho she’s smooth – turning her attention to him after he speaks up - she was looking for a she not a he.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(24) (Joy at the mall meets a young man behind the cosmetics counter who’s got a nice slick sales pitch of his own.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(25) (At happy Time George starts to bump into (with Crystal in this case) the limits of being mean and it gets noticed by Delores – always ready to help guide her young protégé.)

GVO: Part of me knew that being mean was reckless, that it was kind of like driving too fast. So what if I wasn’t wearing my seat belt? So what if I occasionally scraped another fender?

Nice girls don’t get the guy. Nice girls don’t rise to the top.


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(26) (We see Roxy beating up on a suspect. And then young George sitting - alone – by the edge of the pool.)

GVO: Nice girls finish last.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(26) (Mason is walking in the park with his newly dead soul, Theo, trying to convince him to cross over. He removes his towel and walks naked thru the park – only Mason can see and he finds it disturbing.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(27) (Daisy is talking to her reap as his body is collected and his killer arrested. He notices her cross and asks whether she’s Catholic. Her response ‘I’m thinking about it.’ It turns out he’s Catholic and tells her about his frustration being born the wrong gender. They leave together after he asks whether he can go to church one last time.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(28) (Joy finds Reggie wrapping up her purchases. Outside she gets accosted by a young man –to show us she’s ready for the post Clancy world.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(29) (At Happy Time Ethan is explaining how he’s reorganized her computer and he shows her a ring binder with dozens of postits, something, which gives George an almost allergic reaction. She tosses the heavy ring binder onto an origami Ethan made for her – and George starts to regret her meanness.

GVO: I wasn’t always like this.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(30) (At the pool with young George - she rejects Beth Anne.)

GVO: I used to be a nice person.

But being nice didn’t seem to work either.


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(31) (Jumping back to Happy Time - as George sits at her desk contemplating Ethan’s crushed swan Crystal walks by dumping some files into George’s cubicle just as Delores comes up. Delores tells Millie that Ethan has just quit – he couldn’t take the cut-throat corporate environment, ……and then George confuses an event with Delores from her life with the here and now with Delores.)

GVO: It’s like anyway I play it …..I wind up alone.

D: Back in the days when I had all of those restraining orders against me, I thought hate was the answer.
G: Seriously, Delores, I’m not a Nazi.
D: Oh I know that, silly. I’m just trying to say sometimes when I have to choose between the bullwhip and the smile, I choose the smile.
(George looks confused.)
G: That was one of the first things you ever said to me.
D: Hm?
G: You said ‘I haven’t seen you smile once.’
D: I don’t think so. I said that to another young girl, a lovely young girl, tragic what happened.
G: Ya, my mistake.
D: Millie…….Ethan just quit.
G: What!?
D: He said he wasn’t cut out for this corporate cutthroat culture.
What happened, Millie?
G: I had a bad day.
D: No! Millie….. Ethan had a bad day.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(32) (Daisy is walking with her newly dead soul, Stan, thru a park on the way to church – his last request - taking great care to ease him into his lights.

D: Why are you going to church?
S: That’s where you talk to God, Daisy. It’s his house.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(33) (Joy walks in on Reggie in front of a mirror and realizes how much / fast she’s growing up - bringing that fact to our attention too. Reggie is facing a transition of her own.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(34) (Over at the Waffle Haus we see Rube, Roxy, and George at the booth. George looks seriously down in the dumps as she recovers from the blowback from her experiment in treating her co-workers like sh*t. Notice Rube tells her to eat her soup before it gets cold - like he has some responsibility for her – i.e. like he’s her father. George asks Roxy if she cares whether people like her - not surprising anyone Roxy says no. Soon the nude old man with the gigantic balls shows up brought by Mason to Rube for his help in getting him to cross over. Roxy confronts Mason with his failure to take care of his own reap, and Mason finally pulls it together giving Theo the final push – urging him not to keep Betty, his wife, waiting - to get him to go over.

As an aside we see just how much Mason cares whether Daisy likes him when George asks him too whether he cares whether people like him. Mason immediately assumes it’s about Daisy liking him.

When Theo walks up to Rube, Roxy, Mason, and George at the booth the camera catches the edge of a nice discrete covering for Theo’s privates – no sensibilities were seriously hurt in the filming of this scene.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(38) (Daisy and Stan at the church where he confronts God about his having made him the wrong gender. When some young ‘hooligans’ (use of a word – a nice touch – dating Daisy as much older than her appearance) throw a ball thru a window Daisy leaves the church and misses his crossing over. Daisy’s being chosen for this reap – a devout young man with some serious issues/conflicts with God – complements her chosen path – the cross and her interest in orthodox Catholic faith – as she struggles with her decades long holdover as a reaper waiting for her own crossing over/transition. Why was she held over as she was? As she talks to God/PTB in the huge church empty but for her she prays. Notice she shows a cryptic smile at the very end.)

Stan: Why would God do this to me?
D: Do what? Have you die this way?
S: Have me live this way.
God doesn’t love all creatures, Daisy.
D: I think you should pray, Stan.
S: I want to forgive Him. But I want Him to tell me…..that He’s sorry first.

(Ball comes thru a window and Daisy leaves briefly and while she’s gone Stan gets his lights and leaves with a smile. Daisy returns to an empty church. She settles in to pray.)

D: Blessed art thou amongst women. (smiles)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(41) (Back at the WH, we see that Theo is gone and the booth is back to normal as George in the booth with Mason and Rube, in a voiceover sums up the episode theme. All three look deep in thought, but no smiles. Daisy is at the church watching the janitor clean up the broken window. Roxy shows up for her posit and leaves. Reggie finds out the slick sales girl at work with the same pitch on another girl. Joy is trying the new cosmetics.)

GVO: I don’t know exactly what makes people cross over. I mean, souls.

I think they see light where others cannot.

I think they see a chance to become something else……….someone else.

Some people are becoming who they’re going to be.
(We see Reggie on screen.)

Others are just trying to be anything, but who they are. (Roxy coming to Rube for her postit.)

And others just can’t decide. (Joy)

(Reggie sees the slick sales girl working her pitch on another girl and realizes she’s not the new friend she had hoped.)

Everybody wants to be liked.

(George pulls up in her mustang across from the sidewalk restaurant where Ethan is sitting with several others.)

I know I did.

(George in the mustang pulls to a stop at a scenic overlook – alone.)

But I knew I was still looking…..for something, for someone…..for light.

(Back at the pool with young George, Beth Anne comes up to her standing on the edge.)

And I had no idea where I’d find it.

(Young George gets pushed into the pool where she drifts gently down with her eyes wide open looking down.)

When I was 10 something happened to me.

And something happened to Beth Anne Miller.


(Beth Anne having pushed George into the pool moves over to join the in crowd.)

And it changed both of our lives…..forever.

(At this point we see that underneath young George are two gravelings who have come up thru the drain – just as another one of their kind did to get to Theo for his reap implying they’re not here just to swim – they intended to cause a death. One of the two begins to move towards young George, but is held back by his companion. Young George is looking down and we see just a slight smile appear on her face, but no other reaction as she slowly floats downward. The graveling holding back his companion says something close into the ear of that first graveling, and then moves back toward the drain. The first graveling looks contemplatively up at George and then there’s clearly a slight trace of a smile before he too moves back toward the drain after the second graveling. And then two lifeguards jump in to take hold of young George and bring her to the surface. Finally we are treated to lots of bright lights before fading to the credits.)
Dead Like Me Resurrection pending

#42 Danioton

Danioton

    Viper Pilot

  • Full Members
  • Pip
  • 103 posts

Posted 05 May 2012 - 06:59 PM

Ep 205 Hurry

Rube Sofer: Why didn’t this get to where it was going?
Post Office Clerk: I wouldn’t know that, sir.
R: Well, this was sent a long time ago.
POC: Perhaps the people moved.
R: No, they didn’t move.
POC: I don’t know what happened, sir. I wasn’t there. This is almost 80 years …. 80 years old.
R: This is unacceptable.
POC: Sir, it might be unacceptable, but it is the way it is.
It was in the dead letter office. It took a long while to make it’s way back, but now you have it.
R: Well, this is a mistake.
POC: It came back.
R: This is a terrible mistake.
POC: On behalf of the US postal system I apologize for any inconvenience this might have caused you or your family.
R: You have no idea.


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

This is the episode in which an efficiency expert shows up at Happy Time to audit Delores’ handling of the office. The contrast in the episode is everyone hurrying up striving to do things quickly - efficiency - and the cash filled dead letter taking 77 years to get back to Rube. Perhaps the letter’s delay is just another kind of efficiency on a different not-human time scale as the PTB do things for their reasons in their own time.

The letter is the key event in this episode (and so far this season). Next in importance would be that when Rube sits alone devastated at the Waffle Haus booth contemplating the implications (to/for his family) of the letter not arriving some 77 years prior, it’s George who shows up to give him some comforting talk one on one, even tho she clearly knows nothing about the letter or for that matter why he is so obviously upset.

The cash filled envelope in this episode is the earliest clearest most important evidence that there is a third primary theme or arc at work alongside the obvious two – 1) George’s reaction to her own death and 2) George’s interactions with her family – both out in front of the audience from the first S1 episode. And that third main theme revolves around Rube and George. As understated and delayed as it has been in showing itself its complications encompass the first two, and likely it would have been the dominant theme in the third season as the events surrounding Rube’s death and his family are likely to have impacted George and how her interactions with her family (primarily probably Reggie) get resolved. Something went very wrong for Rube 77 years ago. Would it have repeated or perhaps rhymed in some way for George as perhaps Reggie worked toward a meeting or confrontation?

With the arrival of the cash filled envelope – key event in a key episode - we can see that the destinies of Rube and George are interdependent in ways we couldn’t have guessed at before. It tells us that there is a potential level of benevolent concern and intervention on the part of the PTB that oversee and control the reapers much higher and more convoluted than what we’ve been shown so far – a strong positive it might seem. But any careful viewing of S2 reveals numerous instances in which the scenes and dialogue direct our attention to a darker potential side to the PTB and we have to ask why the writing team thought it necessary to do that in view of the lighter DLM universe we were shown in the latter half – post Fuller – S1. The answer probably is tied up with where the stories were to go in S3. So as we attempt to get some idea of what plot shifts might have, on the way we have to take into consideration both directions the evidence points to – both the light and dark side of the PTB and what role that might have played both for Rube’s personal history and how his story and George’s and Reggie’s would have played out in S3.

Time scale – We see extremes of time use efficiency and reactions to it.

One extreme is the example of the efficiency expert brought into Delores’ Happy Time office to audit goings on – he uses a stopwatch to measure time spent in the restroom by employees. Another would be the dating get together Daisy attends to find her reap – couples get 2 minutes to talk and decide whether there should be a next step. Mason stung by Rube’s criticism of his reaping sloppiness – a variation on just in time he says – sets out early to find his reap – a bicycle messenger – and wastes most of his day looking for him. Mason’s reap ends up finding him at the postit’s designated street corner almost at the designated time. Roxy finds her reap without much exertion at all at the airport. George tho wins the efficiency prize here among our reaper set. She shows up at her designated street corner to find her reap waiting at a stoplight.

At the other extreme we find the PTB and their reactions to a transgression to their ostensible reaper code some 77 years prior. Rube spends most of his day waiting in a post office line to pick up what he believes is a package, which turns out to be a dead letter – a message of sorts from the PTB to Rube. Some 77 years prior Rube sent a cash filled envelope addressed to Rosie, his daughter – five years old at the time. It seems the PTB’s time scale of response is a patient one. For reasons not made clear in this episode (or this season for that matter) they sidelined the letter at the post office for all this time and it seems very deliberately now decide to return it to Rube. A message perhaps to Rube that they know what he tried to do and that his attempt to help his family failed. Rube shows not a hint of concern for the former part of the message, but is devastated by the latter fact – that the money never arrived. Importantly we the audience aren’t told why this upsets Rube so much.

Post mark on dead letter is November 28 (or 26), 1927

Return address: 1252 Fran****St, Seattle, Wash
Addressed to: Rosie Sofer / 2924 ***** Seattle, Washington

Letter inside has no opening or closing and just reads: ‘Rosie, this is for you and your mother.’

- Why Rube addressed it to Rosie – a five year little girl – and not his wife/her mother is another question raised here and was perhaps to be answered by the unlayering of Rube’s backstory next season.

- Letter was sent same year as Rube died.

- Both he and Lucy/Rosie were in Seattle.

- Since Rube did not know that the letter never arrived it implies that he cut contact off with Rosie (and Lucy) at that time altho his words to the post office clerk – that he knows that they didn’t move (at least during the likely period of delivery) from that address – may mean he was observing from some distance.

- The letter and its dates do not support the plotting idea that Rube maintained contact with his family until Lucy’s death in 1941 (as I proposed earlier altho an imaginative writing team may have had a work around for this barrier). It implies that interaction with the family was completed during a short time period right after the time of his death and cut off when the letter was sent until present day 2004.

-Contact/interaction with Lucy/Rosie may have been as limited as just watching them or as direct as actual interaction with both sides knowing identities. There are probably parallels with what we see in George’s behavior. That Rosie recognized Rube in his reaper form before she died implies prior to the meeting we are shown at her death she had some interaction with Rube in his reaper form. Since Rube did not know the letter never arrived that interaction is most likely to have occurred prior to his sending the letter. However, in a later episode, after the PTB return the letter to him in this episode, Rube finds out where she is living from Penny and it’s possible he went to see Rosie and somehow from that interaction she understood his reaper identity in time to recognize him when he approached her just before she died.

- Whatever happened to persuade Rube to turn his back on contact with his family so completely likely happened in 1927 around the time this letter was sent.

- There’s no name on the return address. And even if there was, Rube is likely to have changed names over the almost 80 intervening years.

- The letter’s return address is not Rube’s current address, which is an apartment vs this letter’s street and house address.

- That the letter was intercepted, held at the post office for 77 years, and then returned to a different return address without any name to identify Rube implies a lot about the nature of the PTB and the extent to which they are actively managing/intervening in the development of all of the reapers. To this point in our story there have been hints that the PTB do intervene, but this particular example takes it to a whole new level changing the interpretation of every action – past and future in all the episodes - in connection with the reapers taken by the PTB. They are still a distant unseen power, but that they knew he sent the letter, intercepted it, and then returned it to him despite the steps Rube took to distance himself from any obvious connection to himself tells us that there’s really not much if anything about the reapers’ activities that the PTB don’t know about, and therefore, their failure to take immediate direct reaction to transgressions cannot be interpreted as ignorance on their part, but a deliberate choice (whatever the reaper characters themselves believe). And, in this DLM universe and the way the stories are told, we, the audience and the reapers, are kept very much in the dark as to the PTB and their motivations and goings on.

They seem to be manipulating Rube (and by extension all the reapers) toward some personal growth or change allowing him to revisit where he left things with his daughter (if not the wife who died in 1941).

As this story unlayers itself this returning of the letter has a huge impact on Rube, but it was just one factor affecting him. His receiving into his care George, whose early reaper growth has parallels with Rube’s early history, and his day to day contention over her own attempts / temptations to get involved with her struggling family just a short distance away - all this had to awaken within Rube his suppressed / compartmentalized memories of his own struggles / temptations regarding his wife and young daughter- as we see in a later episode his dreams begin to affect his sleep later this season.

By the time the PTB drop the letter back in front of Rube basically telling him 77 years after the fact that he failed to give Lucy/Rosie the cash, which based on his reaction they must have desperately needed, they’re opening him up to a renewed sense of guilt about his not helping his family. The family he probably put into a desperate situation when he used the gun we saw in flashbacks to earn his own wanted poster and probably bringing about his death. In 1927 there was no government social support system. Lucy was a young woman born abroad (Czechoslovakia) and as far as we know was not from Seattle and therefore unlikely to have had her own family’s support to fall back upon. And, it’s very likely that Rube’s death would have placed them in very difficult circumstances – a much higher level of stress than George’s death meant to her family, which given she was a teenager stressed her parents and sister probably contributing to their divorce, but was never life threatening.

That the PTB would force upon Rube a reopening of the guilt he must have put away so many years before is an extremely intriguing development, since up to this point in our story, everything we’ve learned about the PTB is consistent with their wanting reapers to stay away from the living and any interference with fated deaths and surrounding events – their own or anyone else’s. This goes even more so for reapers and their living family members, and yet here the PTB are initiating / provoking a reaction in Rube that seems almost certain to push him towards breaking the rules (as both Penny and Roxy point out later to Rube (and to us the audience) when he takes steps to find and make contact with his daughter before she dies).

What is clear is that the motivations/goals of the PTB are much more complicated than anything in the prior episodes led us to believe and the character development and plotting are operating at a more submerged level than the average story told on TV. This is all the more intriguing because from this episode, which seems to reveal a higher patient benevolent side to the PTB, there is also a step up in showing the dark side of being a reaper working for these same PTB. These darker elements keep popping up as the 2nd season progresses and given how they stand out changing direction from the tone set earlier are likely to be an important background intended for the 3rd season.

The return of the cash filled envelope, as mentioned above, is a signal that the third primary theme is there. If my earlier speculations regarding Reggie being the trigger bringing together a real collision between present day events surrounding George/Reggie and Rube’s experiences with his own family, then the producer/writers of the series had to effect a change of tone during the second season and into the third in order to make the danger faced by (likely) Reggie feel anywhere close to real for the reapers involved (and for the audience).

After Fuller’s departure, there was a bit of drift as Fuller’s replacements – Godchaux and Masius - lightened things up – a lot. But in order to make Reggie and George getting together be perceived by the audience as dangerous the happy talk needs to be dialed way back and the dark side of being a reaper – or in our story’s case being one of the living interacting with / learning about reaper existence - has to be dialed up.

If we take Daisy at her words up to now she’s been having a pretty good time ‘interacting’ with the living at no cost whatsoever. And the challenges we’ve seen post Fuller are mostly of a personal nature – coming to terms with personal inconveniences of being undead, but not much indication that a higher power can react in any dangerous way to transgressions. The last really serious threat happened in a Fuller S1 episode when George neglected to reap her mark and Rube, Roxy, and George all convened at the morgue where Rube clearly laid out a threat to George’s existence if she failed to cooperate with expectations.

Looking back over this season’s interactions between Rube and George, we can see there is a growing meaningful interdependent relationship between these two.

In Ep 201 Send in the Clown at minute 42 at the Waffle Haus booth George sits down with Rube and Roxy. Roxy is there to make sure we can see how odd Rube’s objection to George’s promotion is compared to her own, and then leave. Roxy has gotten a huge promotion changing careers moving from meter maid to police officer. This does not bother Rube. However, when George explains she got a promotion, which will get her more money for two days extra per week, Rube objects. Notice that his objection as he explains it to George hinges on her wanting more money, more things. And at this point in the dialogue he calls her Peanut (i.e. his nickname for his daughter), which George rejects.

George: I want to do this. I want more money.
Rube: ‘I want, I want’ Look, Peanut --
George: Don’t call me that.
Rube: I just think that all that wanting is not so good at this point.
And that’s all I have to say about your promotion.
George: Well! As much as I’ve enjoyed this little powwow, I think I’m going to just do what I’m going to do.
(George gets up to leave. Rube’s face betrays he feels totally defeated. )

The writers constructing this have made sure to channel our focus as to causes away from certain obvious reasons. It’s not that her promotion is so big that it would interfere with her reaper duties – not with Roxy’s obviously much bigger promotion up front. Is it that Rube is perhaps overprotective – because he sees her as a daughter and he’s the overprotective father? This is the episode in which George’s finger gets cut completely off and without much fuss she reattaches it and moves on, so it’s reemphasized for us that a reaper including George is pretty much indestructible. The reason seems to tie into her wanting things and money – even modest amounts – is a sensitive issue for Rube. He does see her as a daughter figure of sorts – as evidenced by his calling her ‘Peanut’. And her wanting money sets off something in Rube. Perhaps a connection to the fact Rube seems to have died trying to get more money for his family? Or perhaps it’s connected to the envelope filled with cash he tried to send to his daughter, who was only five years old at the time?

In Ep 202 The Ledger at 41 George, upset about having lost her bike, ends up getting a mustang, but is still down about discovering her parents are getting a divorce. She retreats to the Waffle Haus and at the booth meets Rube, who counsels her. He tells her that the car didn’t come to her because her bike was stolen and that she’s not responsible for her parents divorce. He also talks about his reap that day - a guy George’s age who hungry and wanting some money ended up getting killed over a few dollars he stole.

In Ep 203 Ghost Story there are several interactions between Rube and George. Much of the episode revolves around George getting her thinking recalibrated as to her family relationships. Towards the end at 44 she gets it figured out. While she won’t forget her former living family she sits down among her reaper family with Rube as the father icon at the booth everyone nicely haloed with some warm late afternoon sunlight. No money here, but the family message is strongly asserted thru-out.

In Ep 204 The Shallow End there’s nothing focused between the two, but there is a scene, towards the end at 34, at the booth again George is suffering a little depression from the blowback from her experiments that day in being an *sshole, in which Rube notices her in the dumps and tells her to eat her soup before it gets cold – a little parental hovering.

And in this Ep 205 Hurry Rube is at the booth very down in the dumps contemplating the returned envelope and it’s George who shows up to sit and talk with him for a bit. Rube has been there for a long while and only after talking to George he gets up and starts to move on again.


Dead Like Me Resurrection pending

#43 Danioton

Danioton

    Viper Pilot

  • Full Members
  • Pip
  • 103 posts

Posted 05 May 2012 - 07:11 PM

Ep 205 Hurry continued


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(1) (Introduction - a succession of scenes of George and a few others we will meet later – in particular George’s reap for this episode - a young executive on his way to the airport stuck in traffic and in a hurry – going slowly.)

GVO: When I was a kid life was all about what’s next. I was like ‘7th grade s*cks wait til I’m in 8th grade’. And then ‘f*ck 8th grade high school’s gonna rock’. Life was one big race to get to the next thing. Someone forgot to tell me that the finish line was 18.

There are people who are always on time.
I hate those people.
I was not on time.
Ever.
For anything.
I don’t know what my deal was.
I was late from the start.
Late before the start.

Late was just who I was.
The thing about late is, well, you always feel, rushed.
Late sucks.


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(2) (The entire gang is in their booth at the Waffle Haus where business is booming and the gang can’t get their orders taken by Kiffany. Rube hands out the posits and mentions he’s going to the post office.

The shop talk / chatter revolves around the timing of their reaping – sooner/earlier is better. Mason needs a watch according to Rube.

They all leave but George who stays behind and scores some oatmeal.)

Kiffany: How about some oatmeal this morning?
G: Please! With raisins?
K: On the house, Sweetie. Good things come to those who wait.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(5) (Joy is looking for her keys while Reggie is eating breakfast. Joy pushes oatmeal. Joy also is pushing Reggie to join the band at school.

After Joy leaves, we see Reggie look at her reflection - she’s growing up.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(6) (At the post office Rube finds a very long slow line.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(7) (At Happy Time George lounging at her desk.)

GVO: The nice thing about working at Happy Time was that my day had its own rhythm. Sure things got busy, but the morning was mine. Show up late, stare at screen, swivel chair, sip coffee, repeat. Stare at screen, swivel --

(Delores points out to George an efficiency expert on the premises, sent by the head office, and reveals she has a mole at the head office.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(9) (Joy is at the lawyer’s office to sign the papers to finalize the divorce. Her attorney asks Joy why she is still wearing her wedding band.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(10) (Mason is outside looking for his reap and we see he’s a bit short of being cool when he meets a group of messengers on the street. He steals a bike that he then falls off of.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(11) (At the post office Rube gets trapped behind a talkative woman. He tries to say he speaks no English. He finally decides he’d rather go to the back of the line than stay within her talking range.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(12) (Daisy’s reap turns out to be at a singles dating event – the women sit at small tables and the men move from table to table with two minutes allocated for each encounter. She has to figure out which one is her reap despite the rules - here no last names.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(13) (George is on the phone at Happy Time and gets approached by the efficiency expert.)

GVO: As in “Get the f*ck away from my cubicle!”

GVO: I wanted to ask “Saves time for what?” But I just said


G: Thankyou

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(14) (Daisy at the ‘Make Your Move’ event. Which of these men is her reap? Daisy’s first man is incredibly obnoxious and she uses a painful jiu jitsu move on his fingers to help explain to him her reaction.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(15) (We see George’s reap stuck in traffic in his car getting upset over the delay.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(15) (Mason struggling on the stolen bike looking for his reap.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(15) (At the airport Roxy arrives and begins looking around the baggage pick up for her reap. Using her position as a police officer she commandeers the passenger list to track down her reap, who turns out to be a young French woman, in a hurry and extremely overbearing and obnoxious.)

Roxy: You just need to stay calm.
French Woman: Calm is for losers. I have places to go.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(18) (Daisy runs thru another guy demonstrating some of her social skills handling men.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(19) (At the lawyer’s office with Joy, Clancy shows up with a bag containing Reggie’s band uniform. Before the divorce proceeds – the bad - the two share some good feelings over the band uniform.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(20) (Another guy with a few flaws and Daisy shows she has some insight into people.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(21) (At Happy Time, we see George taking charge and organizing - efficiently. We’re introduced to the soon be fired drunken Ted who here is taskless.)

GVO: I felt a little like Rube handing out postits. Like death, we were on a pretty tight schedule.

GVO: I can’t believe I just said ‘dilly dally’. I feel dirty.


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(22) (At the post office, the talkative lady has made it to the window and demonstrates a complete lack of appreciation for other people’s time as she peppers the post office guy with endless questions with a long line behind her. She asks whether they have the ‘Amelia Earhart’ stamps. Rube overhears and remarks to himself that he reaped her. Given her plane went down somewhere in the vast South Pacific it would be nice to know how he accomplished this and got back to Seattle, but……)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(22) (Mason still struggling.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(22) (At Happy Time the expert is busying watching and timing every little activity including restroom breaks.)

GVO: While everyone may agree that time flies when you’re having fun. It is a little known fact that even when you’re not having fun, time still can fly.

And it flies coach.


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(23) (Back at the post office Rube is still stuck in the line.)

GVO: And even though time knows how to fly, it remembers ….how ……to ……crawl.

(A woman steps in and cuts in to the front of the line. Rube confronts her sending her to the back winning applause from the other people in line.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(24) (Daisy runs thru several more men.)

GVO: It’s been said that time and tide wait for no man. Neither does Daisy.

Daisy: (Daisy take a quick look at one smiling guy) I smell an obsession with UFO’s.
Guy: (laughs good naturedly) I am not obsessed with UFO’s.
D: OK.
Guy: But I did come here in one. A BIG one.
D: (In a whispery voice and a big smile) A BIG one. Wow!

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(25) (At the microwave at Happy Time George intervenes to smooth over a dispute.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(26) (Mason gets knocked on his butt by a woman on the street when he says something to her.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(26) (Roxy at the airport waiting on her reap’s finale gets to know a local airport employee.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(27) (Rube gets to the post office window and receives the 77 year delayed letter and has a very bad reaction. Notice thru-out Rube is so patience personified. And then he finds out that the PTB intervened to side track his letter for ‘almost 80 years’.)

R: I’m here to pick up a package.
Post Office Clerk: I’ll just take a minute.
R: Take two.
POC: Well! This is interesting.
R: What’s that?
POC: This has been in the dead letter office for a while.

(Rube holds the letter in his hands so we can read most of the details:
Post mark on dead letter is November 28 (or 26), 1927
Return address: 1252 Franklin St. / Seattle, Wash.
Addressee: Rosie Sofer / 2724 xxx / Seattle, Wash.)

R: Why didn’t this get to where it was going?
POC: I wouldn’t know that, sir.
R: Well, this was sent a long time ago.
POC: Perhaps the people moved.
R: No, they didn’t move.

(Rube believes he knows that they did not move from that address and yet he did not know they didn’t receive the all important cash. He likely knew where they were for some time after he sent the letter, but did not interact closely enough to know they did not receive the cash.)

POC: I don’t know what happened, sir. I wasn’t there. This is almost 80 years ….80 years old.
R: This is unacceptable.
POC: Sir, it might be unacceptable, but it is the way it is.
It was in the dead letter office. It took a long while to make it’s way back, but now you have it.
R: Well, this is a mistake.
POC: It came back.
R: This is a terrible mistake.
POC: On behalf of the US postal system I apologize for any inconvenience this might have caused you or your family.
R: You have no idea.


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(28) (Daisy finally meets her reap as she focused on redoing her makeup, but he gives her a different last name at first so she doesn’t know it’s him. She actually likes this guy. She writes his name down on the interest card.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(30) (This scene opens with a contemplative George at Happy Time but shifts thru several characters and settings.)

GVO: Everyone says ‘live in the now’.

But that’s b*llsh*t. I mean, who lives in the moment?


(We see Joy at the lawyer’s office taking off her wedding band.)

We’re too busy thinking about what happens next.

Or…..what didn’t happen at all.


(We see Rube sitting in the park on a bench holding the dead letter looking it over.

And then we see George’s reap stuck in traffic - b*tching.

And Roxy reaping her mark at the airport just before she dies dislodging her stuck trunk – successfully, too.)

GVO: Watching a really efficient system in action sometimes just knocks you out.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
GVO: And sometimes it just makes you sick.

(32) (At Happy Time the expert is introducing a new card timecard system to monitor when employees arrive and depart – something that will perhaps make George’s comings (mostly late) and goings (usually early) more difficult to get away with unnoticed.)

GVO: On the clock. Always on the clock. No matter how quickly everyone did their job today, someone somewhere would be punching out before 5:00.

(George walks to her desk where she looks at her postit, which has an ETD of 4:59 PM.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(33) (At the Lass home Reggie is reluctant to show Joy the band uniform before they leave for practice at school.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(34) (Mason still chasing/looking for Herm – his reap.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(34) (Daisy’s name gets put down on a lot of interest cards – very popular. As she looks over her list - not finding her reap’s name – she notices his card with only her name on it on the floor. The scene shifts to the roof where he has already died – accidently it turns out – altho it might look like a suicide to the authorities. Again Daisy handles his transition with skill. She takes him on a ‘date’. But she still is Daisy.)

James: You were the most beautiful woman there.
Daisy: I know.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(36) (Joy drops Reggie off at school – still obsessively overprotective embarrassing Reggie. Reggie pulls the George card on Joy to deflect her advice. In another sign of growing up Reggie announces she wants to get rid of her glasses - so she won’t be called Harry Potter anymore.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(38) (Mason finally finds and reaps Herm Soriano. Oddly Mason can’t or won’t take money he is owed by his reap so close to his death(?))

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(40) (At Happy Time Delores calls George over to thank her for helping to make the day go well with the expert present and then she leaves early for a Dr’s appointment. George finds out Ted got fired and why – he’s been drinking on the job – he pukes right there.)

GVO: When I was alive I didn’t care about time. I didn’t think about it.

(We see Rube sitting alone at the Waffle Haus booth, as the sun sets, studying the dead letter still in its plastic bag unopened.)

And I guess that’s why I was always late.

(As Rube sits at the booth – unmoving as he intently studies and then unwraps the letter – we see everyone in the Waffle Haus moving around him hyper fast.)

But since I died it’s weird. I guess I want to be more….. on time.

(Once again the most important scene / interaction of the episode is at the end. Here Rube opens the envelope with the letter inside reading just ‘Rosie, this is for you and your mother.’

Inside is cash including 100’s and 20’s - a lot of money in 1920’s compared to today’s inflated currency. For a little perspective an ounce of gold was worth $20.64 in 1927. Today as I write this it’s worth about $1,664. If, for example, there is $1,000 in the envelope then in today’s dollars it’s about $81,000 in comparable value. For a single widowed mother with a five year old girl that would have been considerable help getting back on her feet after the disruptive events surrounding Rube’s death.

As Rube is studying the contents, George approaches and sits across from him.)

G: Whoo! What’d you do? Knock over a bank?
R: No.
G: Is this real money?
R: It was.
Many years ago.
G: You OK?
R: Just a long day.
Have you handled your postit yet?
G: I’m on my way.
R: Don’t be late.
G: I won’t be.
(Rube starts to gather things together to leave.)
G: You want a ride home?
R: I’ll walk.
(Rube is so off balanced that he about to leave behind his postit schedule book. George notices and hands it to him.)
G: Rube.
R: Thanks.

(Rube departs leaving George alone in the booth to think over what just happened.

For us even tho not much was said a lot was going on.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(43) (Mason on a bike at the end of his long day.)

GVO: I heard it a million times when I was growing up ‘Hurry up, Georgia!’ ‘Seize the day, Georgia!’

(We see Daisy looking down from the roof at the place where James, her reap, fell to his death.)

And no matter how fast I went, I just kept falling behind.
I just kept getting later and later.

And the whole time I was thinking ‘What’s next?’

I couldn’t wait for ‘What’s next’


(We see a jet flying just overhead perhaps landing at the airport George’s reap is trying to get to. Down below we see Roxy has parked her cruiser and is sitting on the hood watching the planes.)

Maybe people should find just one pretty spot and stay there.

The funny thing is, when you die, everyone refers to you as ‘Late’. But now I know that’s the one event that always happens right on time.


(We see George quietly waiting at the street corner where her reap is to die, and he shows up in a car –license plate reads ‘HART ATTK’ – and has to stop for the red light. He’s still furiously trying to get to the airport and he yells at her to push the ‘walk’ button to try and get the light to change a few seconds faster and when she hesitates he angrily gets out to do it himself – and meets a bus catching the light just as it turns.

Once he’s dead, George offers to guide him, but he wants to sit down and wait a bit.)

G: You can come this way. I’ll show you.
The Man: I’m gonna need a minute.
(They sit down.)
G: Let me know when you’re ready.
The Man: I guess there’s no hurry.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


Dead Like Me Resurrection pending

#44 Danioton

Danioton

    Viper Pilot

  • Full Members
  • Pip
  • 103 posts

Posted 05 June 2012 - 09:50 PM

Ep 206 In Escrow


"Death chooses without blinking an eye. Death doesn’t gather information,
and Death doesn’t ask questions. It just chooses." – Georgia Lass


Daisy: If you can’t decide, give it up to God. Let Him decide.
Mason: I wouldn’t let God decide, George.
George: Why?
Mason: Look how He f*cked us.


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

This episode has a new unwelcome responsibility thrust upon George – she must interview and choose from three candidates for a stressful job at a company. She is stressed just by this choice alone and doesn’t know that whomever she selects will die in a rampage near the episode end, which when it happens really pushes her to a new personal limit. Mason gets to reap an idolized aging rock star from his youth, who will die of a drug overdose in Seattle alone far from London and his family. This run in with the rock star shatters Mason’s image of his past breaking down more of his already fraying mental state – breathing in all the death daily he is finding his limits, too. Daisy, feeling a bit guilty about stealing the cross, seeks out a priest to get some absolution, but the priest doesn’t follow her script disturbing her carefully constructed delusions. Rube is upset about not getting his blueberry pancakes, but seems to be holding up just fine in this episode. Joy and Reggie ‘sell’ the house entering escrow (= uncertainty and purgatory), and meet Angelo, the potential landlord and a new love interest for Joy, before falling out of escrow.

As true for all DLM episodes what goes on within episodes isn’t so important as how it connects to what happens before and after. The various themes, arcs, and characters shift emphasis within each episode to move the larger purposes of the producer/writers in telling the story of what happens to our primary character, George, after she dies.

This episode has an opening nod toward George’s personal development, i.e. her potential love life, as she has an early reap near a young hockey player whom she takes up with at the end – book ending the episode, but this is just marking a little time on this familiar arc in order to devote more of the episode to developing traction with the audience on the more important background theme that the reapers are in a less than fun state of purgatory – or the audience has to be retaught about the dark side of being a reaper in a DLM universe. In this episode both Mason and Daisy are drafted to get this dark side once again dialed up after having let it drop way back early in season one with Fuller’s departure. This dark side hits each of them personally – their specific character growth – and more generally helps us see the nature of the reaper predicament.

They are individuals selected by an unseen power for unknown reasons and held over among the living for an uncertain several decades attending to almost daily deaths to escort the souls to passing over to a fate they are denied any knowledge regarding. Their existence is tightly constrained – no freedom of movement – and they must hide among the living even as they cannot ever participate as one of the living. They do get to keep their memories –if they cooperate – and their personalities – the sense of who they are - is carried over from their former lives, and that means they retain their free will – scope to choose – to do good, or not, to improve themselves, or not, for the duration of their purgatory, caught in limbo, or as the episode is titled ‘In Escrow’. And, just as Joy and Reggie, when a structural flaw has been found in their house, get thrown off of their 45 day scheduled end of escrow - an end which would have marked a passing of sorts into a new life, our reapers have been caught in a uncertain limbo when their scheduled escrow's end got held over perhaps until some sort of personal structural flaw gets fixed.

Going forward this darker background is reflected in significant small points opportunely placed thru-out the episodes and is stressed for the characters as their individual stories are told in the rest of the season. As I’ve speculated before I believe this change of direction has to do with the need to raise the tension for the rest of season two and more importantly to prepare the way for a much more interesting season three when Rube’s back story, George, and Reggie would meet for a story ending resolution.

This episode stands out with its bringing ‘God’ - references thru-out to God - into our story. The George character is also front and center with this new direction, but her situation does not bring God directly into it (altho she alludes to the Bible in her voiceover phrasing) and is more centered on her personal growth as a young reaper. It’s almost as if the PTB are (or God is) deliberately teaching her a very tough lesson.

George is shown very happily adjusted to her reaper existence. She is no longer questioning the rules, but actually taking some pleasure in following them for a change. In the early booth scene she gets some blueberries despite the rules that have denied Rube his blueberry pancakes. She does her reap, a hockey coach, telling him when he asks why him that she doesn’t know – doesn’t make the rules – she just plays by them. She flirts a bit with a young hockey player before heading off to work where we see her enjoying her morning routine – i.e. comfortable with the rules - at Happy Time, when suddenly Delores – always looking to micromanage her ‘life’ –gives her an additional responsibility – she must interview and choose from among three candidates. She struggles with this unasked for and uncomfortable new mental burden and finally later in the episode pushes the choice off onto the Death (the gold frog). Our first warning that there may be a deeper agenda on the part of the PTB (Death or God) hidden from George and from us so far is her voice over observation:

“I wish I could be like Death. Death chooses without blinking an eye. Death doesn’t gather information, and Death doesn’t ask questions. It just chooses.”

The morning of the rampage she is actually euphoric and indulges in some contemplative admiration of her colleagues (Rube, Roxy, Mason, and Daisy) ability to carry out their reaping duties (i.e. follow the rules) without getting caught up in complicated ruminations (she is for now still pretty much ignorant of the deeper rumblings going on within Rube, Mason, and Daisy (no Roxy cracks)). This euphoria continues right up until she sees her job choice show up to report for work (she called him the night before to make sure he would be there) and meet his death. There is also the possibility that the whole rampage could have been avoided if she had only picked a candidate promptly, but this isn’t clear and she has enough personal guilt from her fingering the one to die that morning.

In shock after the rampage she shows up for work where Delores can’t wait to show her a new wall map filled with little flags all around Seattle documenting Happy Time job placements (for George future choices/responsibilities = deciding who might be dying or not). George declines any future such responsibility. George’s former euphoria is now crushed, and she is much older in mind if not body than she was at the mornings start.

In this episode, oddly, given the story telling style of both Fuller and his successors, both Mason and Daisy bring God front and center as do Joy and Angelo and even George who echoes Ecclesiastes in her voiceover narrative. This is not the kindly caring interventionist God we find in ‘Touched by an Angel’, but one more acceptable – probably at the limits of acceptability - to those of a secular humanist mindset comfortable within a Darwinian universe in which any higher powers that might (or not) exist don’t intervene on behalf of the living and in this Fuller imagined universe might (or not) be moved to intervene on behalf of our undead protagonists. Lot’s of ambiguity whereas TBA has none.

Anyway, Mason and Daisy each bring God into our story to tell us that all is not well with each of them in particular and by extension with the reaper condition in general.

Mason in particular has been having problems ‘breathing all that death in’ but has been sustained by an idealized memory of his last few living years when he idolized Gideon Jefferies, the rock star that Mason wanted most to be like. As it turns out Jefferies has exiled himself (involuntarily?) to Seattle far from Britain, his wife, and his kids, and Mason has been chosen by the PTB to be his reaper (not Rube, Roxy, Daisy, or George). Perhaps Mason was put here in Seattle for this very reap given the impact it has on him (and given that the PTB seem to prefer tough love personal lessons for our reapers).

After Gideon dies his comments/observations are used to remind us of Fuller’s original characterization of the reapers – the darker version than what came after his departure – noting that they’ve ‘been hanging around for years. Lurking in the corner.’ Mason’s response that ‘immortality is not all it’s cracked up to be’ is also a revealing reminder pointedly emphasized by Gideon’s comment ‘That’s good to know’. This is Fuller’s vision of the reapers staying on the fringe of the living vs the later episodes, which tend to emphasize George (and other reapers) trying to take back something of the life they lost – to participate rather than just exist on the fringe. These two visions clash a bit and open pathways to different stories and very different character development for the reapers (and their reaps), but going forward the Fuller influenced version will be emphasized.

Daisy interjects God very directly via her visit to a priest stimulated by Roxy’s pointing out the contradiction between Daisy’s recent religious preoccupation and the theft of the cross. Roxy has a double digit advantage on Daisy in IQ points and a steeliness of will that makes Daisy uneasy. Daisy decides to cover herself as best as she can figure by taking advantage of the confessional. Daisy as a reaper knows quite well that there is a higher power and it is logical therefore to try and placate this power as per the rules she’s been studying. Her visit to the priest and her attempts to negotiate away any offense for her actions capture her personality and her long difficult personal struggles that predate her fate as a reaper. The priest rather inconveniently hits too close to home for her:

Priest: I can say the words, but it might be better if you tell me what’s really on your mind.
Daisy: I’m waiting for something.
I don’t know….the cross makes me feel closer to it.
P: Well, whether we’re waiting for someone to say they love us,
Waiting for a check to clear,
Waiting for a man of the cloth to say we’re forgiven,
Grace is passing by us every day, and we know not when the end of our days may be upon us.
D: I know all about that, Father.
I just want my penance, please.


The arcs for George, Mason, and Daisy all converge for the key scene when Mason brings the record holding his remembered perfect music to George and Daisy’s house where George is struggling to decide which of three candidates to choose, and Daisy is relaxing and reveals something about her past.

Not only do we get a healthy dose of God in this episode, but Shakespeare makes his reappearance again. We learn that Daisy played Ophelia in Hamlet in Provincetown ‘six nights a week and twice on Sunday’. (This is a key background point regarding the Daisy character that the Movie later stumbles badly on.) George explicitly tells us that Ophelia is an ‘appropriate’ role for Daisy. It’s not clear what George means by this altho we learn later in the episode that George has read Hamlet and remembered that ‘he couldn’t make a decision and everybody dies’. And perhaps she also remembered that Ophelia’s desperate attempts to find love failed ending in her death – a death that some thought was a suicide others an accident.

Anyway, Mason makes his appearance and with obvious anticipation plays his record of Gideon’s music.

Daisy: What is that dreadful noise?
Mason: It’s uh….a memory of something that doesn’t quite match a memory.
D: Are you drinking tonight?
M: Solid as a priest.
D: You know Georgia? If you can’t decide, give it up to God. Let Him decide.

(Daisy leaves room)

M: I wouldn’t let God decide, George.
G: Why?
M: Look how He f*cked us.


Mason’s compartmentalization breaks down as his current reality and idealized memories of his cherished music clash. And with that comment - Look how He f*cked us - Mason captures his ugly epiphany into the plight of all reapers and not incidentally who/what he sees as the cause.

We’ve left matters with Joy and Reggie to the last here, but they are of growing importance – most particularly Reggie – after the pivoting prior episode with Rube gave us a hint of how his back story and her future might relate. She seems a small character, but knowing what is to come and with the knowledge of the Movie plot details we can see and interpret her evolution with added insight and anticipation for the growth of her character.

In this episode Joy managed to ‘sell’ the house meaning she’s entered escrow, which is defined carefully as a kind of in-between-time like purgatory or limbo so we’ll know that our reapers are themselves in an escrow of sorts. Later in a relaxed conversation between Joy and Angelo, Joy makes a comment again helping us to interpret the meaning of escrow within our larger story.

Angelo: You like the place, tho, right?
Joy: I do, but ….we’re…I’m in escrow. So you know, it’s not a good time to want anything.

This echoes Rube’s earlier comment in the first S2 episode to George warning her about wanting things when he was trying to get her to decline the promotion at Happy Time.

After Joy and Reggie enter escrow they stumble upon a downtown loft for rent and meet their potential landlord, Angelo for the first time, who becomes a love interest for Joy. We learn enough about Angelo to know he is and probably was going to be even more important, but the best parts were for a future season. Angelo has a bit of mystery about him. He’s part black and speaks with an accent – Jamaican? – and is a perfect gentleman or as near saintly as a Hollywood writer can craft.

This might seem at first to be Hollywood reflexively breaking stereotypes (Hollywood has taboos and is more puritan than the Puritans at times) but I think it’s a deliberate thoughtful contrast being set up. Compare Angelo to Ray – the guy who will soon hook up with Daisy in a later episode. Ray has a touch of an evil look and feel about him. He generates as easy a level of distrust as Angelo does trust. Both characters were constructed carefully – not for any interaction between them since Ray meets his end this season (and Angelo’s destiny was in a 3rd season or beyond), but to stimulate something in the audience as the audience reacts to each as it is aware of the other. (The makers of the series on occasion make small technical errors (e.g. Betty’s photo) – but as far as characters and plotting everything is intricately and carefully laid out over episodes. There are shifts of emphasis in the three natural parts – I Fuller’s episodes – II Rest of S1 – III S2 – in which characters evolve and plots change direction, but no accidents.)

The scene in which Angelo first shows the loft apartment to Joy and Reggie stands out because of some very odd dialogue – something that was probably to be explained next season, but intentionally planted here for service in future plots. He knows things that he shouldn’t know given this is the first time he meets Joy and Reggie.

The first comment is slight and signaled with a modest pause and by itself not too significant since one could rationalize that he guessed it. It’s his comment that Reggie doesn’t like anything. But the second one is unmistakably signaled with a longer pause and there’s no explanation - it’s when he says he likes Golden Retrievers when he couldn’t know that JD is a Golden Retriever.

Later Angelo and Joy get together at night for her to see the loft and he is drawing her capturing her ‘sadness’ as she thinks about how everything set up in her life to go right went so wrong. It reminds him of Ecclesiastes from the Bible which he proceeds to quote and which Joy recognizes.

Angleo: She has a baby sitter. She’s safe. Why you worry so much?
Joy: Why worry? Right.
Two great girls……house in a nice neighborhood…..the teacher….you make all the right choices…and things fall apart.
Angelo (quoting): ‘I made me great works. I builded me houses. I planted me vineyards. And behold all was vanity and vexation of spirit.’
J: Ecclesiastes.
A: Right.
J: That’s the one part of the Bible I remember. It was all about lists. I find lists very comforting.
‘A time to live…a time to die…’

A: There it is. There’s that sadness.
J: I want this apartment. I want this life.

And finally Joy and Reggie in their interaction bring attention to the changes in their relationship initiated by Reggie as she evolves in her thinking about George and this in turn forces Joy to react. Joy has all the advantages in this struggle and still Reggie wins as we will see by the time we reach the final cemetery scene of S2.

We see Joy talking on the phone at home as she finds out that escrow has fallen thru due to a hidden crack in the roof. We get the first mention of Joy’s mother - soon to make an appearance. When Reggie says she misses ‘her’ Joy misunderstands asking if she means her grandmother, but Reggie refuses to allow the unacceptable misunderstanding to stand and says ‘HER’ and Joy then knows it’s George.

When Reggie explains that they shouldn’t move because then ‘she’ wouldn’t be able to find them, Joy is disturbed. Despite Reggie’s mistake of the night before Reggie is confident that George is still around – something impossible and unacceptable to Joy. To Joy it means Reggie has a mental problem, which needs fixing. The maneuvering around this point between Joy and Reggie will continue thru the rest of S2. It’s important to the story arc and probably would have become more prominent in S3 as Reggie despite all the establishment figures in her life telling her that George being around can’t be true, she will/would have followed the evidence to its logical end – a meeting with George. The brief get together in the cemetery with George leaving her some candy before hurrying away would have been just a stepping stone in a longer arc instead of the capstone for the series it turned into.

The Movie tries to pick this aspect up - the meeting between Reggie and George - but with the limited time, without the Rube backstory dimension for contrast, and with the people making the decisions a bit weak as to what these characters and story are about (IMO), the Movie had to fall short of the potential set up by the first two seasons.
Dead Like Me Resurrection pending

#45 Danioton

Danioton

    Viper Pilot

  • Full Members
  • Pip
  • 103 posts

Posted 05 June 2012 - 09:52 PM

Ep 206 In Escrow continued

(1) (We see George entering the Waffle Haus to join her colleagues at the booth. As she enters we hear ballroom dancing music and see an older couple dancing past George.)

GVO: When I was a kid I took ballroom dancing. My Mom said it would stay with me for life, but all I remember is one-two-three, one-two-three.

(A few threads are running thru this scene that get bounced around later. Note how happy George is with her muffins. Rube is frustrated by rules for the sake of rules – the problem in his case - no blueberries for his pancakes. Kiffany explains she doesn’t make the rules. Roxy and Daisy spar over oddly juxtaposed sets of rules. Daisy is playing with following her Catholic rules while feeling comfortable with stealing and keeping the cross from one of her earlier reaps. Roxy in her police enforcer role wants Daisy to give the cross back. Rube just wants blueberry pancakes.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(3) (George’s reap is at an ice-skating rink where we see a hockey team practicing under the direction of a coach who George will shortly reap. George flirts a bit with one of the players. She will go back to the rink at the end of the episode to follow up with him.)

(George identifies the coach as her reap.)

GVO: Mama, I’m coming home.

(And, the appointed time draws near.)

Times up. Gotta go.

(As the coach meets his end….)

He shoots…..he does not score.

(After the coach dies his soul / ghost appears next to George.)

Coach: Am I dead?
G: As dead as I’ve seen in a while.
C: Are you dead?
G: I was killed about a year ago, so I’m dead…ish.
C: Why was I killed?
G: I don’t know. I don’t make the rules. I just play by’em.

Chalk it up to bad timing, Coach. Come on.

GVO: Life and death was kind of a game. Kind of like ‘Duck, Duck, Goose.’
Duck, Duck, Dead. We’re all just a step away from that dreaded tap on the head.


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(5) (George at Happy Time is decidedly not working at her desk as Delores catches her, and gives her a big decision to make. She has to choose from among three candidates for a high pressure job at a pharmaceutical company.)

GVO: We’re all just trying not to get caught.

D: Millie, Millie, Millie. Have you finish anything this morning?
G: Actually I did finish something.

GVO: Someone.

D: Big assignment, Millie. We’ve got a new pharmaceutical’s account. They’re about a week from a major drug launch. They’re terribly in need of a top-notch staffer. Got that?

GVO: Blah, blah, type memo, go get a mocha, send memo.

G: Got it.
D: These are the three applicants you have to choose from.
G: Back up. Did you just say ‘choose, me’.
D: No, I said, ‘you, choose’.
You’re in a new position now.
Like the prettiest girl at the prom, or the sluttiest girl, if you went to Catholic school. You get to pick.
G: What if I’m neither?
D: Decisions must be made. Winners……make decisions, Millie.

GVO: Winners make decisions. But nothing before my mocha, Breakfast of Champions.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(6) (At the Lass household, we see Joy signing papers with the real estate agent – the same one that showed George around the house - and celebrating that the house has been sold, sort of. It’s now in escrow, which is defined carefully so we’ll know that our reapers are themselves in an escrow of sorts.)

Reggie: So, are we rich?
Agent: I usually suggest holding off on the celebration until closing escrow.
R: What’s ‘escrow’?
A: Well, it’s a kind of in-between-time. It’s like……
R: Purgatory? Limbo?

(Escrow will last 45 days during which time Joy and Reggie have to find a new place to live.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(7) (We see Mason approaching an apartment door passing another bloke who’s carrying what appears to be a postit with writing. He confronts the guy, but it turns out other people use postits too. We learn the guy in the apartment is selling his used records – vintage British thing. The apartment has Mason’s reap – an aging rocker – who it turns out is Mason’s idol from his younger days in England. He doesn’t recognize the guy at first.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(8) (George is interviewing the first of the three candidates at Happy Time – Michael – he of the extreme gaseous state. We’ve gotten a bit far away from the Shakespeare inspiration here, but…..)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(9) (Mason is at the soon-to-die old rocker’s place going thru his collection of old albums. Every album Mason pulls out the old man says anything but that one. Finally Mason pulls out an album of a time and place Mason was at - ‘The Church Yard at Wembley, 1965’. Mason doesn’t yet connect this present old geezer to his then rock hero.)

Mason: (holding the album) I know they did not do live recordings of this show, mate.
Gideon: The band made their own.
M: Yeah….you knew somebody in the Church Yard.. f*ck *ff!
(Mason finally gets the connection when he compares the postit name to the album cover.)
M: Did ya?
G: All my life.
M: Bloody Hell. Bloody Hell.. you’re Gideon Jeffries.
G: Don’t tell me you’re another long lost child of some groupie, because I’m tapped out. Why don’t you try Jagger...he’s still touring.

(Mason is beside himself with awe to be in the presence of The Gideon Jeffries.)
M: I...I….I’m just such a tremendous bloody fan of yours, man. I mean this wasn’t even a concert, was it? It was ….It was…..a f*cking miracle.
G: That concert was 40 years ago. You’ve got to be thinking about something else, mate.
M: Yeah.. my uncle used to reminisce about it all the time. Didn’t shut up about it.
G: Your uncle?
(Chinese delivery arrives with a knock at the door.)

G: What did you say your name was?
M: Mason.
G: I used to be Gideon Jeffries.
M: I remember.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(12) (We see Joy and Reggie downtown Seattle crossing a street and discussing lily pads. They notice a ‘For Rent’ sign.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(12) (We see George interviewing the Dr from Chechnya who has had a lot of experience handling work related pressure - e.g. electrodes attached to his testicles.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(13) (Joy and Reggie with their potential landlord, Angelo, in a very roomy apartment. This guy has a bit of mystery about him. He’s part black and speaks with an accent – Jamaican? – and is a perfect gentleman.

This isn’t Hollywood reflexively breaking stereotypes. Compare this guy to Ray – the guy who will hook up with Daisy in a later episode. Both characters were constructed carefully – not for any interaction between them since Ray obviously meets his end this season, but to stimulate something in the audience as the audience reacts to each and is aware of the other.

This scene stands out because of some very odd dialogue that attaches the mystery to him – something that was probably to be explained next season, but intentionally planted here in anticipation. He knows things that he shouldn’t know given this is the first time he meets Joy and Reggie.

Joy and the man are talking down stairs in front of a window while Reggie is running around upstairs.)

Joy: So is it, um….Is it safe down here?
Angelo: Well during the day everybody rushes around with their work. And during the night everybody rushes around with their play. So you can be by yourself, but you’re never alone.
J: Hmm. That sounds nice.
A: So, is it just the two of you?
J: Yep, that’s what it is.
Reggie: (Stops and from above) My room’s huge. Do you allow dogs?
A: You’re not allowed to move in without one.
R: Cool. (She runs off.)
A: I guess she likes it.
J: Seems that way.
A: She doesn’t like anything. (First shoe – faintly odd piece of dialogue.)
(Uncomfortable pause by Joy - his comment is intrusive - how does/would he know that about Reggie?)
So did you sell your place on Beatrice lane?
J: (Recovering) I’m in escrow.
A: You know what you need to do? You need to cruise by, check out the neighborhood at night, see if you like it.

R: (Appears again and speaks from upstairs) Your room has a fireplace in it, and a view of the sound.
A: Hey, what’s the name of your dog?
R: J.D.
A: J.D. What’s JD stand for?
R: Just Dog.
A: Just dog…
(laughs with Joy, and then the other shoe drops much louder / much quieter longer pause.)
I like Golden Retrievers.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(15) (At Waffle Haus Roxy is confronting Daisy in a window booth about her theft of the cross from her recent reap of the old lady. Roxy’s comment about the cross burning a hole thru to Daisy’s spine probably is what spooks Daisy to go get some insurance / penance / absolution from the priest later – just in case. After all Daisy is very well aware that there is a higher power and there is an after something even if she doesn’t know the details.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(16) (At Happy Time George is telling Crystal and Delores about her first gassy interviewee, when the third of the three candidates – an older woman whose parents recently both died freeing her to return to the work force – shows up.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(17) (Mason with Gideon Jeffries are discussing the power stance. Gideon is about to die and Mason reaps him. Mason keeps up his pretense of his uncle right up till he dies. Mason wants to know if he ever got to his ultimate his high. Something Mason has an idealized memory of his own pursuit when he was still alive and kicking.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(19) (We see George at Happy Time trying to pick from the three people. She gets a gift – a foul smelling food from the Dr – and an odd email from the woman.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(20) (Mason and Gideon who is now a newly dead soul are having a comfortable discussion - Mason is getting honest answers from his rock idol before he passes over and the answers are the start of an unraveling of what he thought he knew about himself and his idealized rock past.

This scene is used to help push us back toward a darker view of the situation reapers find themselves in, and to push Mason into a confrontation with his idealized memories and a reevaluation of his own view of himself as a reaper.

Gideon’s inability to control his impulsive behavior – drugs, women – resulted in his wife leaving him and the loss of his family, which is why he died alone, from a drug overdose, and far from his home and family. Far more than Mason ever got in life, but…..

The two move over so that we can see both of them standing and Gideon’s body sitting on the toilet seat with the needle in his arm.)

Gideon: I always blamed the drugs. They made me feel….defiant….fearless….immortal.
M: You are immortal. You made music. You live forever.
G: I beg to differ. (He looks at his body.)
M: So embarrassing, but I…I wanted to be you so badly. I was uh…I was there.
The Church Yard Live, 1965, at Wembley
G: How old are you?
M: The same age as….as I was then.
G: I’m beginning to get this. You’ve just been hanging around for years. Lurking in the corner.
M: Yeah. Immortal. It’s not all it’s cracked up to be.
G: That’s good to know.


(Gideon takes us back to Fuller’s original characterization of the reapers – the darker version than what came after his departure – noting that they’ve ‘been hanging around for years. Lurking in the corner.’ This is Fuller’s vision of the reapers staying on the fringe of the living vs the later episodes, which tend to emphasize George (and other reapers) trying to take back something of the life they lost – to participate rather than just exist on the fringe. These two visions (from among several options) clash a bit and open pathways to different stories and very different character development for the reapers (and their reaps).

Gideon has one last request – that Mason remove the needle so his kids never see a picture of his drug induced death. Mason, oddly given his usual regard for rules, explains he’s not supposed to interfere, but agrees. Gideon, now that he’s dead, gives Mason one last look at his power stance something he pointedly declined to do earlier.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(23) (We see Daisy – perhaps pushed by Roxy’s words regarding God’s displeasure with her stealing the cross – in a confessional box with the priest we, and she, will see again.

Her attempts to negotiate away any fallout from her theft and this whole conversation with the priest capture her personality and her long difficult struggle with her fate as a reaper. And again, together with Mason’s scene earlier this episode, is deliberately pushing the audience towards revisiting (since Fuller’s early episodes) the darker side of the purgatory (or escrow of sorts with lots of uncertainty as to the final closing of the deal) that reapers find themselves stuck in.

Daisy’s 75 years comment would include a good 10 years of her short life too so maybe she’s trying to obtain cover for all her adult sinning on top of the recent cross stealing transgression. Notice how she strives to answer his questions as honestly as she can manage, but is forced to twist matters)

D: Forgive me Father. I have sinned. It’s been 75 years since my last confession.
Priest: How is that possible?
D: It feels like 75 years.

P: What would you like to confess, my child?
D: Petty larceny, and from a very unpleasant woman.
So how many Hail Marys, and Our Fathers is that?
P: What did you take?
D: A necklace ……with a cross on it.
I needed it.
P: And this person you took the cross from, did not?
D: (with feeling) No.
P: Why not?
D: She was dead.
P: That is when we need it the most.
D: Why don’t we say….10 Hail Marys… and 4 Our Fathers.. and we’ll call it absolved.
P: Wouldn’t you rather talk about why you felt the need to steal a cross from a dead woman?
D: Uhh, I think the act speaks for itself.
So how about my penance?
P: What’s your name?
D: Daisy. Daisy Adair.
Now….how about that penance?
P: I can say the words, but it might be better if you tell me what’s really on your mind.
D: I’m waiting for something.
I don’t know….the cross makes me feel closer to it.
P: Well, whether we’re waiting for someone to say they love us,
Waiting for a check to clear,
Waiting for a man of the cloth to say we’re forgiven,
Grace is passing by us every day, and we know not when the end of our days may be upon us.
D: I know all about that, Father.
I just want my penance, please.

P: Bless you my child. Two Hail Marys and an act of contrition.
D: I have to go.

(Daisy has been waiting a very long time for someone to say he loves her - ouch. There’s no comedy in her response to the Father’s comment when she says ‘I know all about that, Father.’)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(25) (George at Happy Time still unable to decide among the three candidates.)

GVO: I was finding that the best way to avoid taking responsibility …..was to avoid the person who gave you the responsibility.

I’m so f*cking smart I scare myself.


G: Oh! (George bumps into Delores who is no dummy herself in dealing with people avoiding responsibility.)

GVO: How did you do that?

(Delores drags George over to her desk to listen to a very upset client, Ned, wanting his new employee now. The pressure is on George, and she wrangles a bit more time.

Interrupting is the arrival of another gift – a rabbit. And soon after the gassy Michael shows up to tell her about his new medicine. He points out to her the rabbit is a bit gassy too.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(27) (Joy and Reggie discussing Joy’s ‘date’ that night to look over the loft apartment, and that Reggie will have a baby sitter.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(28) (George begs for another night from Delores to make her decision. George is left in the office to agonize over her choices as everyone else leaves for home and their TV’s etc. As Delores leaves she tells George that she’s in charge.)

GVO: I didn’t want to be in charge. I wanted to go home and stare at my TV. Being in charge was the loneliest feeling ever.

(She sees Crystal leave with the rabbit.)

All right, the second loneliest.

(The lights go out.)

I’m not going home. I’d just channel surf all night anyway. Can’t make a decision about anything.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(28) (Reggie sitting in the Lass house with her babysitter, who doesn’t stay long. Reggie tries to establish a rapport with the older girl, but fails to get much reaction until she brings up her dead sister who she says died skydiving. The girl’s friends knock at the door and she deserts her post to be with her friends leaving Reggie alone.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(30) (Joy is with Angelo on the roof getting to know the neighborhood and him. He pushes her a bit about the apartment and she explains that she’s in escrow – not a time to want anything.)

Angelo: You like the place, tho, right?
Joy: I do, but ….we’re…I’m in escrow. So you know, it’s not a good time to want anything.

(One theme connecting the foundations in this episode and among episodes is the highlighting of ‘escrow’ or purgatory or a state of in between that our reapers find themselves in and so this comment Joy makes about her escrow can be applied as a judgment or constraint on all the reapers. It echoes Rube’s earlier comment in another episode to George about her wanting things.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(31) (Reggie at home alone watching old horror movies, which is not a good idea as it stirs up her imagination as to her own personal haunting. She soon convinces herself that outside noises are George.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(31) (Angelo and Joy - he’s drawing her and as she contemplates her life he captures a ‘sadness’ he sees in her face. Angelo quotes from the Bible - Ecclesiastes – God enters again.

A: She has a baby sitter. She’s safe. Why you worry so much?
J: Why worry? Right.
Two great girls……house in a nice neighborhood…..the teacher….you make all the right choices…and things fall apart.
Angelo (quoting): ‘I made me great works. I builded me houses. I planted me vineyards. And behold all was vanity and vexation of spirit.’
J: Ecclesiastes.
A: Right.
J: That’s the one part of the Bible I remember. It was all about lists. I find lists very comforting.
‘A time to live…a time to die…’


A: There it is. There’s that sadness.
J: I want this apartment. I want this life.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(33) (Reggie at home scaring herself silly – she ends up calling 911.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(33) (Opens with George and Daisy at home at night discussing which of three employees George must choose from for a job placement by Happy Time.

This scene builds on Mason’s reap earlier and Daisy’s confession to dial up the dark side of what it is to be a reaper. Here is where Mason’s compartmentalization snaps as his current reality and idealized memories of his cherished music clash. For Daisy, we see her in this relaxed state relating a bit of her past, which informs us she in fact has some real acting experience - on stage - Hamlet no less – and perhaps we’re given a bit more insight about her personality - she played Ophelia, which George makes sure we know is an ‘appropriate’ role for her.)

G: I’m making everyone unhappy. Everyone hates me. All of these people. Pharmaceutical Ned - you should have heard on the phone today – he really hates me.
D: Why on Earth is this so hard for you?
G: Because they all want it, and they all can handle it. But…who to choose? How to choose?
D: You sound like Hamlet.
G: What do you mean I sound like Hamlet?
D: All that indecision. I was Ophelia in Provincetown.
G: Seems appropriate. Ophelia was the one who drowned, right?
D: Ya. Six nights a week and twice on Sunday.


(knock at door)

D: That’s Mason’s knock.
G: (OK) …..Allow me.

M: Hey. Rube called. .. ah. Group reap tomorrow. Ah.. dress code is business casual.
G: You couldn’t have called?
M: Oh, I wanted to play a record.
G: What’s wrong with your stereo?
M: Well, the crack head I sold it to has it.

(a horrid noise comes from record player)

D: What is that dreadful noise?
M: It’s uh….a memory of something that doesn’t quite match a memory.
D: Are you drinking tonight?
M: Solid as a priest.
D: You know Georgia? If you can’t decide, give it up to God. Let Him decide.

(Daisy leaves room)

M: I wouldn’t let God decide, George.
G: Why?
M: Look how He f*cked us.


(‘God f*cked us reapers.’ No small change from either Fuller or what came after in S1.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(35) (Joy returns home to find a police car with its lights on. There’s a growing togetherness for these two even as Joy has to make way for Reggie’s growing personal willpower - Reggie sleeps in Joy’s room that night.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(38) (George at home with her choices in front of her on the table. She decides to let Death / the gold frog decide.)

GVO: Sometimes I can’t hear my own voice. I wish I could be like Death. Death chooses without blinking an eye. Death doesn’t gather information, and Death doesn’t ask questions. It just chooses.

(George is getting an unwelcome lesson in the choices that Death/God/the PTB make everyday and that George takes for granted since she’s found her comfort zone in just following the rules.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(38) (At the Waffle Haus, the reapers are organizing for their group reap. George is a bit on the euphoric side – happy with her decision of the night before – unaware of what Death has in store for her. She must have called and her choice is on his way to work this morning.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(39) (Joy talking on the phone at home with the agent. She finds out that escrow has fallen thru due to a structural flaw – a crack in the roof – that will need to be fixed before it can sell. We get the first mention of Joy’s mother - soon to make an appearance. When Reggie says she misses ‘her’ Joy misunderstands asking if she means her grandmother, but Reggie refuses to allow the unacceptable misunderstanding to stand and says ‘HER’ and Joy knows it’s George. When Reggie explains that they shouldn’t move because then ‘she’ wouldn’t be able to find them, Joy is disturbed.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(41) (We see the entire reaper gang outside Lunateca for their group reap pretending to be taking a smoking break. George is preoccupied at first getting used to smoking, but she soon begins reflecting on her colleagues attitudes and approaches to their reaping duties. George up to this point has adjusted well to her reaper duties. She understands that the choices as to who will or will not die are not her choices and she’s OK with that – she’s come to terms with just following the rules – reaping and escorting whomever Death sends her way. These reflections will contrast with her realization towards the end of the scene that her choosing from among the three was sending one to their death. Her choice of the three had to die this morning. This is something she’s not OK with.)

GVO: Timing…..Daisy had it in spades. She didn’t stop to wonder why one guy got it and not another. It was his time ....that’s all.

(We see the reapers locating their quarry and taking souls one after another.

The Dr Plotnick, who survived so much in Chechnya, shows up for his first day at the new job and greets George thanking her for choosing him, and Rube reaps him right there. George then realizes her suddenly much more active role in Death’s machine - choosing who is to die when and where.)

GVO: I actually read ‘Hamlet’ in high school. The guy can’t make a decision, and everybody dies.

(She may be thinking that only if she had made a decision sooner, then Ned might not have snapped and gone on his killing rampage.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(43) (George goes on into work and we see her at the elevator, where Delores catches her – her usual happy upbeat self. George looks like she’s on the way to a firing squad.)

GVO: I am Hamlet, and everybody dies.

(Delores wants to show her a job placement board with hundreds of little colored pins representing all of the job placements Happy Time has made - for George they represent hundreds of future potential decisions she – if she stays this new course Delores has placed her on – will be making.

As a very subdued George is explaining to Delores she doesn’t want the new responsibilities her phone rings and as George moves away we see Delores getting the news of the deadly rampage at Lunateca that morning.)

GVO: To everything there is a season. A time to stay, and a time to get the h*ll out.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(45) (George at the hockey rink where she reaped the coach at the beginning of the episode. We come full circle and end on a positive note as she affirms that for her she will continue moving forward.

GVO: And for now, it’s still hockey season. It seems to me you can have someone tell you what to do with your life, or you can look somewhere else for answers.

(We see George watching from off the ice the player we saw at the beginning of the episode. He’s here alone practicing - ice is empty.)

It’s like you have to figure out where your gut is and then go with it.

It sure beats standing around the punch bowl with the rest of the losers.


(George moves out on the ice and introduces herself to the guy, and they slowly skate away.)

Seems to me you either show up at the dance, or you just stay home.

One-two-three. One-two-three…..

Dead Like Me Resurrection pending

#46 Danioton

Danioton

    Viper Pilot

  • Full Members
  • Pip
  • 103 posts

Posted 07 September 2012 - 10:04 PM

Ep 207 Rites Of Passage

“We are born.
We die.
We rot.
It’s all one big cosmic joke.” - Father Mathias

“I died in 1938……..
So now I stay here and I help other people go.
And they do go somewhere. I know that much.
I don’t know if there’s a Heaven or a Hell. But I believe…..there’s more.
My whole life - my whole death - shows me there’s more.
I just don’t know what it is.” - Daisy Adair

“I was dead.
And now I’m not.
I’m a Grim Reaper.
I take people’s souls before they die.” - Mason

“Do you know when you’re p*ss drunk and you collapse on the floor, and someone comes to wake you up because the police are just about to arrive, yeah?
Well, I’m that someone.
And at first….they don’t know where they are, or who they are, and they’re a little bit confused.
Well, that’s why I’m there, cause I’m there to…I’m there to reassure them. I’m there to …make them believe everything’s all right.” - Mason

“It’s one thing to show up, take the soul, get on with your afterlife.
You can think of yourself like some kind of…..accident.
But when you have to work at it, it feels more like…..murder.” -Georgia Lass


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

In the ‘Rites of Passage’ the most visible arc up front is George’s reaping a celebrity (Kyle Lowerdeck) – a Very Important Person Reap –a rite of passage for her – a nod from upper management – the Powers That Be – of approval of her performance as a reaper. The celebrity’s death attracts a lot of attention from the living as opposed to the many other every day deaths the reapers handle (e.g. George’s death the year before – Friday, June 27th 2003) and in the George VoiceOver this contrast becomes the surface theme bookending this episode.

This episode is notable because it appears to bolt this primary senior arc – George’s struggles getting access to her celebrity reap – onto another less obvious set of junior arcs that work together smoothly to move something of the real series themes forward. It’s likely that the surface celebrity story was suggested to the writing team by the studio/network ptb as a ‘shiny object’ attempt at something they thought more likely to attract higher ratings. It doesn’t connect well with anything that has come before or is to come after, and it doesn’t provide any new development of the main character George. It does nicely exemplify the most extreme episode in terms of humanizing the reapers and very far from anything likely contemplated by Fuller.

The post Fuller creative team put a higher emphasis on emotional goals and twists for the characters than on staying within the DLM universe boundaries and as they decided to take the characters in new directions the DLM universe and its boundaries were pushed and pulled as needed vs fixing the rules and working the characters and their arc trajectories within those limits. This can be good for short term audience satisfaction but is dangerous for longer term sustainability as it risks losing the audience who generally expect the writers to stay within stable rules. They took some risks with the rules in the series and succeeded IMO for the two seasons, but pushed things too far in the Movie and lost some connection with the core fans.

Until we run into the Movie the sometimes radical shifts are done so smoothly that to the casual viewing eye following the engaging stories and characters everything feels fine. However, I suspect that Fuller would not have willingly shifted his DLM universe boundaries in anything like what we got and that would have made for a very different second season. It’s surprising that things turned out as well as they did.

Anyway, of the three main series themes (George’s reaction to her death and attempts to recover some of what she’s lost, her and her family’s reaction/interactions, and the third newer emphasis among George, Rube, and Reggie) this episode is exploring one aspect supporting the third - how the living react to knowledge of reapers and their business – as we watch the end of Daisy’s arc with the Priest, we see Mason’s interaction with a band of Death obsessed Goth types –one Girl in particular, and we observe the beginning of a two episode arc with Reggie’s Grandma.

Reggie is growing as a key character in the ongoing DLM story and she is well on her way to becoming an equal in a three way triangle - George, Rube, and Reggie.

Here in this episode the writers are answering a question briefly raised and then left alone since episode 107 ‘Reaper Madness’ when another of the living (Ronnie Dobbs) got a little peek into reaper business. The question focuses on why the living cannot know about reapers, and it’s done here probably so that later as Reggie gains more knowledge during her tracking down of George we, the audience, will appreciate the dangers and the complications ensuing as she gets closer to success – a meeting with George – something the PTB probably would not normally allow – a meeting in which she knows who George is. Tsk, tsk the PTB might say to that happening (echoing Daisy’s gentle reaction to a modest transgression of the Priest – see below).

Ronnie could see gravelings and noticed that George could see them too. His interpretation as to what was going on was off, but his odd little run in with George did bring about two conversations in that episode between Rube and George that told us a bit as to how the PTB and the reaper authorities (in this case Rube) view the living knowing about their activities in the DLM universe.

At minute 16 of ep 107 in the DVD after a reap by George had some complications Rube and George are in Rube’s apartment. This conversation is a big change from George’s uncooperative behavior regarding reaps. Here George is bringing a potential problem to Rube to discuss before it blows up in her (and by extension Rube’s) face - The discussion’s a little rough, but a rapport is beginning to form between these two.

R: You got sloppy. He’s seen you on the scene one too many times.
G: He knew the guy was gonna die.
R: You said the guy on the bike died.
G: He knew someone was gonna die.
G: So you talked to him?
R: He talked to me. I …talked back.
R: Young fella?
G: Young enough.
R: Sloppy.
G: What the h*ll was I supposed to do?
R: Not be sloppy!
G: I know this is cliché to hate your boss, but you’re a real d*ckweed.
R: You know what you’re feeling right now? The rage and frustration all knotted together? Binding everything from your head to your digestive tract? That’s my life with you.
G: The guy talked to me. What was I supposed to do?
R: Steer clear of people. We’re undead, Peanut. Undead are meant to exist on the fringe of the living world. We’re facilitators - not participants.


This view of reapers and their place among the living is heavily influenced by Fuller’s original vision (if not actually his vision carried over and into this episode). Rube’s side of the dialogue reveals that reapers have to be careful about being observed around the deaths they reap by the survivors and it’s clear that pretty much any communication is frowned upon. Fuller’s vision as reapers on the fringe is still deeply embedded in ep 107, but by episode 207 the writers want us to see the reapers more as participants – i.e. less undead and more humanized, despite some problems this causes (likely problems Fuller was trying to avoid by keeping the reapers ‘on the fringe of the living world’ and ‘not participants’- but that’s for a later discussion).

And here is another conversation from same episode 107.

(30) Rube and George are in a Waffle Haus booth discussing Ronnie again. George has already come a long way - she’s making herself here part of the solution vs the problem – talking things over with Rube.

G: I didn’t just pick the guy up. He said he could see gravelings. You can’t get mad at me for that.
R: Do I look mad?
G: A little.
R: Thank you (to waitress)
Do you have any idea what would happen if the living caught word that we are here? Among them, breaking bread? It would up end the world. Believe me, you do not want to be responsible for that kind of biblical panic.
G: I didn’t tell him anything!
R: You didn’t mention that you were a reaper?
G: No!
R: You didn’t talk about gravelings?
G: I said that I could see them too. That’s all!
He thinks they’re Death.
R: He told you he’s schizophrenic?
G: He said he was on medication for seeing things.
R: Well, maybe what we really have is a mentally unstable young man who thinks you’re the cat’s meow.
G: Oh, so this is all some plot on his part to get in my pants.
R: Peanut, all men are liars where pretty girls are implicated.
You can see they’re noses growing.
Trust me.
G: So, you think I’m pretty?

What does Rube mean ‘that kind of biblical panic’? In this episode 207 we get some idea and the answers are surprising. Episode 207 explores the reactions of several people to knowledge of reapers in an evolved post Fuller vision of the DLM universe. Here we have Grandma, Joy, Bandar and the Bandar Girl, and the Priest - all are brought on stage to fill out what Rube might have meant in saying ‘biblical panic’ and ‘It would up end the world’.

We meet Reggie’s Grandma (by way of Joy) who shows up to inspect the flawed roof that knocked Reggie and Joy out of escrow in the last episode. Notice how intentionally different the Joy and Grandma personalities and their opposite worldviews are presented to us, and yet both when they get a little exposure to what Reggie thinks about George’s whereabouts react in the same way – both think that Reggie has a mental problem that needs fixing. The possibility that she could be correct as she interprets various facts she comes across in her assessment that George is still around is simply not possible for either.

Joy’s reactions are really over the whole of the two seasons and Grandma is here in part to contrast with Joy and perhaps Bandar’s entourage in this episode.

Bandar and the Girl are entirely contained within this episode. Perhaps in a 3rd season we would have had the loose end the Girl represents closed up – like Ronnie she can possibly sense something of the other side, she saw a lot, and escaped firmly convinced of the reality of Grim Reapers among the living. Finally, Daisy’s arc with the Priest ends here. The Priest’s reaction shows another dangerous side of the potential for ‘biblical panic’ mentioned by Rube altho the panic would more likely rest with the secular humanists of the world as the ‘Touched by an Angel’ crowd would dispense with talk of faith once they had concrete evidence of a soul and an after existence and quickly bump the secular humanist sympathizers from the centers of power.

Note that Grandma and Bandar and the Girl are a bit delusional about their relationship with Death and the other side. Both meet up with more or less some evidence of the real thing. Bandar is rubbing elbows with a real undead reaper and tho he doesn’t understand he and his crowd come to intuit that Mason really does represent Death in some way. Grandma will soon with a shock realize that Reggie is serious about her views that the dead, George, really can come back. This is too much for her to recognize and she wants to put Reggie into therapy rather than believe it could be true when Reggie trusts her and tries sharing some information. Note how incessantly Grandma (and Bandar and the Bandar Girl) talks about her connections to and knowledge of the other side, but fails when confronted with even a tiny bit of that other side (and in the case of the Bandar Girl flees terrified).

Grandma’s reaction (and Joy’s) is woven over more than one episode. But contained within this episode are two very different reactions for us to think over. Both Daisy and Mason reveal themselves as Grim Reapers to the living and are feeling letdown with the results, but for different reasons. The Priest, who had lost his faith, embraces the knowledge of reapers and their activities among the living resurrecting his faith stronger than it had ever been. Whereas Bandar and friends – in particular Mason’s temporary girl friend, who seem in life to be pursuing a closer association with Death, when they actually find the real deal reject it and flee.

Daisy has met the Priest before in confessional. This final meeting represents a turning point for her. She was looking for something revealing from the Priest’s death – something special about the reception i.e. his lights that didn’t match her expectations. She also is clearly put off by his weaknesses in character (i.e. his drinking no doubt, but also his noticing her beauty - ‘Father. Tsk, tsk’), but she snaps when he offers to reveal to her the secrets of the universe and he says:

P: We are born.
We die.
We rot. (He laughs.)
It’s all one big cosmic joke.

For Daisy who very much would really like to know the ‘secrets of the universe’ his mocking of his own faith is a devastating rejection of her own experiments along those lines. Daisy needs to know something of those secrets to help fill the gaping void she feels. For her just knowing, as all reapers do, that there is a soul and that it does go somewhere is not enough to buoy her and keep her going during her long reaper purgatory. Keep in mind that by this time her existence as a reaper is likely more than 2.5X her total living experience. Up to this point she has pursued her religion and faith despite being mocked and abused by George, Rube, and Roxy, but the Priest’s mockery is too much. She takes up a very large knife and plunges it thru her own hand. She puts her rapidly healing hand in front of his face and that gets his attention for what she has to tell him. She then nicely summarizes her own (and for reapers in general) predicament:

D: I died in 1938……..
So now I stay here and I help other people go.
And they do go somewhere. I know that much.
I don’t know if there’s a Heaven or a Hell. But I believe…..there’s more.
My whole life - my whole death - shows me there’s more.
I just don’t know what it is.

The Priest gets the key point here quickly enough and his faith is restored. Daisy has shown him a miracle. When miracles become fact then faith is no longer something abstract, but turns into a very solid tangible foundation for a cultural revolution to rival Science. (Oddly altho he is convinced that Daisy is in fact a Grim Reaper, he never asks the obvious question and goes unsuspecting to his own quick end.) Anyway, clearly if this knowledge were to get out it would mean a rejuvenation of religion unprecedented in world history, but not for all people (as Mason will demonstrate). Daisy, however, after the reap and send off into the lights exits the church without her cross leaving it next to the Priest’s body along with her faith. From this episode she tries the Priest’s method of choice, the bottle, rather ironically to fill that void.

Visually this change is shown to us - when Daisy enters the church to find the Priest we see her arbitrarily walk from the left thru the pews toward the central aisle. After the reap when she is walking / talking to Rube and he pointedly asks her if she found what she is looking for she just looks at him before walking suddenly away from him (and her pursuit of faith) in the central aisle thru the pews to our right. The Priest gets his faith restored, but Daisy loses hers.

Mason reveals himself to the living also, but gets a very different response altho like Daisy he too is not happy with the result. He meets up with some sort of celebrity, Bandar, and his crowd who ostentatiously pursue association with Death. The Bandar Girl insists that Mason smells like Death, singling him out of a crowd for no apparent reason to Bandar who then signals the security guard to let Mason enter with them. Why would this girl notice anything about Mason at all? – perhaps she like Ronnie can sense things the living aren’t supposed to, perhaps a little interference from the PTB to ensure their reaper gets access to do his duty, and/or maybe the PTB are using Mason to send a message to Bandar and his entourage. This Bandar Girl is the second living in the series – after Ronnie – who both seem to have some ability to sense something of the other side, altho in each case they are not fully aware what it is they are sensing – in Ronnie’s case until it was too late. The Girl survives the encounter here, altho as we learned from the return of Rube’s envelope the PTB can be very patient (and unpredictable) in their response to transgressions (a small something left hanging for a season 3 resolution? As a potential demonstration as to what could happen to Reggie?)

Mason was a bit more coy than Daisy, but still very revealing, and the living he told reaper secrets to remain alive.

M: I was dead.
And now I’m not.
I’m a Grim Reaper.
I take people’s souls before they die.

M: Do you know when you’re p*ss drunk and you collapse on the floor, and someone comes to wake you up because the police are just about to arrive, yeah?
Well, I’m that someone.
And at first….they don’t know where they are, or who they are, and they’re a little bit confused.
Well, that’s why I’m there, cause I’m there to…I’m there to reassure them. I’m there to …make them believe everything’s all right.

It’s seems likely that the Bandar Girl got a glimpse of Mason’s postit with Jeannie’s name on it (watch her intertwine with Mason at minute 34 as he pulls the postit out from his shirt pocket directly in front of her face – both can read it), and when Mason is pressed by events to reap Jeannie after she’s shot in the Girl’s presence he calls out loudly asking what her name is and Kyle’s current girlfriend yells out that name very clearly – in the commotion both the Girl and Mason hear it. Mason reaps Jeannie and as he gets up from the deed he turns and notices the Girl who he tentatively moves toward. She, tho, reacts oddly given her earlier enthusiasm for his ‘smell of Death’. Now that she knows that he is in fact, truly, no f*cking kidding, working with/for Death and was telling the truth earlier that he is an undead Grim Reaper she very unambiguously rejects him and what he is fleeing in real terror. Mason, like Daisy, but for different reasons, is disappointed in the outcome of his revealing reaper secrets to the living and he picks up a bottle (as Daisy soon will too).

Probably one reason we have the gravelings in the DLM universe is to help separate the reapers from the actual act of killing itself in the audience’s mind. From the first episodes great care is shown to make sure the distinction is clear that the reapers don’t actually kill anyone – they are there to collect and escort souls, intended no doubt to take some of the grim off the Grim Reaper cognomen. However, by this episode the reapers are so humanized that the gravelings drop to the side in the primary arc. Jeannie, the ex-girl friend, kills Kyle, and then Roxy shoots her before she can finish off her rival. This is the only episode in which a reaper kills instead of a graveling. Roxy has reaped many souls and seen many deaths, but is pushed a bit off balance because this time she was the instrument of death vs the usual graveling.

Note that as George stalks her quarry, Kyle, she narrates a comment that probably would not have been allowed in the first season for the very reason that it pulls our attention to the reapers as potentially actively killing:

G: It’s one thing to show up, take the soul, get on with your afterlife.
You can think of yourself like some kind of…..accident.
But when you have to work at it, it feels more like…..murder.

Rube hovers over his flock, but otherwise remains on the side pretty much in this episode. Back at the Waffle Haus as the gang gathers after the big job, even tho Mason screws up his reap and clearly feels retribution is deserved, Rube just offers him a piece of pecan pie – food again being used as family bonding as Rube forgives Mason and asserts their common family connection.

As the three main themes of the series develop thru each episode there were no doubt changes in details made and certainly we can see evidence that the storytelling style had to change as the various people in control of the creative process evolved their particular visions of how reapers fit into the DLM universe. This episode is notable in that it marks the most extreme humanization of the reapers thus far and this of course has to affect how the themes/stories are developed/told.

Before Fuller’s DLM pilot there were many examples of Death taking human form to perform their soul collecting duties – e.g. the Grim Reaper in the ‘Seventh Seal’ is well known.

Another example is the 1934 movie ‘Death Takes a Holiday’ based on an earlier play in which Death is an entity not of this world of the living but something occupying the nexus between the living and the dead. This entity gets curious enough to take over the body of a man so that he can walk among the living for a holiday. He finds true love and takes her back with him. His behavior and reactions to the living and their habits are a precursor to the modern day alien contact stories (e.g. ‘Starman’ and a few dozen others).

DTH was remade in 1998 as ‘Meet Joe Black’ which also has Death take on human form and walk among the living, but in this case he decides to stay over with his true love for the duration (what’s a lifetime to an eternal entity?). Both stories have Death taking on human form, but in both Death is of non human origin. Their reactions are entertaining, but we can’t easily identify with these non-human entities.

Another example is the SF novel ‘The Pale Rider’ that puts a human from this side of that divide in the role of the collector of souls. The hero is a human who screws up his own suicide and by a freak accident ends up killing Death thereby getting drafted into taking his place. He is exposed to that other side but not of it. He is a human being tasked with the collecting of souls and so long as he is performing his duties and until he is done in by another freak accident he is immortal. ‘The Pale Rider’ Grim Reaper was a human drafted into the job, but he seemed to be on that other side after assuming his duties and was exercising significant supernatural (acquired for the job) powers to carry out his duties.

Fuller’s genius was to create a very humanized Grim Reaper – actually a whole lot of them making up a community of undead people whose souls are held over to perform escort duties for other souls – that know nothing of that other side and retain a very much human perspective – except unlike the living they know for a fact there’s something on the other side of those lights they see everyday as Daisy points out in this episode in talking to the Priest. For each reaper what comes after death is not some abstract philosophical or theological issue it’s a very concrete question impacting their own perspectives on their own deaths and any potential post life existence as they go about the duties for which they were drafted – the reaper army is not a volunteer force – to perform for several decades. Pre reaper Daisy in her short life probably never gave a moment’s contemplation to what might come in 10 years let alone what would happen to her soul after death. The same could be said for Mason when he wasn’t on drugs. George in her youth was obsessed with other considerations. But in their reaper state they can’t avoid the issue even as they can’t answer it.

Fuller also borrowed heavily from ‘The Lovely Bones’ to fill out much of the two main themes we see explored in his episodes and much of the first season. But from his new vantage point he created his own unique modern mythology.

In ‘Pushing Daisies’ his main character can raise the dead. He finds and brings back his true love, but if he touches her again she will die and forever be out of even his reach.

In DLM Fuller takes a young girl (essentially the one from TLB) and makes her a grim reaper collecting souls, held here among the living and denied knowledge of that other side (in TLB the young girl is allowed access to the lowest levels of Heaven and kept in the dark about what awaits her in some uncertain future when she is allowed access to higher levels. Note the parallel with reapers who don’t know when they will be given the nod to themselves finally pass over. How and when the TLB Susan can rise to those higher levels is as ambiguous as it is for George and all the reapers – when they fill their quotas.). He puts his DLM girl within walking distance of her living family. She can even sit down and talk to her family, but if she tries to communicate/share her identity with them directly she will lose that which binds them as a family – their common memories. And those memories – as Fuller points out – are all a reaper gets to keep from their life, and what gives them a sense of self. Lose memories and you lose self awareness/sense of identity.

This issue with memories and reaper identity – and this can’t be emphasized enough – is absolutely core to Fuller DLM universe mythology and underpins the agreement with the audience getting them to buy into the DLM universe and these characters. Fuller devoted the third episode 103 ‘Curious George’ to setting in place this framework when he had his newly dead George attempt to go back and talk directly to Joy. After being chased away from the house by Joy, George ends up at the Waffle Haus booth one on one with Rube at minute 40 where this sacrosanct piece of the DLM universe framework is laid down for the audience.

Rube: I know the menu like a first phone number… still have to read it to know what I want. George: Can I get a number 6
R: Want this?
G: I went home again.
R: Pass me a napkin.

R: You OK?

(George nods)

R: You lose anything?

….Memories?

G: I don’t know…..I tried to tell my Mom a story and ….. and now I can’t even remember what it was.

George Voiceover: It’s cruel and simple. The more I held onto my life the less there was to hold onto.

G: So my whole life …. everything… all I get to keep are thoughts and memories?
R: It’s all we ever had, Peanut.

I’ll see you in the morning?
G: Ya

George Voiceover: At the end of the day all you have are your experiences. I spent so much of my life avoiding experiences I didn’t have much to lose.


Even with the core of his mythology in place, Fuller in his DLM pilot seemed to be still working on the boundaries of how his reapers would operate and therefore what kind of stories would be told. His reapers in the pilot looked to be poised to exist only on the fringe walking freely among the living to get to their reaps sight unseen and unnoted, and as we saw Roxy move thru the physical to pull a reap’s soul out from under a piano, there was the potential to move thru physical obstructions to get to reaps – perhaps an influence from ‘The Pale Rider’. Those abilities would have had a huge impact on the plot lines. This episode’s title arc concerning the trouble getting to the celebrity would look very different and perhaps would never have been made by Fuller.

But even Fuller in his few episodes had already moved away from what was only hinted at in the pilot and towards a more humanized and therefore constrained reaper vision. After Fuller left we can see this shift pushed farther along so that the reapers face real obstacles in getting to their reaps. This humanization of the reapers and the more obstacles/hurdles they therefore face getting to their reaps allows for more opportunities for – let’s call it - shiny object entertainment in which our attention is drawn to their struggles in overcoming the various hurdles, and the illusion of potential failure is ever present (tho Death always must win in the end). The less human i.e. the more supernatural they are then the focus has to shift to less physical struggle and more contemplative complications with - and take your choice – each other, internal personal struggles, their reaps – over more abstract issues. The latter option was probably deemed a harder road to higher ratings than the former. The mix we got in S2 has more of the former up front with a still substantial portion of the latter working below the surface but more suppressed than anything directly working off the pilot.

So still even with the struggles and the humanization of the reapers what is also notable about DLM is its lack of frenetic activity to catch and hold the attention of viewers – no fight scenes, no chase scene, no slapstick, no escalating evil monsters/threats, no nudity – and despite that lack it still holds up pretty well. Mason and the guy in the little hot sports car got a peek at some of Daisy’s attributes denied to the rest of us and then there’s George’s liaison with Trip (next episode that arc begins) – both were marked by more visual discretion than Showtime’s usual baseline.


Dead Like Me Resurrection pending

#47 Danioton

Danioton

    Viper Pilot

  • Full Members
  • Pip
  • 103 posts

Posted 07 September 2012 - 10:24 PM

Ep 207 Rites of Passage (continued)


(1) (Opens with George narrating. We see a nighttime scenic across the water parking spot with numerous cars, and George sitting in a car with a newly dead soul she’s just reaped - a little small talk to help him adjust to his recent death before he crosses over. He asks, as many souls seem to, what’s next? and she explains that she - and reapers in general - don’t really know.)

George Voice Over: I know there are billions of stars in the sky. And there’re all twinkling. I wonder what makes one star more important than another. I mean, why does one star become part of the Big Dipper and another just …. flame out?

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(2) (At the Lass house Joy is in bed. She wakes up due to sounds and movement from outside the house - on the roof in particular.)

GVO: Some people believe there’s something bigger out there…..that there’s something protecting us…watching over us as we change.

I guess it’s comforting to think that someone is looking in on us.


(It turns out Joy’s mother is on the rooftop with a guy, Hank, who’s working up an estimate to fix the roof (the problem that caused the escrow to fail). Grandma turns out to be 180 degree opposite from Joy as the sparks start to fly. Joy likes things to line up and stay in line and Grandma likes things out of order and spontaneous. Grandma admires Hank’s rear in front of Reggie – something Joy does not approve of. Or as Grandma says Joy never liked to get her hands dirty whereas Grandma’s hands love the dirt. Grandma lights some incense to let us know where her character is going.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(4) (Joy has taken refuge in her room. Reggie has come back down the stairs to find Grandma with the burning incense and waving her hands and the smoke about in some ritual in front of a framed photo of George and Reggie fishing together on the dock at the vacation cabin at the lake.)

GVO: Some repairs you can get an estimate for………and some repairs…….you can’t put a price on. People always say ‘you can’t take it with you’. But try dying and then coming back, see if you don’t try to hold onto something.

Something important.


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(5) (At the Waffle Haus, the four minion reapers are discussing a passage from the Bible regarding Moses / sitting / in a confrontation with Death - instigated by Daisy still in her religious phase. Rube shows up and overhears some of Daisy’s talk of God kissing Moses when he died. Rube immediately is hostile and asks whether she’s gotten to the part where God hates Death and promises to banish ‘us’ from Heaven - he seems to be taking it personally. He holds Daisy’s Bible and his postit date book in his other hand and balances them weighing one against the other finishing by tossing her Bible in front of her and saying ‘There’s no place for you in here, Sweetness.’ He then hands George an envelope – a Very Important Person Reap (VIPR) envelope - and she hasn’t a clue what it is. The other three know immediately and get upset that she got the VIPR given her newness and relative youth (reaper years). Once again the dialogue affirms that reaps and reapers are assigned to each other at a level above Rube and the connection can’t be changed by either Rube or the reapers.

The envelope contains $500 and a posit for K. Lowerdeck – Kyle Lowerdeck - a famous pop singer in the DLM universe. Daisy gets a postit as does Mason. His is at the same location as the VIPR – Roxy calls his ‘sloppy seconds’.

Daisy opens the paper to an advertisement for the show that night in town by Kyle and mentions a VIPR she had - James Dean. Rube’s final reaction to her sums up how he views her.)

G: He’s cute (looking at a picture of Kyle in the advertisement).
D: He’s not as cute as my first VIPR – James Dean.
Beautiful Porsche. These really delicate lips. But he was so confused.
M: Did he try to nail you?
D: No, I don’t know why.
Rube: I do

(The scene closes with an odd one on one dialogue between Rube and Roxy in which he asks/negotiates with her to use her position as a police officer to help George with her reap – something she resists and then walks out on Rube. This episode probably pushes the idea farthest along the continuum that the reapers are very much like people and must overcome challenges and hurdles to accomplish their very supernatural task of reaping souls as opposed to the rough initial reaper concept sketched out by Fuller in the pilot in which reapers were implied to have the ability to choose whether the living could see or hear them or not, and, Roxy demonstrated that a reaper can move thru the physical (when she reaped the piano woman). The application of these supernatural abilities would have made accessing their reaps much easier, and in this case would have radically changed the arc / stories here for George and Mason.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(9) (At the Lass house Joy and Grandma are already clashing as they argue over controversies from when Joy was a child most of which turn on Grandma being a genuine hippie type and Joy somehow growing into a more detail oriented methodological type. Reggie is stuck in the middle of these two forces.

Joy comes upon Grandma in the living room conducting some sort of prayer ritual – again – having something to do with George’s death the year before. Grandma again would seem very open to the ‘other side’ of the life/death divide. Then Grandma starts spouting certain ‘sayings’ that Joy has heard before – many times apparently.)

J: Oh, God!
You know, Mom, you can’t take care of Reggie and channel Hiawatha at the same time.
Reggie isn’t ready for your version of the healing process.
Grandma: Reggie is old enough to make her own decisions.
J: No, Mother, she’s not, all right? She’s 11.
G: ‘The path of care is the one we carve for ourselves’.
J: You’ve been saying that for as long as I’ve worn a bra, and I still have no clue what is means. Just …please leave Reggie out of your hocus pocus.
G: ‘Rules are the first step towards tyranny of the soul’.
J: You’re right. The rules are just getting in the way! That’s good.
(Reggie enters)
Reggie!
You know all that stuff about going to school, and brushing your teeth, not talking to strangers?
Just forget about all that, OK? You can just do whatever you want. Do you need some money for drugs?
R: Why are you such a freak?
J: (leaving) Ask your Grandmother.
R: Where is she going?
G: I don’t know. Your Mother was never very good about sharing.
R: You have to take me to school.
G: Ooooh you’re not going to school today?
R: What am I doing?
G: Can you keep a secret?

(Grandma will be taking Reggie along to find closure on George’s passing and in the process Reggie will believe she’s found someone who can appreciate some of her secret knowledge about George’s not passing, but Grandma won’t – surprisingly – be able to appreciate what Reggie has to share.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(10) (At Happy Time George starts her research on her reap and ends up taking down several computers. Misty shows up as a fan of Kyle. Delores misunderstands when Misty shows George a few of her tatoos thinking that George and Misty have a relationship of another sort.)

GVO: I had a secret. I had a date with a rock star……..and nobody knew.

(George feels the need to tell Delores that she’s not a lesbian. Delores’ frustrations in hooking up come to the surface and she explains her buffet view of the world and sex.)

G: I’m not a lesbian.
D: Oh, Millie, we’ve all experimented.
G: No…I haven’t
D: It’s not as if I didn’t go to college. We’ve all put our big toe in that water.
G: I really haven’t.
(Delores is getting rejections on her computer from her dating service as this dialogue happens.)
G: Delores?
D: You know when you’re young like you are, Millie, …it’s easy. Man, woman, bottom, top…sex is this big buffet and you’re just a fat man with a fork. But as you get older it’s harder to get a fork.
G: Ok, thanks, um…I have to leave early today.
D: Another doctor’s appointment?
G: No.
D: An AA meeting?
G: No.
D: What then?
G: A rock concert.
D: (She takes George’s hand) Enjoy the buffet, Millie.
G: Ya, ok, thanks, bye.

(George’s calls to get tickets to the concert end in a dead end. Mason shows up to collect her. Roxy is downstairs to provide a police escort to the concert.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(14) (Grandma is going thru newspaper clippings of George’s death and discussing her death and her spirit being around with Reggie. Right from this beginning Grandma, who likes to see herself as having a very loose affiliation with the establishment, talks about mystical this and spiritual that and in particular about George’s spirit being around. Reggie starts to open up about her own suspicions regarding George and Grandma says she too thinks George’s spirit is ‘around’. As this arc develops in this episode and later it comes out that Grandma is the real delusional one and will soon be proven to have no faith at all in her mystical talk. As Reggie reveals more of her thinking on George, Grandma recoils in proportion to her understanding that Reggie is very serious about her belief in holding onto a connection with George. At this stage of Reggie’s understanding her ideas about George are still vague. By comparison, in this episode, Daisy’s Priest and Mason’s new Goth friends get much more concrete detail about reapers. Notice what each does with what knowledge they get. )

Grandma: Death is the biggest mystery in life.


G: We have to find the things and the places that keep George alive. They’re everywhere. Her…her spirit…it’s…it’s all around us.
R: Sometimes I hear things.
G: Me too….me too.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(14) (Roxy and Mason are with George at her house looking thru her wardrobe for appropriate attire to allow her to blend in enough to get close to her target celebrity reap. Too many of George’s clothes have blood and/or brains so she decides to take George shopping with what’s left of the $500 from ‘upper management’ and leave Mason behind. George has to move her gold frog - Death – off some clothes.

This whole conversation eventually comes down to Roxy’s management of the situation - choosing clothes to get George close to her target reap – because she’s a girl and looking good is her ticket to access – George is young and cute. George’s fringe double appearance is gone. And she has to use purely mundane human attributes to get where she needs to go to do her supernatural reaper job.

Mason claims to have reaped Charlton Heston (Isn’t he really dead???) and in response to George’s speculation that Rube has had many big reaps Mason makes his comment (to be repeated) that Rube is so old he reaped Jesus. Mason also reveals he was born ‘behind the amps backstage’ of a rock ‘n’ roll establishment.

The scene ends with Roxy and George departing leaving Mason behind ‘on his own’ and with a very real possibility of failing to get to his reap.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(16) (Daisy appears at the same church in which the ‘Reaper Madness’ wedding ended in three reaps – the bride and groom and George’s first post death fling – where she will meet the Priest again – the one who gave her the confessional in an earlier episode.

Notice she is shown walking thru the pews to our left towards the confessionals on her way to the Priest’s office. She still sees religious faith as the pathway towards her on Earth enlightenment. When she finishes the reap and after a brief talk with Rube she will abruptly walk away from him thru the pews to our right. After losing her faith – something about the Priest’s exit disappointed her – and after leaving her cross behind - she will be taking a new direction or at least looking for a new direction for enlightenment. Perhaps she notices that the Father is drinking heavily in his own bid for a form of enlightenment. After Daisy surrenders her cross –and faith – she takes up this pathway as her own in later episodes.

At this time in the scene the Priest is her target reap and not her confessor. She enters his office and finds him drinking and drunk. He recognizes her voice from her confession a few weeks prior remembering her as the woman who stole a cross from a dead woman. She finds that he has lost his faith and is disappointed when sneaking a peek at the cross on her neck he doesn’t hide his noticing her beauty. He then reveals he is as empty as she is when he tells her what he sees as the secret of the universe. This mockery of his faith – and by implication her own faith - is too much for her and in one of the more dramatic scenes of the series she picks up a very large and sharp knife and plunges it thru her hand including thru a few hand bones - very painful – the healing part comes after the pain part. The hand of course heals immediately, which gets the priest’s attention. While the priest is still very much on this side Daisy begins revealing lots of reaper secrets.)

D: (entering his dark office) Father Mathias?
Priest: Confession is closed.
D: Umm. I know….I just. Well, it’s occupied anyway…. a boy and girl are actually desecrating the confessional.
P: They are fruitful and multiplying.
D: Are you drunk Father?
P: I’m sorry I’m not being a very good priest.
D: No, you certainly aren’t.
P: I know you.
Were you here for confession a couple of weeks ago?
D: I was.
P: Were you the one who stole a cross from a dead woman?
D: Well if you want to put it that way, fine.
P: (gets up to pick up Daisy’s neck scarf to see the cross) It’s very beautiful.
D: Thank you.
P: So are you.
D: Father. Tsk, tsk.
P: Well, I’ve done the drinking, and the coveting that’s a given, but that’s where I stop.

What’s your name?
D: Daisy Adair.
P: My parish is poor. I’ve spent a lifetime trying to bring hope to the hopeless, convincing them that there’s some great reward ahead. I worry about the hearts of men, Daisy.
D: So do I.
P: Would you like to know the secrets of the universe, Daisy?
D: (Daisy nods affirmatively and at his urging she leans forward to hear placing her hands on the desk.)
P: We are born.
We die.
We rot. (He laughs at his own joke.)

It’s all one big cosmic joke.

(And some important deep mental support inside Daisy’s head snaps at the Priest’s mockery of his own faith and therefore hers, and she picks up a large knife on the desk and plunges it thru the back of her hand, which of course as painful as it might have been, heals immediately.)

P: Oh, my Lord.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(19) (Mason deserted by Roxy and George finds himself outside the concert hall and far from his reap with no means to get in. The guards are immune to his manipulations. When Roxy shows up escorting George into the hall she pretends not to know Mason. George gets into the hall.)

GVO: You know that dream where you’re sitting in class and all of the sudden you realize you’re naked? Well I never had that dream….

(George slips and falls making her entrance into the almost inner sanctum of the concert hall.)

Until now.

(Her target reap’s ex-girlfriend, Jeannie, shows up to befriend her and escort George and us around the set.

When Jeannie asks George why she’s there….)

GVO: OK….You’re suppose to be here but have no responsibilities.

(George improvises saying she’s a network intern. Jeannie knew Kyle – was his girlfriend - when he was making music in his garage just two years prior – and has had to make way for Kyle’s current very possessive girlfriend, who becomes George’s biggest obstacle to touching him in that special way. Jeannie and George start bonding over drinks.)

GVO: Amen to that sister.

Just like that I was a rocker chick.


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(22) (Outside the Hall Mason is still struggling overcome his obstacles when some sort of someone named Bandar shows up with his entourage all of whom are reeking of death images/Goth. One of Bandar’s girls notices Mason saying he smells like Death and gets Bandar to take him along granting Mason his access. Why would this girl notice anything about Mason at all? – perhaps a little interference from the PTB to ensure their reaper gets his access to do his duty, and/or they are using Mason to send a message to Bandar and his entourage. This Bandar Girl is the second living in the series – the first was Ronnie Dobbs in episode 107 ‘Reaper Madness’ – who seems to have some ability to sense something of the other side, altho in both cases they are not fully aware what it is they are sensing – in Ronnie’s case until it was too late.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(23) (Inside Mason is getting to know his new friends - Bandar and his girls. Like George Mason starts to drink.

And then the camera shifts to following George and Jeannie, the ex girlfriend, as George maneuvers to get close enough to reap her target.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(24) (Altho the Priest is not yet dead, Daisy is telling him what she is and does since her own death and he is amazed – not surprisingly. Her few words pretty nicely sum up the state reapers find themselves in as they know there’s more but are denied any knowledge as to what it might be. So close and so far - Fuller’s fingerprints are all over this basic DLM universe formulation. The reapers have a huge advantage over the living, who, like the Priest, stand much farther away from that other side. The Priest here is our stand-in for all the living – excuse me – some of the living, because we see later in this episode that when some of those other living get a peek at that other side they’re not so eager for more contact – a very different reaction.)

Daisy: I died in 1938, which interrupted a very promising career on the silver screen.
So now I stay here and I help other people go.
And they do go somewhere. I know that much.

(The Priest takes her hand – the one she stabbed.)

D: I don’t know if there’s a Heaven or a Hell. But I believe…..there’s more.

My whole life - my whole death - shows me there’s more.
I just don’t know what it is.

P: Thank you. (The Priest rises and chastely – his faith has been renewed and temptations of the flesh are now far from his mind ….or hormones - kisses Daisy on the forehead.)
D: (smiling as she looks up knowingly at him) You can’t tell anyone.
P: Ah..I have to …..I have to tell them.
D: Ya…I know you do. (She touches his head and shoulders reaping him. She has very deliberately timed her revelations.)
P: (As he’s leaving – to tell everyone – he turns back to Daisy.)
Thank you for giving me back my faith.

(The Priest never stops to ask himself why a Grim Reaper is visiting / talking to him. Daisy as we hear is quite clear about what it is she does - collecting the souls of people just before they die. Tsk, tsk Father. This short arc between Daisy and the Priest had so much wasted potential – her relationship with the Priest and the final close for the reap could have easily been expanded thru a couple more of episodes of time.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(26) (Mason meets Bandar and like Daisy is revealing reaper secrets. Again as with the artist in S1 Mason is being used to contrast with Daisy and also Reggie in this case. Notice Daisy was careful and deliberate and there was no real danger that her reap would get a chance to tell anyone anything. Mason is reckless – because he’s drinking? - as he admits to being a reaper with his new Bandar crowd who like to think of themselves as close to Death. Perhaps the PTB are using Mason to scare / warn off these living from their flirting with the other side given the reaction that comes later.)

Bandar: So…..Is it true?
M: I don’t know what the h*ll she’s talking about, Bank-Aid, but I do want a bit more Tequila, know what I mean?
B: It’s Bandar – M*therf*cker.
The Bandar Girl: Look into his eyes. He’s dead.
M: Ahh.
BG: You’re dead, right?
M: Aww man I’m deathly attracted to you. I’m dead on arrival at your doorstep. I’m dead serious.
B: Don’t you get it? You’re with friends now. Just answer the question.
Are you dead?
M: I was dead.
And now I’m not.
I’m a Grim Reaper.
I take people’s souls before they die.
BG: I knew it.
B: What is it like to take someone’s soul?
M: All right, Bandar. Do you know when you’re p*ss drunk and you collapse on the floor, and someone comes to wake you up because the police are just about to arrive, yeah?
Well, I’m that someone.
And at first….they don’t know where they are, or who they are, and they’re a little bit confused.
Well, that’s why I’m there, cause I’m there to…I’m there to reassure them. I’m there to …make them believe everything’s all right.
B: (raises a bottle to toast) To Death!
M: Ahh..Nice. (gets his glass filled) To Death! Tonight!

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(27) (We see the Priest in his church in ecstasy as he revels in his newfound revelations from Daisy. Unfortunately, his exuberance – his over exuberance scares the only living he meets into running away and leads to his death.

The newly dead soul of the Priest appears near his body as Daisy walks up. He’s a bit confused, but his earlier talk with Daisy has him ready for ….something big.)

Priest: So….is that all there is?
D: No. This is only the start.
Look. (She looks behind as his lights take shape. He notices too and moves toward them and hesitates before going thru.)

D: Father?
P: Yes?
D: Is it all they say it is?
P: I’m as curious as you are, Daisy.

(Daisy was looking forward to getting some insight from the priest just before he enters his lights, but we can see the disappointment on her face as he enters his - what are to her - average lights. She was looking for something more revelatory.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(29) (We shift to Mason and then George at the pre-show party for her VIP Reap and in her narrative we hear her allude to what seems at first to be Daisy’s preoccupation with what’s on the other side, but George jumps over to a reference to down to Earth concerns – getting into the inner sanctum where Kyle is. She gets into that sanctum close to her reap, Kyle, but then Kyle’s girlfriend blocks George from touching him.)

GVO: I know there’s a much better place out there.
If I could only figure out how to access it.
The better place out there in my mind? It’s the VIP Room. And tonight…..I’m finally gettin’ in.

(George gets close and introduced to Kyle, but his girlfriend forbids a handshake.)

GVO: It’s one thing to show up, take the soul, get on with your afterlife.
You can think of yourself like some kind of…..accident.
But when you have to work at it, it feels more like…..murder.


(With the reapers becoming so humanized the need for gravelings diminishes and the above voice over quote from George becomes OK, but it’s something unlikely to have appeared in the first season, particularly in Fuller’s episodes.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(31) (Daisy is alone in the church with her thoughts. This reap marks the finish for her experiment with religion - the end signaled by her leaving her cherished cross – the one she lifted from the old Irish woman she reaped – next to the dead Priest.

Rube shows up to offer Daisy a ride home and talks to Daisy. Daisy says she had expected the Priest’s lights to be far more glamorous with trumpets and angels. He notices the cross is missing from around her neck. Rube shares some of his own thoughts on ‘our endings’.

As they walk off down the aisle toward the exit together Rube asks whether she found what she was looking for. Daisy’s only response is to abruptly walk away down one of the pews – to our right - without words perhaps signaling her opinion of Rube’s asking her whether she ‘found what she was looking for?’ and/or a sort of visual book end to the earlier scene when she walked to the left and here meaning she’s open to some new pathway looking for some light in the here and now.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(32) (Joy is sitting by herself on a bench near flowers at the place downtown near Happy Time where the toilet seat took George’s life. Grandma and Reggie show up surprising Joy who thought Reggie was in school. It develops that Reggie had never been brought to see this place.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(34) (Mason is bonding with his new Bandar friends. Bandar is asking Mason how he could become a reaper. Mason explains the all-important detail that he has to die first.

Another small but important detail in this scene - notice that Mason with his Bandar Girl wrapped inside his arm reaches into his shirt pocket to look at his postit. The Girl, given her face is about 7 or 8 inches from the postit he’s reading, may well have seen the name written on it.)

Bandar: How do I become a reaper?
M: How do you…..Bandar, first of all you have to experience the inconvenience of dying.
(Laughter all around – at Death?)
B: I can do that.
M: Don’t you think this is a bit bl**dy morbid tho. It’s like I can promise ya. Death will find you. You do not have to invite it in.
B: You’re never more alive until you’re the closest to Death.
Mason’s Bandar Girl: Very…..very right.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(34) (Kyle is warming up in the VIP Room and George is intently studying her target reap. When everyone is asked to leave George manages to hang back enough to get in alone with Kyle for a pre-reap talk.)

GVO: It’s always the same, whether it’s asking someone out, jumping in the water, losing your virginity, they always say the same thing….Just do it. My very important problem was, I had never done any of those very important things.

(The room gets cleared and a guard pushes George out, but she hangs back and gets in alone with Kyle, and, after some small talk, reaps him)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(36) (Mason suddenly realizes that the ETD for his reap his upon him and he hasn’t yet even identified his reap. Again tho she doesn’t have time to look at it the Girl grabs Mason’s postit implying she’s well aware of his interest in it and reinforcing the possibility she’s seen it given how close she and Mason have been in the minutes leading up to the now.

As he’s about to get out, Bandar decides Mason is there to reap him, and Mason tries to repair some of the damage telling his ‘friends’ that he’s not really a grim reaper.

Kyle enters to take his place on stage and sing ‘Now in my time of dying…..’

George is off to the side observing the stage. We see Roxy up in front of the stage as a guard.

Kyle’s ex-girl friend, Jeannie, steps up front with a gun and shoots him. No graveling actively involved – hovering up above only.

As Kyle’s current girl comes to Kyle’s aid Jeannie draws on her too, but Roxy shoots Jeannie first. No graveling here. This time Roxy – a reaper – is the instrument of killing. These reapers are so human the audience doesn’t need the graveling crutch in this story.

Quickly, Mason jumps in, shouts asking the ex’s name, and reaps her ….a bit late. His Bandar Girl – who may at this moment be realizing that Mason had the name of the dying woman on his postit when he arrived – incriminating evidence - is right there in front of him and realizes in horror that Mason really truly no-joke for real is working with/for Death and as Mason tentatively tries to approach her, she flees – a very unambiguous rejection of him and what he is in a very different reaction from that of the Priest when presented with a peek at that other side. She may have seen the name on the posit when earlier she and Bandar touched it, and connected the name when Mason called out asking for this girl’s name just before he reaped her.

Mason picks up a bottle and resumes drinking.

George is shown outside walking/talking with Kyle’s newly dead soul where he sees the early reaction by crowds of people to his death – lots of candles i.e. ‘lights’ of a sort.)

Kyle: What’s this?
G: It’s for you.
K: Wow! Does everyone get this?
G: No.
K: Did you get this?
G: No, no lights for me. Not yet.

GVO: Everyday I watch people die. Why one death means more than another, I have no idea.

(We see Daisy observing the goings on from nearby. She’s been knocked off her happy-with-faith track to enlightenment.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(40) (Grandma is lighting candles in some ceremony for Reggie related to George’s death. Reggie is studying Grandma’s behavior carefully. It’s not how she’s been approaching the George issue, but she’s keeping an open mind.)

GVO: I think people need something familiar.

(Joy enters the scene.)

GVO: Something they can remember.

(There’s a rift between the living mother and dead daughter and there’s one almost as big between a living mother and a living daughter.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(42) (We see Rube and Roxy at a Waffle Haus booth discussing the VIP Reap. They can see the crowd’s reaction – candles and gathering – to Kyle’s death.

Roxy is unsettled a bit by her being the instrument of death (vs the usual graveling) – she had to shoot the ex-girl friend. Rube consoles her pointing out it’s her job – her living cover job as a police officer.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(43) (We see Daisy and Mason just outside the Waffle Haus where Daisy spontaneously kisses Mason when he says he can’t face Rube for screwing up his reap.)

D: Don’t make more of it than it is.

(Then Daisy leads him into the Waffle Haus.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(43) (Outside the concert hall where George was talking to Kyle, George is now standing alone in the crowd – Kyle having already moved on.)

GVO: Maybe it’s easier to mourn someone you never really knew.
I’m not sure I get it. All this shared pain.


(We see Grandma doing her ritual/ceremony.)
I guess it’s a place to leave a sign.
A way of saying that you lost someone too.


Everyone was connecting.
Everyone of course, except me.


(Back to the Waffle Haus, Mason confesses his incompetence to Rube who, in response, gives him a piece of pecan pie – food again being used to assert a family bond. Mason compliments Roxy’s shooting.

They all greet George and congratulate her at a successful VIP Reap. And with a little small talk the reaper family is bonding after a successful big job.)

(Shifting to sometime later….)
GVO: Not every death gets a candlelight vigil.
(We see Reggie looking outside her window for a sign George is around somewhere.)

(We see George back in her car at the overlook from the opening scene of the episode and she is again looking up contemplating the stars.)
Most deaths, they just got a sky full of stars.
That’s not bad …. for a nobody like me.

(And downtown we see the candles and a note left earlier that day by Grandma and Reggie at the site of George’s death.)
Dead Like Me Resurrection pending

#48 Danioton

Danioton

    Viper Pilot

  • Full Members
  • Pip
  • 103 posts

Posted 26 January 2013 - 10:01 PM

Ep 208 The Escape Artist


“If I only knew then what I know now.” – Georgia Lass

George: He’s my first boyfriend.
Daisy: Well…..It’s a little risky, Georgia.
George: What have I got to lose?
Daisy: …….Everything.


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The restructuring of Fuller’s original vision for the ‘Dead Like Me’ characters and their universe is well along here, but still in process. Overall in S2 there’s very clear direction to the major themes and story developments – a direction more clear than in the post Fuller S1 episodes - and also there are plenty of carefully placed elements thru-out S2 pointing to the major plot directions likely to have occupied S3 (and beyond?). The still in process part would be taking us to character development and story arc ends much farther along than what we saw by the end of S2.

In this particular episode we can see the taking apart and rearranging of that original vision. The fringe aspect of Fuller’s reaper world that was so central in the pilot is pretty much gone. These reapers and the universe they inhabit have undergone major changes. In particular, even tho in this evolving universe the reapers will not be constrained to a dark existence apart from the living world, that participation has boundaries, and some of the more ominous implications of that power that enforces those boundaries will need to be brought back for the later S3. In this episode we get just a declaration of this change in direction in Daisy’s single word – ‘Everything’.

We get some further adjustments to all of our reaper characters except Roxy.

In George’s case she’s ready to aspire to the country club set. The opening Georgia voice over starts off with talk about clubs, but this is to carry the headline arc introducing George’s pining for a first boy friend – a member of a country club - rich, witty, and handsome.

Mason is again hung with the dumb label while George is getting pushed up front as being loaded with smarts. Mason loses it after receiving a postit (with Roxy) for a couple of deaths on a plane with a Cancun (he’s never flown and can’t swim) destination. George immediately deduces that with only two deaths the plane won’t crash.

Even tho Rube does not have a huge load to carry in this episode (he’s a substitute teacher reaping a janitor at an elementary school) what we learn about him is an important part of the set up for the unlayering of his background story later. There are four of these elements in this episode - three in this opening booth scene alone are mentioned and a fourth is stuck in towards the very end.

The first is when he insists on moving the gang away from the crying baby. This is yet another example of his very bad reaction to crying babies (remember in the airport he had to write out an apology after he was overheard contemplating killing a crying baby). This is so persistent that it was likely to become important later revealing some role in decisions taken in his background (that probably ended badly). And in this episode given his dislike for kids the PTB give him a reap at a school where we learn kids like him. Note he again asserts he does not decide who gets what reap and surely if it were up to him he would not go to a school.

And then there is his odd reaction to religion. Now that Daisy has abandoned her Catholicism, Rube and her are best buddies right from the opening booth scene. Rube and she go off on a reap together! And pose as father/daughter! Rube consistently likes to talk about far away tribes and their religious practices involving death. However, whenever religious matters come up closer to home - i.e. Judeo-Christian – and this got personified by Daisy’s fling with religion, he reacted badly and with a short temper. Really odd because he often uses these distant tribes and their religious customs as examples to try and explain to George some obscure point somehow connected to her behaving, which she generally doesn’t get and clearly does not appreciate. Rube generally has not so far cared for Daisy, so this best buddies pairing stands out. Probably it’s telling us something about Rube’s relationship with religion and not so much about the relationship between these two, but this switch in tone between the two is dramatic and odd and so it naturally leads to the suspicion it’s somehow connected to his problem with certain close to home religion.

The third point shown to us about Rube is that after decades of WH breakfasts he tells his gang he’s already had breakfast at another diner. Seems innocent enough, but given Rube is a reaper who thrives on his compartmentalized routines, it’s probably another indication that the PTB’s manipulations (#1 George and #2 the return of the envelope) are having an effect on Rube.

The fourth point -towards the very end of this episode - we see a very brief scene with Rube busy making phone calls at a table in his apartment stacked with several large open telephone books. We can guess he’s tracking down his wife and daughter – something very much against the reaper code. Rube is cracking. It’s predictable and entirely due to the PTB.

Also here we get exposed again to just how different Joy and her own mother are, and yet towards the end they find agreement in their common worry over Reggie. Reggie reveals to Grandma that she met a boy at school (OK) that she thinks knows George (not OK).

That boy of course is Charlie the pet reaper that we saw at the end of S1 with Delores’ cat Murray and his close call at the vet’s. Notice that like the prior episode there’s no room for Happy Time and Delores here.

Charlie and Reggie are important – more so than Trip and the preparations for the fling with George. Trip is the natural playing out of the taking something back theme and was set up in the first episode in S2 with the talk about George’s virginity – very entertaining for a few episodes, but this arc ends when George gets over Trip’s leaving. Charlie and Reggie tho are setting up the main arcs that were to come in S3.

The elementary school Komodo dragon and janitor reaps by Charlie and Rube brought three reapers into the same room with Reggie – Charlie, Rube, and Daisy. This common meeting would have been used later. For example, in ep 213 ‘Last Call’ at minute 7 there’s a close call when Reggie, Clancy, Rube, Daisy, and George are all in the WH at the same time, but only Rube makes the connections. This close call was likely an exercise of sorts preparing the audience for just this sort of later development. Rube’s actions here are telling us how important it is that they all stay apart.

And of course in this episode Reggie picks up several tidbits of unexplained evidence that no doubt would have been used later. She notices Charlie’s slip when he said he’s been dead for seven years. Charlie has no idea about the Lord of the Rings (the Frodo and hobbit reference) and yet he knows George. While it’s possible a kid who is not attending school could still be reading newspapers and could therefore know about George’s toilet seat death, how could he then have missed the reference to the LOTR movies? And finally it’s pointedly shown to us (when she asks him about it) that Reggie notices that Charlie went out of his way to touch the dragon. Reggie has that curious and potentially dangerous ability to see and hear what’s there vs what convention dictates she should see and hear – a young Holmes. There are a lot of bits left here that we would have seen used later as Reggie tracked down George via one or all three of the reapers, observed their goings on, and saw and heard the reality of what and who they are – including eventually her sister.

The Trip and George get together is very entertaining and moving and it’s really well done, but as mentioned, something like this was to be expected from the earlier set ups this season. However, there was an unexpected and odd little possible hint of PTB interference / manipulation in connection with the reap of Trip’s father not unlike we’ve already seen. And it’s typically understated.

George’s postit says she will meet her reap in the ‘Card Room’ at the country club. She dutifully goes there and meets Trip. When she hears Trip’s name she assumes he is her intended reap, panics (Trip is after all the only one with that name in the Card Room), and runs outside where Trip catches up to her and she then meets his father – the actual intended reap –and she takes his soul. In the process we’re shown the postit (unnecessarily since we the audience aren’t confused about the names by this point), but it does clearly show us that the reap was to take place in the Card Room. The father never goes into the Card Room, and George certainly did not have to go there to find the father. So the possibility is left to ponder that the forbidden fling with Trip was engineered by the PTB by their deliberate misstatement of the reap location.

Roxy and Mason end up sitting in a plane waiting for their reaps to die and never do get to go to Cancun, but we learn that Mason has never flown before, which raises the question if he died in the UK (likely, but not a fact) how did he get to Seattle?

Two final items. We get another example of what seems to be a habit for George to call home to listen to the voices of her family. We know from prior episodes that this goes on and that Reggie believes the caller is George whereas Joy sees these calls as pranks and annoying. Grandma picks up the phone in this episode and probably unusually George ventures to exchange a few words her. She seems to try to say something and falters (PTB auto interference?) but does get a few words out. Clearly Grandma feels something tickling her, but what she thinks is left ambiguous- it’s not enough.

The most important dialogue stands out for not fitting in the episode except perhaps as preparation for something to come later. I see it as an important element in warning of that darker side of reaper circumstances intended to balance or redirect from the move in S2 to upgrade our reapers from the fringe and involve them with guys like Trip and country clubs. The more involved with and among the living the reapers are the more certain and precise the means by the PTB needs to be to keep any knowledge of the reapers away from the living. Anyway, at minute 36 George enters the WH where we find Rube and Daisy hanging out together. We get another affirmation of the family/fatherly connection when Rube orders a hot oatmeal cookie for George and leaves George and Daisy together. Then this exchange occurs – very friendly with the very odd twist at the end.

G: What’s up with him?
D: I’m not sure. We were at a school today.
He acts really strange around kids.
(A hint that Rube’s 80 years of compartmentalization is breaking down.)
G: Hmm.
D: Stranger.
How was the Montgomery Club?
G: Stuffy, entitled, b*llsh*t.
I really liked it.
D: Hmm. I so really proud of you.
G: I think I’m gonna go back.
G: Hmm. What’s his name?
G: Trip
D: Trip!
Kiffany: Here you go Sweetheart.
G: Thank you, Kiffany.
D: Trip
G: I kissed him.
And then I reaped his dad.
D: Complicated.
Good kisser?
G: Hmmm. Smart. Funny.
D: Money?
G: Please.
Up until his dad died I thought he was gonna be my first boyfriend.
D: Huh mm. And now?
G: He’s my first boyfriend.
D: Well…..It’s a little risky, Georgia.
G: What have I got to lose?
D: …….Everything.


(George gets a puzzled look on her face.)

Given Daisy’s history in the series as far as interactions (reputed) with the living, it is very odd that she would be chosen to deliver this warning to George about her seemingly mild interaction (kissing – so far) with Trip. It makes it stand out all the more and it stands alone and unexplained. George’s puzzled reaction is a clear signal to the audience that we should be puzzled too, but we never find out why. Likely this was to be used in the S3 and maybe then it would have been more clear what that threat meant.
Dead Like Me Resurrection pending

#49 Danioton

Danioton

    Viper Pilot

  • Full Members
  • Pip
  • 103 posts

Posted 26 January 2013 - 10:17 PM

Ep 208 The Escape Artist (continued)


(1) Georgia Voice Over: I’ve never belonged to a club. I mean, I get them, I just don’t want to be in them. Like book clubs. Hey, check out how smart we are. We can read. Shut up, already.

And bicycle clubs, what’s that about? One guy in a bad outfit, you’re a tool. Four guys in the same goofy shirt. Suddenly, you’re the sh*t. Gimme a break.

My parents always told me to join some club at school. Any club at all, just pick a card, but I didn’t.

And then a club finally picked me. I don’t think this is what my parents had in mind.


(2) (George’s voiceover shows us some of the patrons of the Waffle Haus before focusing on the booth with Daisy, George, Roxy, and Mason. Rube shows up and because a baby is crying he has them move to another booth where Rube hands out postits. Oddly Rube has already eaten at another diner down the street. He calls it an escape from routine.

First Roxy and Mason get plane tickets and one postit each. Mason panics at the thought of being on a plane crashing in the ocean - he can’t die but he likes to avoid uncompensated pain and suffering. With Rube looking on with approval we see the new upgraded Georgia – smarter and more alluring – as she quickly reasons that based on just two posits the plane will not crash. Daisy points to Georgia’s postit at the Montgomery Club – a country club where the smarts and alluring upgrade will soon come in handy. Daisy explains the prospects - money.)

Rube: President of the math club.
George: Just smarter than Mason.
Mason: Really?
Daisy: Well look at you.
G: What’s the Montgomery Club?
D: Old-line country club, beautiful golf course, old money. Big money. Money, money.
R: Don’t get lost on the green.
D: She gets a VIP Reap last week, and this week, uh…..a Montgomery Club? It’s just not fair.
R: Well, that’s not my call. Humor me? Give yourself extra time. See how that other half lives.
G: Isn’t that what I’ve been doing?
D: Nothing for me today?
R: No, nothing for you today.
D: What’s yours?
R: Me? I’ve got a (he repeats an address with a room #).
D: Sounds like a hotel. Maybe a murder.
R: Maybe.
D: Kinda in the mood for a murder.
R: Eh.

(Short stretch of dialogue packing a lot of changes in direction in plot and characters.

Mason gets confirmed in his dumber mode – not new – but George gets singled out for those extra smarts when she points out the logic behind why his airline ticket connected postit will not lead to an uncomfortable plane crash.

Daisy’s friendly complaint about George’s VIP Reap and then George’s receiving this country club reap elicits from Rube another confirmation of the consistently followed rule that reaps are not assigned to specific reapers by Rube.

A bit unusual – perhaps the church scene in the last episode helped these two bond a bit when Daisy left the cross and her religion in the church – we have Rube and Daisy in a very odd friendly mode here. Rube is smiling at Daisy and willing to allow her to go on his reap. She hears it’s at a hotel and suspects a murder, which she’s in the mood for – a set up for the coming hotel scene/murder in which she has a bit of a breakdown. But we don’t know why she is attracted to a hotel murder and later we really don’t find out why she falls apart when she gets hers – another loose end for the S3. Notice right at the end of the scene the odd perhaps skeptical look George has at seeing this new warm and fuzzy interaction between Rube and Daisy.

Rube in the past and in particular in connection with Daisy has not reacted well to religion at least anything religious close to home. When it’s far away – some obscure tribe and an even more obscure custom then he likes to talk about it and as it happens often in our story inflict it upon George to explain why she should toe the line. Here tho now that Daisy has abandoned her brief fling with Catholicism she and Rube seem almost best buddies. This is probably about Rube not so much Daisy who is helping here to define Rube. Why he had such a problem with his own religious roots would likely have been explained as his backstory got further unlayered next season.

There are two more brief but important hints about Rube packed into this scene and worthy of note. The baby crying pretty much goes unremarked and unnoticed by the other reapers, but seriously bothers Rube – and this isn’t the first time – remember the airport scene some time back when Rube had to write out an apology for saying he wanted to kill a crying baby. Again something in that back story.

The third is the fact he went to another diner before showing up to distribute postits explaining it was a break from routine. Mr. Routine of several decades suddenly needs to eat breakfast down the street – perhaps a sign of Rube’s decompartmentalization – Rube is breaking down?)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(4) (At the Lass house Grandma is at the breakfast table with Reggie introducing her to one of her high fiber healthful recipes – something Reggie is immediately skeptical of. It comes out that Grandma was managing a Llama ranch in New Mexico in 1975 while young Joy was back home in Seattle. This scene sketches the deep and long running division between Joy and her mother. We learn that Joy has a sister – a set up for a future season?)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(7) (The front of Reggie’s school.)

GVO: I guess when you want to run away from your life, you just make a break for it and hope no one is looking.

(And we see Reggie walking towards the entrance with Charlie the child reaper skateboarding by her. At the entrance, Francis – the nerd with the crush on Reggie - has collected a small crowd with his Komodo dragon in a box. He asks Reggie to be his assistant and Charlie approaches, asks to touch the dragon, and is refused forcing him to get inside the school.

Francis explains to the small gathering outside the school that the dragon’s name is Frodo, which Charlie doesn’t recognize. We learn – as does Reggie - that Charlie has been dead for the last seven years, and we get to see his postit for Frodo.)

Reggie: What’s his name?
Francis: Frodo.
Charlie: Who?
R: Like the Hobbit?
F: What have you been dead for the last six years?
C: Seven.

(Reggie looks at Charlie taking in his words in without comment – for now.


As the kids break up at the sound of the bell to enter the school we get a hint that Charlie is older than his appearance would suggest as he already has picked up on the crush Francis has for Reggie. He says to Reggie that ‘Goldilocks likes you’ – referring to Francis.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(8) (George drives her red mustang up to the valet parking at the Montgomery Club. She shows her street smarts in trying to bluff her way into the Club name dropping her reap’s name – Hesbourgh – which is overheard by Trip who invites her to sit with him while she waits for T. Hesbourgh, and the alluring traits come into play as she and Trip hit it off.)

GVO: Cute. A little country clubby, but cute. (George’s first observations on Trip.)

Trip: I’m Trip.

GVO: Of course you are.

G: I’m George.
T: As in Georgia?
G: (nods)
T: That’s a cute nickname.
G: It’s not a nickname, TRIP.

(George, half-heartedly feigning an identity as a process server, breaks the news to Trip that Mr. Hesbourgh is being sued.

George is breaking with reaper protocol here by using her real name and not her assumed one – Millie – which will become problematical in a later episode.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(10) (Rube and Daisy show up at the postit address and discover it’s a school not a hotel. Rube is not happy – noting there’s lots of ‘children’. Mandy has a nasty sore on his lip – odd this wasn’t dealt with by make up since reapers shouldn’t be troubled by such things.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(11) (Trip wants to know why Mr. Hesbourgh is being sued and quickly rips thru George’s server pretense. They get to know each other and a young love takes root – or not. Is George’s flirting indulgence here acceptable for a reaper? It makes for a good story with the new upgraded and evolved (over a dozen episodes) taking-back-some-of-life George, but would Fuller’s George have done this? Also George reveals that she has a sister.)

T: Money or love?
G: (She hesitates) Money.
T: Liar.
G: Do you have a girlfriend?
T: (Shakes head no).
Do you have a boyfriend?
G: (shakes head no)
T: Are you lying?
G: Not about that.

(Then he invites her to dinner - just before she reaps his father.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(13) (At school Rube gets drafted as a substitute teacher. Again we see the two buddying up a lot in contrast to earlier episodes. We get a little reaper humor as Rube pretends to be Daisy’s father – at her suggestion – which he goes along with. And then more reaper humor as Rube says her being so pale is because she’s practically a ghost.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(14) (Roxy and Mason show up to find their seats on a plane waiting to take off. They settle in and meet the stewardesses. We learn Mason has never flown before. How did he get to Seattle from the UK?)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(15) (Back in the classroom Rube is struggling with his temporary teaching duties encouraged by Daisy. Point is made that Rube is not fond of kids, but they like him anyway.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(17) (Joy is paying bills with a little oversight from her mother. Opposite personalities come thru.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(18) (At the plane with Mason and Roxy where Roxy reaps the stewardess well in advance of her actual death.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(19) (Enter the dragon with Charlie and Reggie in tow.

We have three reapers in the classroom with Reggie, and she is getting a really good look at Rube and Daisy in case she missed Rube at her sister’s funeral reception. Likely that any or all three would have been pathways leading back to George/Millie in a third season.

Note that there is no indication that either Daisy or Rube recognize Charlie as a reaper, nor he them.

The dragon escapes leading to the deaths of both the dragon and the janitor – both killed it turns out by the teacher.

Both Reggie and Charlie leave the school.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(22) (At the plane Mason is still waiting for his reap to show.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(22) (At the school in the commotion Charlie retreats out the school with Reggie running to catch up. Reggie is chasing a hunch and one of the more important dialogues of the episode passes a crucial clue to Reggie regarding George – i.e. Charlie knows her. She’s also curious why he touched the dragon. Reggie saw Charlie steal someone’s lunch so she knows how to get Charlie to open up.)

Reggie: Want some chocolate milk?
Charlie: Sure.

Aren’t you going to get into trouble for ditching school?
R: Aren’t you?
C: I don’t have school.
R: Well, what do you do all day?
C: I’m a dragon slayer, I told you.
Now, stop following me.
R: Do you know a girl named George?
C: Was she killed by a toilet seat?
R: (nods)
C: Ya, I’ve heard of her.


(Nothing really absolutely conclusive here - it’s possible a young boy living on the streets who does not go to school would have heard that a girl named George was killed by a toilet seat almost two years before. But to Reggie this becomes another clue meaningful in a larger context of evidence that her sister isn’t gone.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(23) (Trip and George have bonded to the point they’re playing cards while she waits for her reap to show up. And we find out that George is not a great poker player.)

GVO: Trip, Trip, Trip, you are really cute.

(The waiter shows up and in the interaction between the two George learns more about Trip.

GVO: Enough with the f*cking ‘Lovely’ talk like men!

GVO: Ya if he needs someone further up his *ss.


(Trip is complaining about how boring and predictable the country club daily routine is when suddenly George leans over, pulls him in, and kisses him, which broke THIS day’s routine.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(25) (Roxy and Mason are still stuck in the plane, which has been delayed. Mason continues drinking and starts accumulating things left unattended. And finally Mason finds his reap.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(26) (At the country club the game continues and when the waiter comes close George orders more champagne using Trip’s account number.)

Trip: You’re a quick study, George, who has no last name.
George: I have one. You’re just not a clever enough reporter to figure it out.
T: Who said I was a reporter?
G: So you don’t work for the newspaper. You were lying to me.
T: I work for the newspaper, but I’m not a reporter.
I actually write obits.

(Did he write her obit almost two years ago?)

G: I read obits.
T: I write em.
G: I read em.
T: Well, we have that in common, then.
G: Death-fixated.
T: No way.
Deaths celebrate life. A life so well lived that it needs to be written about.

GVO: I really like him.

G: I really like you.

(She kisses him again. As the warm and fuzzy moment is being appreciated by both the waiter returns with the champagne and the lightning strikes.)

Waiter: Anything else, Mr. Hesburgh? (Followed by the thunder.)

(Trip knows immediately that this little fact was better left unsaid as George gets a look of horror as she believes he’s her reap and bolts.)

G: Wait a minute.
You’re T. Hesburgh?
T: Yes. I am.
I’m sorry.
G: Oh my God!
Oh my f*cking God!
(And she runs for the exit.)
T: Hey, wait a second.
(Outside)
T: George! George, wait!
Look, I should have told you my name was Hesburgh, but I was having some fun.
G: Just stay away from me.

T: Wait a second. I wasn’t messing with you. I mean, I guess I was at first, but…I really like you.
(And, another T. Hesburgh walks up to the happy couple.)
G: I really like you too…..

GVO: Just do the job, George. (As George reaches towards Trip to take his soul…..)

Thomas Hesburgh Junior: As I live and breathe, Thomas Hesburgh III.
G: What?
T: Hey, Dad.
G: Who are you?!
T: I’m Thomas Hesburgh III. I’m the third, Trip. I know, but that’s the hand I was dealt. Thanks a lot, Dad.
TH J: Hi. And I’m Thomas Hesburgh
G: Hi.
So you’re three.
Then you’re……
TH J: Junior

(At this point the writers/director give us an unnecessary really good look (the name confusion is clear to the audience already) at George’s postit and oddly the location given is not where TH J is actually going to die. The postit reads the location as the ‘Card Room’, which is where she met the son, Trip, and is where she would be expecting to meet her reap. TH J never goes inside the country club and certainly not to the Card Room. If she had been directed to the outside front area of the country club she might well have never met Trip and would not have had the fling that is to come. No wonder George is confused. This could be flawed writing, or an intentional detail regarding a subtle interference from the PTB? Given the very pointed display of the postit to the audience it’s probably the latter.

And George reaps the father and a rather complicated sequence of events plays out ending in the father’s death.)

GVO: And just like that, Trip escaped. I wonder if he would’ve seen it that way.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(30) (Back on the plane Roxy and Mason are getting drunk as the plane is delayed and their reaps are just getting around to die.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(31) (Grandma meets Reggie outside school. Reggie relates the days events including the fact she met a boy who she believes knows George. Grandma, of course, knows this can’t be true.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(31) (At the plane the two reaps meet their common destiny and Roxy and Mason fail to get to Cancun. Notice how detached both Roxy and Mason are as the chaos unfolds and two people die.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(33) (At the country club the father’s newly dead soul is taking his own death well as he appears close to George. The two watch Trip desperately try to revive the very dead father’s body. The father, as opposed to Trip’s rather uptight sister later, encourages George to talk to his son. George is still off balanced and a bit tongue tied.)

GVO: I like him. Do I say ‘I’ll call you’? Or do I just give him my number? That’s what Daisy would do. She’d say ‘Here’s my card’.

F*ck, his dad just died.


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(34) (Joy is making the bed when Grandma comes in to talk about Reggie’s issues – she’s concerned about Reggie believing George is still around. These two polar opposites clash – and then Reggie walks in to the two yelling, throwing things, emptying of drawers, etc. But they both agree that Reggie has a problem.)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(36) (Back at the WH we get a scene with two significant elements probably built into the story line in anticipation of future developments – the first concerns the continued budding friendship between Rube and Daisy, and the second, actually likely the much bigger of the two, is the odd warning coming from (or via?) Daisy for George near the end.

George enters the WH and sits down at the booth where lo and behold we find Rube and Daisy hanging out together! Again we get a big signal about something going on - but is it about Daisy, or Rube, or both?

Rube is reading a book learning about Komodo dragons. He orders an oatmeal cookie for George - another affirmation of their family tie? George suspects something bad is coming because of the food gift. But Rube gives both her and Daisy a friendly goodbye and leaves, setting up some important dialogue between George and Daisy.

Rube has left and ……)

G: What’s up with him?
D: I’m not sure. We were at a school today.
He acts really strange around kids.
(A hint that Rube’s 80 years of compartmentalization is breaking down.)
G: Hmm.
D: Stranger.
How was the Montgomery Club?
G: Stuffy, entitled, b*llsh*t.
I really liked it.
D: Hmm. I so really proud of you.
G: I think I’m gonna go back.
G: Hh-hmm. What’s his name?
G: Trip
D: Trip!
Kiffany: Here you go Sweetheart.
G: Thank you, Kiffany.
D: Trip
G: I kissed him.
And then I reaped his dad.
D: Complicated.
Good kisser?
G: Hmmm. Smart. Funny.
D: Money?
G: Please.
Up until his dad died I thought he was gonna be my first boyfriend.
D: Huh mm. And now?
G: He’s my first boyfriend.
D: Well…..It’s a little risky, Georgia.
G: What have I got to lose?
D: …….Everything.


(George gets a puzzled look on her face.

Before this season is over we will get more odd story developments from Daisy (Ray and Rube’s comments on those goings on) but here it is not an accident that the writers chose Daisy (Yes, Daisy) to warn George about having a modest dalliance with one of the living. This would likely put her as a deliberate challenge to our expectations with the resolution not provided until next season or even after. In any case the substance of the warning is that George’s (or by extension any reaper’s) getting involved with one of the living is dangerous putting at risk “everything”. It’s surprising given not only everything Daisy has claimed to have done, but also the adjustment in themes towards reapers, and in particular our Georgia, taking back something of life that was abruptly taken from them. Fuller made it clear reapers are on the fringe and Rube, even after Fuller left, repeats this thought even as the writers shifted towards more lively story lines, but here is an important indication that a shift is – or perhaps – has happened and some new boundary is taking shape. Getting involved with the living is very risky and a reaper could lose ‘everything’ by indulging in that temptation. Who better than Daisy to announce the shift?)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(38) (At the Lass house, Grandma, Joy, and Reggie are enjoying some happy time together when Reggie goes off to bed leaving Grandma to make a sort of peace and say goodbye to Joy and then to discuss Reggie’s issues – something they can agree on.)

Grandma: I worry….about your daughter.
Joy: I know.
G: Both of them.
J: I know.

GVO: I think that everyone wants to escape wherever they are.

(Scene shifts to the plane where Roxy and Mason are clinging to their seats in an empty plane with the clean up crew at work.

We find out that neither has been to Mexico and Mason complains ‘anywhere’ again pointing towards the constraints these reapers exist within – they have free will but very limited personal freedom.)

GVO: People don’t seem happy where they are. They’re always looking for a different place, a different person, just different.

Like my Mom used to say: “The grass is always greener.”


(Shifts to inside the Lass house where it’s morning and Grandma is sitting at the table with Reggie. Joy is nearby.)

Everyone is always searching for the other side.

(Shifts again to another key peek into Rube’s ongoing de-compartmentalization as we see him dialing the telephone with several telephone books in front of him. This is the search to track down his wife and daughter.)

I’m already there, and I’m still looking.

(Rube gets a dead end as the number he’s dialing is no longer in service.)

(Another shift we see Reggie entering her school, and then Charlie watching her.)

No one will admit it, but people desperately want to be in clubs. Especially the ones they can’t join.

(And we see George returning to the country club looking for Trip whom she sees out on the green focused on putting.)

And I don’t know what to do now that I’ve found the one I want to belong to.

(She watches Trip from a distance and then walks away.)

So I went back to the only one that would have me for a member.

(George is looking forlorn sitting at the WH booth alone nursing a cup of coffee.)

Kiffany: You still waiting for your friends, Hon?
George: Yeah.
K: I’ll come back.

GVO: And just because I had no one to talk to, didn’t mean I couldn’t listen.

(And we see George at the WH public phone making yet another call home – something it appears she does often – and this time it’s Grandma who picks up. And hearing her voice stirs memories for George, and we get something unusual as George - instead of saying nothing – actually talks to Grandma, tho notice she can’t identify herself – whether she tried or not isn’t clear. Even tho it appears Grandma’s instincts are tickled and she feels something…..)


Grandma: Hello? Lass residence.

(We see George’s memory of Grandma and George discussing her not returning to college. Grandma gives George a necklace with a frog – symbolizing ‘new life, transformation’. Somewhat ironically we have Grandma asking George for a promise not to let life escape her.)

George: Hello?
Gr: Can I help you?
Ge: Hi….this is…………Is this the lady of the house?
Gr: No, the lady of the house is doing something extremely important. I think it involves a dust buster.
Who is this?
Ge: ………. (says nothing)
Gr: Who is this?
Ge: I have the wrong number.
(We get some long pauses on both sides before each hangs up. You can almost see wheels turning in Grandma’s head here.


George returns to the booth where we see Daisy. The two exchange some friendly talk and we see a close up of that frog necklace on George’s neck given to her by Grandma.)

GVO: As a little girl, I used to think my Grandma was a little loony. Now I get that she was just really alive. If I only knew then what I know now. Eh. Join the club.


Dead Like Me Resurrection pending

#50 Danioton

Danioton

    Viper Pilot

  • Full Members
  • Pip
  • 103 posts

Posted 17 March 2013 - 05:59 PM

To fans of the series it's well known that in the last episode of the last season there is a new rule in the DLM Universe that got sprung on the audience - on Halloween and the day after (Day of the Dead) the reapers revert in appearance to the living to look as they did when alive. However, this interpretation has always had problems and as I was reviewing the last episodes for summary (as above) another interpretation occurred to me that makes more sense and fits with the given dialogue much better. Anyway..


Proposed revision to the Double Image Exception rule (60/215) 3/2013: The reaper appearance reversion would apply only for the living, who knew the reaper when they were alive. All other among the living would not see any difference in appearance of any of the reapers they see every day.

The first version of the rule seems to be that on Halloween and the day after all reapers revert to their former living appearance to the living. Rube said George should wear a mask because she was a reaper near where she had lived. Oddly Mason refers to this as a reaper legend. This rule and Mason's comment is odd because if ALL living saw a reversion on those days and night then it sure would stand out and be noticed e.g by Kiffany over the last 30 years. And the reapers would have to take more steps to guard against it, but Mason calls it a legend.

We have three concrete examples of one of the living in that episode recognizing a reaper - first up is Daisy who is recognized by the doorman of a hotel she used to frequent when alive. Second would be when George is recognized by Crystal, and then lastly is when Reggie sees George in the cemetery in that last scene.

Since most reapers seem to work in the afterlife far away from where they lived that might account for why Mason called it a legend - most reapers would never experience being recognized.

Kiffany didn't know any of the reapers when they were alive so for her they look the same on Halloween and the day after. There's still the separate but unrelated problem as to why she doesn't notice that over 30 years none of them seems to age.

Rube knows it's not a legend because he like George was a reaper near his family, so he brings George a mask.

The doorman knew Daisy by sight and name when she was alive so he could and did recognize her in the WH.

Crystal also knew and talked to George when she came in to interview and later when she worked her first and last half day at Happy Time so she would recognize her.

Of course Reggie would too.

In both interpretations of the rule George could never go in to work at Happy Time on Halloween or the day after, but in the old former case this would be true not only for her but for all reapers everywhere who would have to explain the sudden and temporary appearance change every year. That's not workable.

In the new latter case only a few reapers would ever have this problem (therefore it's a legend) since it seems from our limited sample that the great majority are placed far from where they lived. That's more workable as Daisy demonstrated when she simply denied what one isolated old man (the doorman) was witnessing (as opposed to a whole workplace full of people seeing the difference simultaneously as in the former case for all reapers or even in the latter if George showed up at HT on Halloween).

In retrospect I suspect that the writers intended Mason's comment (it's only a legend) to trigger this latter interpretation, but in practice it didn't work, because I've never seen/read that version in any forum before. And it didn't occur to me until recently. Better late than never but …
Dead Like Me Resurrection pending

#51 Danioton

Danioton

    Viper Pilot

  • Full Members
  • Pip
  • 103 posts

Posted 29 May 2013 - 08:57 PM

Ep 209 Be Still My Heart
 
 
“The cool thing about being a reaper was 
You kind of had a second chance to make things right.”
 
“And you never really know what death will make you do.
How you try to defy it.
To reach past what’s possible.
How you struggle to fit the pieces together 
Even tho they’re way too broken to bother.”  - Georgia Lass
 
 
“Since sweets and beauties do themselves forsake
And die as fast as they see others grow;
And nothing ‘gainst time’s scythe can make defense 
Save breed, to brave him when he takes thee hence.”   - Shakespeare

 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
 
The up front focus in this episode is George’s dalliance with Trip and how this fits into the larger conflict reapers have concerning where the boundaries are between their ‘second chances’ among the living.  
 
We also have the pairing of the two characters who so affect each other thru-out the series – Rube and George.  Rube is pushing boundaries seeking to resume a forbidden relationship with his still living daughter, and in this episode we’re shown how George feels compelled to push a boundary of her own seeking companionship with this forbidden living man.  Both are breaking rules seeking to fill a void.  Rube turned his back on his family and for 80 years felt nothing until George and that envelope upset his peace of mind.  George was a teenager going nowhere fast without purpose who had her life taken from her and purpose only forced upon her by her own death, which oddly triggered her to begin growing up albeit within tight boundaries.  This part of her story she is testing just where those boundaries are – for her and implied for reapers in the DLM universe.
 
One fascinating aspect of DLM is how the storytelling tells the audience so much about the characters and their arcs by deliberating withholding information vs spoon feeding it.  These characters are defined by what we don’t know – by the layering of new questions for every little tidbit of new information we’re allowed.
 
Coffee is used as a continuity link thru-out carrying double duty as referring to sex, but also signaling a common problem among our reapers – they can’t sleep at night due to their struggles with their post death individual predicaments.  Rube, Daisy, and Roxy all have problems sleeping but not due to coffee.  With Roxy she says openly she has nightmares, but this is left undeveloped.  Rube is more subtle with his saying he won’t drink after lunch – to control his nightmares? – but then after Roxy leaves the booth he contemplates her leftover coffee (and his trip?) before drinking it down.  Daisy is a bundle of issues as we learn she can’t sleep either – more questions raised even as a few get answered. Given coffee’s role to carry a little symbolism thru-out the episode – when Trip brings George some coffee in bed, he pops the perfect bubble saying ‘this was fun’. George tries the coffee and it burns her tongue meaning George just got burned with her first venture testing those boundaries beyond virgin territory.
 
Daisy is prominent as we learn more about her post death predicament, and Mason, even tho he superficially comes across as an idiot, when we look at what he does off screen he shows a deeper wisdom – because without his actions George and Trip could not have gotten together.  
 
We can interpret Rube’s current struggle with his past as in a way foretelling a possible future for George  - very different, but running in parallel very intentionally.  Rube first tested his boundaries some 80 years before – George is testing the limits now with Trip– and Rube is struggling to fit broken pieces back together 80 years later - today.  There is an intriguing set-up easily overlooked - Rube’s photo of his wife and daughter shown to us towards the end of the episode.  
 
And once again we have Shakespeare giving advice to the living reminding us how constrained that second chance for reapers is and perhaps that some things can never be made right for our reapers.
 
The opening quotes above capture the themes running thru this episode.  The first from Georgia’s voiceover:
 
“The cool thing about being a reaper was 
You kind of had a second chance to make things right.”
 
This is not at all new and has been a primary concern since the first season.  The culmination in this episode is Georgia’s loss of her virginity to one of the living – Trip.  A dalliance with the living isn’t something new given Daisy’s frequent anecdotes along those lines, but the producers/writers are well aware of the conflicts these would cause in the DLM universe and they show us some of those crosscurrents.  But also there’s the unresolvable conflict between the original Fuller theme of existing on the fringe colliding with the later theme of these reapers struggling to come to terms with the fact they were once alive and now they’re not and that now they are denied so much even as they have to exist immersed / surrounded by temptations.  And this brings us to the second quote also from Georgia’s voiceover:
 
“And you never really know what death will make you do.
How you try to defy it.
To reach past what’s possible.
How you struggle to fit the pieces together 
Even tho they’re way too broken to bother.”  
 
Where is the boundary for these undead reapers?  All the reapers in their own way give us a look at their struggles to fit their separate broken pieces together in this episode. The writers make this search very explicit with George’s reap of Gordon at the wedding – conveniently just before she meets up with Trip – in which Gordon asks if he might find his significant other on that other side. Gordon’s other side is beyond the lights.  For George the other side is right where she is standing still among the living and she’s says ‘I’m still trying to figure it out myself’.  
 
With Rube, it’s a family connection, his daughter, that he walked away from some 80 years previously and that he now is desperately attempting ‘to reach past what’s possible’ ‘to fit the pieces together even tho they’ may be ‘too broken to bother’.
 
The producers/writers in the third quote draw – again – upon Shakespeare to point directly at a constraint always pulling them back from their desires to connect and that keeps them on the sidelines:
 
“Since sweets and beauties do themselves forsake
And die as fast as they see others grow;
And nothing ‘gainst time’s scythe can make defense 
Save breed, to brave him when he takes thee hence.”  
 
Joy is used to tell us what to understand from this ‘It means you should have kids.  Because then you’re never alone’.  But reapers are sterile and are forbidden to marry and by extension form relationships with the living because they’re dead, or undead, and supposed to live on the fringe.  That leaves them forbidden to interact with their still living relatives and so condemned to struggle on the fringe or left with defying death to struggle with those broken pieces.  Within this DLM universe as created by Fuller and further defined by Godchaux/Masius, this boundary is left in fog for us and for the reapers themselves.
 
To home in on the problem, suppose Trip did call George back and wanted to develop matters, then what?  Is this possible? At what point would the Powers That Be intervene and what would they do?  And in Rube’s case what exactly will he do when he finds his daughter?  Or is his long abandoned relationship too broken?  As Mason warns George about revealing too much and as comes out of Roxy’s interrogation of Rube and his decision to lie to her – there is some real danger to them that these reapers are aware of should they go over some boundary.
 
When Rube decides to take a trip for ‘research’ he turns to Roxy to cover for him and this emphasizes she his is right hand even tho she is not the most senior reaper – both Mason and Daisy are older.  Rube and Roxy’s dialogue tells us the extent of Rube’s defying upper management.
 
And Rube is transgressing in going on this little trip and as close as he is to Roxy it’s revealing that he lies to her about whom he sent the envelope to and whether they are still alive  - his daughter is very much alive.  Rube admits to Roxy he sent a letter to someone alive when he was dead – and we can guess from the dialogue that this is a very bad thing for a reaper to ever do.  But, notice here there is a boundary that Rube decides not to cross even with Roxy and he lies to her to hide his full transgression.  We already know he did not send the letter to Lucy, his wife, who is most probably long dead by now, but to Rosie, who Rube seems to believe is alive today.  Given Roxy’s smarts, she, and we, guess that Rube is actually researching the whereabouts of someone alive.  We know it’s his daughter, but Roxy is in the dark on this aspect. Rube and Roxy know that Rube has crossed over into dangerous ground, but Rube can’t help himself as he feels compelled to go thru with his search.  The reason we’ve been given is his receipt of that returned envelope of cash, but we also know – it’s embedded thru-out the two seasons – that another reason is George’s influence.
 
At the opening, Mason plays the fool again fumbling his cinnamon bun juggling but we can see a hint in Daisy’s reaction that she’s a bit more warm to him – ‘Your heart’s in the right place’ - instead of outright condemnation as from Rube.
 
We can see again how an important message is delivered from an unusual source.  In the prior episode Daisy oddly warned George at the very end (What have I got to lose? Everything).   At the memorial service for Trip’s father, Mason is used to tell George and emphasize for us that she is transgressing a boundary that even Mason understands is dangerous when he warns her not to give her last name – Georgia Lass is dead.  
 
Note that twice in this episode Mason, who so often is portrayed as a bumbling idiot, very adroitly handles people interactions with a third hinted.  
 
First after George has to leave the memorial service after a very bad blowup with Trip’s sister, Ashley, it’s Mason who tells Trip George’s address. Trip and George could not have gotten together but for Mason’s direct intervention. 
 
AND second he pretends that George lost one of her earrings giving it to Trip to return to George knowing full well that Trip might falter on his own, but given a duty to return a valued keepsake – the earring – the gentleman, Trip, is almost guaranteed to follow through and deliver it personally to George.  These are the earrings we clearly see George hand – both of them – over to Mason as she leaves the service.  
 
We don’t know the wisdom of what he’s done (since we don’t know the boundaries George is exploring/pushing against either), but Mason very nicely is the catalyst bringing these two together – a dutiful and loyal big brother.  
 
The second example, at the end of the episode, Daisy has had a rough day – that hotel reap - and is shown emotionally drained sitting at the WH counter alone –much in need of emotional support.  Mason at first doesn’t see this but soon picks up on Daisy’s desperation and instead of crudely hitting on her he turns into a good listening friend when Daisy signals her need to talk about her sister who for reasons we don’t know is somehow connected to Daisy’s very bad reaction at the hotel.
 
So Mason’s actions to bring Trip and George together take place out of sight – and only mentioned in passing by Trip – and we know Mason listened to Daisy and they had a good talk, but there is one more layer to his unseen unmentioned actions.  Note that in the morning – and presumably the night before - Trip and George are left undisturbed well into the sun rising.  Trip while George slept in moved around inside the house preparing coffee without apparently running into anyone else.  Mason ensured that Daisy and he remained out of sight or perhaps they together did so.  This Mason is not at all an idiot, and this Daisy is not the same character, who barged into George’s apartment and stole her bed.  
 
Roxy and Daisy over the hotel reap and later Mason and Daisy because of the hotel reap have important conversations which raise more questions than deliver answers, and Daisy gives us an intriguing hint about Rube.
 
We learn that the name of the murderer was left behind by Daisy on a hotel notepad making the arrest a no brainer.  So Daisy stayed long enough to write down the name of the murder, but didn’t escort her reap.  This is another major breach of reaper boundaries as Roxy is used to make clear.  
 
Roxy has a fascinating position playing two roles – both a reaper and a cop.  It is conceivable that she could reap a murder victim and know who the culprit is – as a reaper, but, as a cop, have to pretend she does not know.  This is ironic since she herself is a murder victim and we don’t know what happened to her murderer.  We do know she has nightmares and we can guess those nightmares are connected.  This is another aspect that never got explored in the two seasons.
 
In passing Daisy tells us something possibly important with regard to Rube.  Of our reaper gang we know the least about Rube’s death.  For some reason Rube’s sensitivity is reaping kids, but in what little we saw of his interactions with his daughter when alive he seemed balanced.  We know he obtained a gun from flashbacks, and he used it to earn his own wanted poster.  Could he have somehow caused the death of an innocent child on the way to getting his face plastered on that wanted poster?
 
We learned that a reaper can in fact have a liaison with one of the living without upper management issuing a cease and desist order so we know the boundary extends that far, but not how far it could go.  George clearly is disappointed that it didn’t go farther and longer, but she doesn’t know where it is either.  In any case Daisy’s stories have at least some support.  
 
Notice the photo that Rube shows us as he’s packing for his trip.  It’s a cherished photo of, we suppose, his wife and daughter.  Now as Rube explained to George not so long before all a reaper gets to keep are memories.  George pushed those boundaries and stole a few photos from the Lass house (and picked at least one up at her gravestone – left by Reggie).  How did Rube come by this photo?  He had to obtain it after he died?  At his gravestone?  Not likely, but…..?    Or did he somehow remove it when he paid an unauthorized visit to wherever his wife and daughter were living in Seattle?  The brief glimpse of that photo reemphasizes the developing relationship and parallels between Rube and George.
 
 
At the end George is still plugging away as she brings the CPR dummy back to ‘life’. 


Dead Like Me Resurrection pending

#52 Danioton

Danioton

    Viper Pilot

  • Full Members
  • Pip
  • 103 posts

Posted 29 May 2013 - 09:16 PM

Ep 209 Be Still My Heart (continued)
 
 
(1) (Opening with Georgia Voiceover on morning rituals.)
 
GVO: Every family has its morning rituals.  I know mine did.  The gun went off at 7 rise and shine.  Actually we were never that big on the shine, but ….what I really remember about morning was……coffee.  The smell of it.  The sounds of it.  Everyone in my family loved coffee.
 
(The opening scenes start with dated shots of generic families in the morning and then shifts to the Lass family in the morning currently.  First shown is the Lass house with Joy and Reggie, and then Clancy living alone and his coffee, and lastly Georgia coffee cup in hands at the Waffle Haus in the reaper booth.  In front of her face someone (Daisy) is holding the newspaper obituaries.  This opening nicely emphasizes that tho dead Georgia is very much connected to her living family- symbolized by the role of coffee in their daily morning rituals.)
 
GVO: This sounds weird, but sometimes I think it’s the one thing we all loved.
 
(The scene opens to show Daisy and George in the booth with Kiffany bringing more coffee as George grabs the paper from Daisy’s hands.  Poor Daisy just looks first resentful and then resigned. And then we jump into a continuation of the main arc – Trip - from the last episode.)
 
George: Can I see the obits?
 
(As Kiffany serves up more coffee, George looks over the obits and then says:)
 
G: It’s my guy.  (She returns the paper to Daisy pointing to a picture of Trip’s father.)
That’s the guy I kissed.
D: He’s old and dead.
G: The guy I kissed isn’t dead.  That’s his dad.  I reaped his dad.  And his memorial service is today at 3:00.
D: Wear something black and short.
G: Really? You think I should go?
D: Absolutely.  Point Grey Club.  Mmm elegant. Maybe something….. black and long.
G: What’s that expression?  Don’t **** where you eat.  Don’t **** where you reap. I’m definitely not going.
D: Do you want me help you pick out an outfit?
G: Yeah. Please.
 
(Mason shows up with a bag of still warm cinnamon buns that both women help themselves to.  Their pleasure is rudely cut short as Mason tells them the buns come form his reap of a guy that very morning who killed himself at the bakery using the frosting applicator – cut his hand off.  He helpfully explains he wiped the blood off these buns.  Rube shows up to deliver reaps for Daisy and George, who gets a 4:00 reap. When George expresses dismay (‘A girl has a life’) Rube wants to know why. He admonishes her to ‘juggle things’, which prompts Mason to make a fool of himself here attempting to juggle buns hitting Rube in the face. Notice Daisy’s face watching this interaction is a bit softer towards Mason than her normal baseline contempt – ‘Your heart’s in the right place.’ She says.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(4) (We shift to Reggie’s classroom where the teacher is critiquing a student presentation on the heart and she says ‘Your heart’s not in the right place.’  The geek who has the crush on Reggie goes up next and shows off what appears to be a real human heart obtained via eBay from an address in Africa.  Reggie is next and she doesn’t have a presentation and gets a reprieve until tomorrow.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(6) (At Happy Time in front of Crystal’s reception desk we see George and Misty discussing coffee as a euphemism for sex – something new to George.  George believes the coffee tastes different today.  The conversation is used to confirm for the audience that George is a virgin – just in case that got overlooked.)
 
Misty: When was the last time you had sex, Millie?
 
GVO: Ah..never.
 
Millie/George: Oh..it’s .. been a while.
 
(When Delores joins them continuing the coffee as sex, a coworker collapses in front of Delores having an apparent heart attack.)
 
Misty: Is he going to die?
 
GVO: Don’t look at me.  I don’t have his postit.
 
(Delores calls a ‘code blue’ looks to Millie who just says ‘I wasn’t here that day’ -  the man ‘dies’ prompting Delores to promise more CPR training for everyone tomorrow morning.)
 
Delores: It’s a little unsettling getting that close to death, isn’t it?
 
GVO: Not so much.
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(8) (At the Waffle Haus we see Daisy and Roxy at the booth discussing George and her situation with Trip, but it quickly devolves into a reopening of the conflict between Roxy’s realism and open contempt for Daisy’s self delusions. Roxy notices that Daisy’s cross is gone and asks what happened  - did she lose it.  Daisy admits to losing both her faith and her cross.  She explains she was just acting the part.  They return to discussing George with Daisy sure, because she can’t go with her (Daisy’s reap at the hotel conflicts with the memorial service) to the memorial service, George will chicken out.  She underestimates George’s resourcefulness – in this case drafting Mason to go with her.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(10) (Mason and George enter the memorial service descending stairs.  George is dressed up to fit the somber occasion – Mason is not and stands out wearing a green T-shirt in a crowd of formal black suits and dresses.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(11) (At the Lass house, Joy is getting a reluctant Reggie prepared to be picked up by Clancy for the night. It comes out that the heart presentation is due tomorrow and Reggie shamelessly manipulates Joy into doing the heart model for her.  As usual George and the hurt is never far below the surface of the conversation and she pops up here.  Joy says the teachers liked George. Reggie wants to know why she dropped out of college  - the response from Joy  - ‘to make me mad.’)
 
Reggie: I sort of didn’t finish that biology project.
Joy: The heart model?  I thought that was due today.
R: It was.
 
J: What am I supposed to do with all that papier-mâché I bought mmm. Put it in the basement?  Along with your drum set and your riding clothes?  The teenage graveyard.
R: It’s not a graveyard.
J: I know.  It’s just an expression.
R: Mrs. Ricket said I could have more time.
J: Mm. That was very nice of Mrs. Ricket.
 
R: She had George in her class.
J: Mrs. Ricket was very fond of George.  A lot of George’s teachers liked her.
R: So why did she drop out of college?
J: To make me mad. (chuckles)
R: Really?
J: No.   I don’t know what happened.  I think she would’ve gone back, you know, eventually.
I don’t know.
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(13) (Daisy’s on site at her reap in a hotel.  She’s dressed up as a housekeeping maid to gain entry into the room and talk to the woman, a mistress, who will be murdered by her lover.  She wants to move to the next level – i.e. dump the current wife.  Daisy pretends to leave, but hides in the closet to witness the goings on.  She leaves the door open slightly so she and we can see, and the murderer doesn’t notice!  Probably not meant to be an indication that reapers can make themselves ‘unnoticed’ as hinted at in the pilot, but it seems an indication that to make the DLM world work they would have to have that ability to do their reaps.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(16) (At the memorial service, Mason is misbehaving and uncontrollable stressing George to no end.  Trip enters the interaction and George introduces Mason to Trip.  Trip even tho he’s not sure about who (or what) Mason is handles the situation with aplomb pointing out to Mason the open bar, which leaves Trip alone with George – for a minute or so.)
 
Trip: You know, if you keep crashing my club, people will start to talk.
George: (whispering) What will they say?
T: That you like me.
Trip’s sister: Trip (motions for him to come over.)
T: Oh, just .. give me one second, will you.
(as he’s leaving)
G: So let them talk. (which gets an appreciative smile from Trip as he walks away.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(18) (Daisy in the closet witnesses the actual murder and is visibly traumatized.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(19) (At the memorial service we see Mason talking to a picture of old dead woman on the wall of the club and this is noticed by Trip as he joins George sitting near a fireplace.  George is caught off guard by his opening remark.)
 
Trip: Do you talk to dead people?
G: What?!
T: Your friend … he was talking to a dead woman.
 
GVO: Haa, who do you think you’re talking to, buster?
 
T: So …Mason…why did you bring him?
G: I guess I wasn’t sure.
T: About?
G: You.
He’s kinda my insurance policy.
T: What if I told you that when we were burying my father, I flashed on kissing you?  And when I was delivering his eulogy, I flashed on kissing you?  I  uh  I know it’s not normal, but…
G: I think when someone you really love dies, you get a pass on normal.
Trip’s sister: (from across the room) Trip!  Come say hello to the Fergusons.
G: Who is that?
T: That’s my sister. Ashley.
Look, I’ll be back, All right?
 
(George looks unhappy as Mason shows up to say he thinks it’s time to leave due to his theft of a diamond collar off a small dog.) 
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(21) (Rube, at the Waffle Haus booth, is watching a coffee cup being filled.  He says coffee after lunch keeps him awake.  We see the cup belongs to Roxy who says she up anyway.  This is a key scene in which Rube is passing control of dispensing reaps to Roxy a few days while he goes off to research his daughter’s whereabouts – the result of all those phones calls alluded to earlier.)
 
Rube: If I had coffee after lunch and I’d be up all night.
Roxy: I’m up anyway.
Thanks, Kiffany.
Kiffany: You’re welcome.
Ru: Neighbors?
Ro: Nightmares.
 
(A one word insight into Roxy’s situation – never developed, but worth getting this peek.  At this point in their conversation, Roxy’s radio calls out what is likely the murder at the hotel and Roxy is pressed to leave.)
 
Ru: I can remember when coffee was a nickel.
Ro: Ten cents and a crying baby will keep you up all night.
Ru: (Showing some tension in his face.)  Going away for a couple of days.  I need you to cover for me.
Ro: Where are you going?
Ru: Just away.
Ro: What are you doing?
Ru: I’m doing a little research.
Ro: On what?
Ru: Roxy!
Ro: You ask me for a f*&king favor and then you zip up.  I don’t think so.
Ru: I sent something to someone a long time ago, and it didn’t get to that someone, and I’m trying to do a little follow up.
Ro: Were you dead when you sent it?
Ru: (Distressed face) Roxy!
Ro: Were you dead when you sent it?
Ru: Yes.
Ro: Really?     Is it someone dead or alive today?
Ru: Dead, Roxy.  Coffee was a nickel.  Now leave me alone.  Just let me enjoy my pie in peace.
Ro: Fine.  
 
Ru: Now… do the postits for me (he hands his schedule book to her) I appreciate it.
(Roxy’s radio is calling her attention and she leaves)
Ro: I’ll cover for you.
 
(Rube looks at her remaining coffee and then drinks it down –he’s not sleeping anyway.   
 
This scene has a lot of information.  We know from the stress and discomfort and Roxy’s intense questioning that what Rube is planning is not within acceptable reaper behavior.  His leaving – just for a few days – is a big deal.  Another indication just how constrained even an older experienced reaper like Rube is and by extension we are told just how tightly constrained all reapers are.  They have free will of the mind but not body.  
 
And even tho both Mason and Daisy are much older than Roxy, it’s Roxy Rube turns to for the favor and to confide – partially – his indiscretion.  Reaper ranking - such as it is – is determined by merit not age.  This is a justification later in the Movie – about five years from now -  for turning the team leadership position over to George at its conclusion.  
 
Rube admits to Roxy he sent a letter to someone alive when he was dead – and we can guess from the dialogue that this is a very bad thing for a reaper to ever do.  But, notice tho that there is a boundary that Rube decides not to cross even with Roxy and he lies to her to hide his full transgression.  We already know he did not send the letter to Lucy, his wife, who is most probably long dead by now, but to Rosie, who Rube seems to believe is likely alive today.  Given Roxy’s smarts, she and we guess that Rube is actually researching the whereabouts of someone alive.  We know it’s his daughter, but Roxy is in the dark on this aspect. Rube and Roxy know that Rube has crossed over into dangerous ground, but Rube can’t help himself as he feels compelled to go thru with his research. The reason we’re given here is his receipt of that returned envelope of cash, but we also know – it’s embedded thru-out the two seasons – that the other reason is George’s influence.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(22) (At Clancy’s apartment Reggie is reviewing the evidence – cold hard facts – both seen and not seen in Clancy’s kitchen and she confronts her dad with her conclusion – Charlotte and Clancy have broken up.  Clancy can’t hide anything from Reggie’s relentless cross examination.  
 
Soon Clancy also starts to work on the model of the heart.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(24) (Mason at the open bar is misbehaving and Trip’s sister, Ashley, comes over to examine him close-up.  She comes across as a bit of a b*tch and more than a little controlling, but then we don’t know either her or Trip.  As Mason and Ashley talk we can see Trip and George getting friendly by the fireplace.  Mason reveals that George is Trip’s girlfriend, which she is unhappy about.  While she and Mason are talking George and Trip slip out of room  - and out of her control.  She starts looking for them leaving Mason. )
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(25) (Trip and George are hiding under a table hidden by the tablecloth – something Trip tells George he and his sister used to do when kids.  In the conversation George slips up in a revealing way.)
 
George: Why are we here again?
Trip: Because I don’t want to have to talk to anybody – except you.  My sister and I started doing this when we were kids. Anything to get away.
G: It’s sweet that you talk to your sister.
I totally ignored mine.
T: You don’t talk to her anymore?
G: Why?
T: Well you just  - you used the past tense.

G: How about we not talk about our families
T: Deal.
We don’t have to talk about anything.
 
(They kiss.)
 
GVO: This is so not right.  I have a dead person to deal with.  He’s got a dead person to deal with.  But for just a moment, this was a nice little hiding place.
 
Ashley: (pulls up the tablecloth) Trip.
G: Busted.
A: I haven’t been introduced to your friend.
T: Uh, sorry, uh.  G-George, this is my sister, Ashley.  Ashley, this is George.
G: Hi. I-I’m so sorry for your loss.
A: Thank you.
G: Maybe we should um….
T: Yeah, ladies first.
G: Thank you.
 
(They both pop up from behind the table.)
 
G: Ah. Found my contact lens.  Thank God.  I can’t see a thing.
A: So!  How long have you two lovebirds been together?
T: What’s up, Ashley?
A: Well, I’m just trying to figure out why you’re at our father’s memorial service doing the hideout routine with some girl I’ve never seen before. 
T: Ashley, you’re being impolite.
A: Actually, Trip, you’re being impolite. You have spent all of three seconds talking to dad’s friends.
G: I should probably just go.
A: Don’t be silly.  So…how long have you two been an item?
T: That’s enough, all right?
 
(Mason approaches from behind Ashley.)
 
A: Uh cause, you see,  oh ..Mason here says that George is your girlfriend.
G: Mason!
T: Ya, you know what?  Actually, she is.
G: I am?
A: Ah, well that’s nice.  Welcome to the family.  George…? I didn’t catch your last name?
T: What is your last name?
Mason: No. Don’t.
G: Lass.
A: OK, so she’s your girlfriend and you don’t even know her last name?

M: George, we have to go now.
A: Maybe I’m just a spoilsport, but dad is dead, and this isn’t funny anymore, and you little brother need to grow the f*&k up.
 
(Ashley exits)
 
T: I gotta go.
G: That’s cool.  So do I.
T: Sorry.
G: Don’t be.  Just go do your thing.
 
(Trip exits)
 
M: (For once Mason looks serious.)  You should not have told him your last name.  George Lass is dead.
G: I gotta go reap somebody.  I don’t know what I was thinking.  Who am I kidding? This isn’t me.
 
(She removes both her earrings and hands them to Mason as she exits.)
 
GVO: I had to get out of there.  This place was members only and I was, as Mason said, not really eligible.
 
(Putting aside Trip’s relationship with his older sister who is unsatisfied with his behavior, we can see again how an important message is delivered from an unusual source. Mason is used to emphasize to George and for us that she is transgressing a boundary that even Mason understands is dangerous.  In this episode we have the pairing of the two characters who so affect each other thru-out the series – Rube and George.  Rube is pushing boundaries seeking to resume a forbidden relationship with his still living daughter, and here we’re shown how George feels compelled to push a boundary of her own seeking companionship with this forbidden living man.  Both are breaking rules seeking something among human relationships denied to them as reapers, but where are the limits?  Rube turned his back on his family and for 80 years felt nothing until George and that envelope upset his peace of mind.  George was a teenager going nowhere fast without purpose who had her life taken from her and purpose forced upon her by her own death, which oddly forced her to begin growing up albeit within tight boundaries.  This part of her story she is testing just where those boundaries are.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(28) (The police including Roxy are at the hotel after Daisy’s reap is murdered.  As the other police leave Roxy remains behind and when they’re alone she approaches the ghost of the murdered mistress, who is bewildered and confused in the corner, and tenderly escorts off to her lights.  We know Daisy was there, but we don’t know why she didn’t take care of her reap.  We also learn that the name of the murderer was left behind by Daisy on a hotel notepad making the arrest a no brainer.  So Daisy stayed long enough to write down the name of the murder, but didn’t escort her reap.  This is another major breach of reaper boundaries as Roxy will make clear later.  Roxy has a fascinating position playing two roles – both a reaper and a cop.  It is very conceivable that she could reap a murder victim and know very well who the culprit is – as a reaper, but as a cop, have to pretend she does not know.  This is ironic since she herself is a murder victim and we don’t know what happened to her murderer.  We do know she has nightmares and we can guess those nightmares are connected. This is another aspect that never got explored in the two seasons.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(30) (George gets to the site of her reap and it’s at a gay wedding where she reaps one of the guests.)
 
GVO: I had it all wrong.  You don’t go to a funeral to meet a guy.  You go to a wedding, ……where there’s lots of guys.  All guys.  All the time.
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(32) (Joy has to cancel an evening with friends in order to complete Reggie’s heart model.)
 
GVO: Sometimes you just have to lose yourself in your work.  Losing yourself in your work, could be a good thing.
 
(View shifts to wedding reap’s dead body on ground.)
 
GVO: But just being a loser, not such a good thing.
 
(Gordon, the ghost at the wedding, is regretting his dying without a boyfriend, and he asks George whether it’s possible to find someone on the other side – for him on the other side of his lights.  And we have her express her predicament that has her pushing and testing boundaries on her other side – for her on the other side of death, but short of crossing over into those lights.)
 
George: You’re not alone.
Gordon: I died without a boyfriend. I don’t suppose there’s a chance of getting one on the other side, is there?
Ge: That’s a good question, Gordon.
Go: What’s the answer?
Ge: I’m still trying to figure it out myself.  But for now, I’m here for you.
 
(And in a set-up for the next scene telling us a reaper’s duty to escort their reaps to their lights is important or is it telling something about Daisy’s predicament?: )
 
GVO: Nobody should have to face death alone.
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(34) (Daisy is sitting at the Waffle Haus counter, by herself, and in the background some syrupy string music is being played, which really annoys her.  Enter Roxy who is p*ssed that she pulled this Mason sh*t – leaving her reap unescorted confused and alone.)
 
Roxy: You are some kind of f*&k-up.  This is some Mason sh*t.
Daisy: I don’t know what you’re talking about.
R: You leave the soul and you finger the murder?
D: I did nothing of the kind.
R: You left the man’s name.
D: No, I didn’t.
R: I know your handwriting Daisy – your silly little curlicues.  What the f&*k do you think you’re doing?
D: I just didn’t want him to get away with it, OK?
R: That is not your job.  Your job is to handle that woman’s soul.
D: Everybody has something they don’t deal with, Roxy.  Rube doesn’t do kids. I don’t do those.
R: Those what?
D: Women who end up …..that way.  Defenseless, with a man coming at them.  I can’t watch it.
R: That never happened to you
D: I didn’t say it happened to me.
R: Then what the hell are you feeling so guilty about?
D: I just feel guilty.  Can’t a girl feel guilty?
R: Maybe you need to go back to church.
D: Maybe we’re done talking about this.
 
(They pause.  Daisy takes a drink from her coffee cup.)
 
R: Doesn’t that f*&k with your sleep?
D: I’m up anyway.

Kiffany: (approaches) Can I get you anything?
R: Coffee.
 
(We can see the two sitting together at the counter both drinking coffee.
 
And whether she drinks coffee or not she can’t sleep?  So why did Daisy react so badly to this particular murder? We really don’t find out but she clearly is very sensitive to this situation with a man coming at a defenseless woman.  In passing we hear something possibly important with regard to Rube.  Of our reaper gang we know the least about Rube’s death.  For some reason Rube’s sensitivity is reaping kids.  We know he obtained a gun from flashbacks, and he used it to earn his own wanted poster.  Could he have somehow caused the death of an innocent child on the way to getting his face plastered on that wanted poster?) 
 
GVO: The cool thing about being a reaper was you kind of had a second chance to make things right.

 
(The scene ends with a shift to a montage of shots/views tied together with George’s voiceover commentary.  We see George after finishing her wedding reap – she has returned to the memorial service, but as she comes down the stairs it’s clear there’s no one else there but the clean up crew.)
 
GVO: Another whack at the piñata.  See if I could get the thing to break open. I don’t know.  Maybe the party was already over.
 
(35) (At Clancy’s love den, we see Reggie asleep with Clancy hard at work crafting a one page heart with a quote he is writing out.)
 
GVO: Maybe the lights went out and I just couldn’t see it.
 
(Joy is just finishing up her own heart model.
 
And then back to Clancy placing a blanket over the sleeping Reggie.)
 
GVO: I don’t know.  Being dead I could handle.  Being totally alone was something else.
 
(And then, we see George returning to her own house – empty it seems at first – and she takes her shoes off.)
 
GVO: Being alone was too much.  Or, it was too much today.
 
(George enters the living room to see a disheveled Trip waiting for her.)
 
George: Oh my God!
Trip: Hi.
G: Who – who told you where…?
T: Your friend, Mason.
 
(Trip returns one of the two earrings that Mason took from George when she left the memorial service.)

 
GVO: Check it out. Dead Cinderella!
 
(And nature takes it course.)
 
GVO: I wasn’t ready for my death and it came anyway.  And I wasn’t ready for this but here it came anyway.  Like something…I don’t know, falling on me … out of the sky.  It was pretty nice to have someone track me down for once.  To think someone cared that I was gone.
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(38) (And holding that last voiceover thought we transition to Mason making a grand entrance into the Waffle Haus, where he finds Daisy at the counter feeling very much alone and looking emotionally distraught and needing someone to care a little about her.)
 
Mason: What is this vision of loveliness I see before me? Nymph? Angel?
Daisy: Not tonight.      You’re wearing golf shoes.
M: Shut up! No way! Is that what they are? Bloody hell!  They are very smart aren’t they? Lovely.
I have had the most incredible day.  It’s been booze.  It’s been food.  It’s been petty larceny.  It’s been absolutely f*&king fantastic.  I wish you’d been there.  I missed you.
D: It’s nice.
M: Kiffany, can I interest you in a very very good deal on a very nice gold watch?
Uh, how about a nice fashionable clutch bag?
Kiffany: No.  You can’t wear golf shoes in here.
M: Why not?
K: It f*&ks up the floors.
M: OK.
K: Do you want some more coffee, Hon?
D: (head shake – no) I’m done.  Thanks. (Kiffany leaves)
M: She hates me.
D: No, she’s had a long day and so have I.
M: What’s wrong?
D: Nothing (smiles).
M: Really? I’ve got something for you as well, Daisy Adair.

Ta da (Mason pulls out the little Shi Tsu’s diamond studded dog collar.
D: Wow.  A girl’s best friend.
M: Stolen from man’s best friend, 
D: A dog?  
M: A very wealthy dog.  I thought it might be too small to wear around your neck so you can wear it as a bracelet.
Here, let me help you.
D: I love it.
M: I love you….loving it…love.
D: Did I ever tell you I had a sister?
M: No.   Do….Why don’t you tell me all about it?

Kiffany, please, could I have a coffee?
K: One coffee.
 
(And here we get another view of a vulnerable Daisy and maybe some insight into what makes her tick – something to do with that sister, which she’s about to tell Mason all about, but we don’t get to hear.  Very likely another arc intended for more next season and never completed.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(39) (Clancy returns Reggie home and we get to hear the poem he wrote as part of his heart model:)
 
Joy reads: 
“Since sweets and beauties do themselves forsake
And die as fast as they see others grow;
And nothing ‘gainst time’s scythe can make defense 
Save breed, to brave him when he takes thee hence.”
 
Reggie: What does that mean?
J: Shakespeare.  It means, uh…It means you should have kids.  Because then you’re never alone.
 
(They then notice the dog has chewed up the heart model Joy made the night before, but.. it still works.
 
This poem has wisdom for the living, but for a reaper it points to a dead end – a very real boundary – they cannot form relationships that produce children.  They may get a second chance as George says in an overview, but there are very real limitations.  This will be brought up again in a later episode by Daisy when she refuses his offer of a ring.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(42) (The morning after at the reaper abode with George waking up in bed alone.)
 
GVO: Ok, I didn’t hate it, but it was weird.  I hadn’t exactly been close to anyone in a while…OK ever.
And suddenly someone had gotten very close.  And then they disappeared.

 
(Things look up   - for a moment as Trip appears with coffee for both, but then he signals he’s not looking for a continuation, bringing things down.)
 
GVO: I think I know why people use that stupid phrase ‘Doing it’ because it’s so f*&king hard to talk about.
 
There we were, and one of those bubbles you blow as a kid, kind of round and perfect and just a little strange floating in the air.

 
Trip: So this was fun.
 
GVO: And there it goes.   Pop!
 
(She drinks some of the coffee and it’s HOT!)
 
GVO: Oh my f*&king God that’s hot!
 
(Given coffee’s role to carry a little symbolism thru-out the episode – here it means George just got burned with her first venture beyond virgin territory.)
 
GVO: So maybe I was a virgin when it came to the sex thing. But he was a virgin, too.  First big death.  And you never really know what death will make you do.
 
How you try to defy it.

 
(Here we get a view of Rube packing for his research trip holding a picture of his wife and daughter.  Or Rube reaching past what’s possible even tho the pieces of his life and his 80 year old past are way too broken to ever likely be able to fit together again.  But if there’s a chance his daughter is alive?  Then what?)
 
To reach past what’s possible.
 
How you struggle to fit the pieces together even tho they’re way too broken to bother.

 
(We see Reggie showing her broken Joy made heart model to her class that morning as she reads the poem written out by Clancy.)
 
I don’t know.
 
(And that morning George is leading CPR training on the dummy at Happy Time.)
 
I do know that morning I felt that my heart, or whatever it was in my chest, was still going.
 
(George succeeds in bringing the dummy back to life.
 
In the end George is still plugging away.  These last few scenes tell us a few things about boundaries vs the living and a little bit more about Rube.  One is that a reaper can in fact have a liaison with one of the living without upper management issuing a cease and desist order so we know the boundary extends that far, but not how far it could go.  George clearly is disappointed that it didn’t go farther and longer, but she doesn’t know where it is either.  So Daisy’s stories have at least some support.  A second gets slipped in and can easily go unnoticed and that’s the photo Rube holds for us to see before he packs it to go on his trip.  It’s a cherished photo of we suppose his wife and daughter.  Now as Rube explained to George not so long before all a reaper gets to keep are memories.  George pushed those boundaries and stole a few photos from the Lass house (and picked at least one up at her gravestone – left by Reggie.)  How did Rube come by this photo?  He had to obtain it after he died?  At his gravestone?  Not likely, but…..?    Or did he somehow remove it when he paid an unauthorized visit to wherever his wife and daughter were living?  In any case with the voice over we can conclude that Rube some 80 years late is trying to test the boundaries of what’s possible – to reach past it and attempt to find his daughter and put some pieces of that life back together.
 
Finally, George’s voiceover comment “First big death.  And you never really know what death will make you do.  How you try to defy it.”  This shows us once again how George and Rube seem to move in parallel in their different time tracts.  Both  - George we see and Rube we just get hints of – end up in their own ways defying death to test boundaries during their second chances or lives as reapers.)


Dead Like Me Resurrection pending

#53 Danioton

Danioton

    Viper Pilot

  • Full Members
  • Pip
  • 103 posts

Posted 08 July 2013 - 09:42 PM

Ep 210 Death Defying
 
“ Losing your virginity is supposed to be one of the steps towards being really alive
For me, it was one of the ways I finally realized that it was over.
 
You can’t undo what you’ve done.
 
Some things you can’t change.
You can’t un-spill water, even if you want to.
 
Some choices you can learn to live with right through to the clear light of morning.
They say coming clean is good for the soul.
That it puts things in perspective.
 
You can get a sense of your place in the order of things.
A sense of who you really are, and what’s important.
 
This is my perspective.
 
I am a Grim Reaper.
I take souls.
I do not go to Prom.
I do not live happily ever after.
 
This is who I am.”  - Georgia Lass
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
 
In this episode, the main up front story concerns George’s emotional struggle with Trip’s not calling her after her ‘first time’, which leads her to a deeper more grounded perspective on her undead existence – a retreat and attitude adjustment from the earlier attempts to take back some of the life she had lost by dying so young.  As much as she wants to be a part of the living surrounding her she’s had some understanding of her limits as a Grim Reaper forced upon her.  This episode signals an end or closure on that primary arc initiated by Fuller and underpinning much of our story so far.
 
The Lass family is struggling with the separation.  On the whole Joy is further along than Clancy who is realizing his own predicament now that Charlotte has dumped him.  Joy has found the perfect gentlemen in Angelo.  And both Reggie and Joy seem to be adjusting to the absent George signaling a major transitioning on the second primary arc of our story.
 
The third major arc – George, Rube, and Reggie – is moved forward nicely with Rube’s leaping out of his compartmentalized existence.  Rube goes off to some remote town to research old records with a young man’s, Joey, help. And his research allows us to learn several details, which are shown to us.  We learn that his daughter’s full name is Rose Anne Sofer.  She was born March 19, 1925 (later corrected to 1922).  Her father, 49, Rube John Sofer is in sales, and her mother, 24, Lucy Sonia Debrouski, is from Czechoslovakia.  They lived at 243 Georgian Lane in Englewood, NJ. The birth year – 1925 - was later corrected to 1922 in the final episode on her tombstone because the girl we’re shown in one of Rube’s flashbacks looks to be about 5 years of age – certainly not 2 - but Rube died early enough in 1927 to reap Betty in 1927 in a S1 episode and send the cash envelope in November.   
 
This episode also begins a fascinating exploration of Daisy and Ray Summers.  Ray is not a perfect gentlemen and he makes an odd contrast to Joy’s Angelo.  Daisy is attracted to him from the first, but the deal got sealed when she found out he’s a TV producer – probably more than a few inside jokes here.  For all Daisy’s talk of sexual liaisons from S1 and S2 we’ve not really been shown much concrete evidence of anything.  Ray is very concrete both for us and Mason who is thrown really off balance by Ray and the threat he represents to Mason’s own earnest endeavors to get something going with Daisy.
 
An anomaly pops up in connection with the wanted poster (for bank robbery) showing Rube’s current face. Joey notices the resemblance immediately.  The same mistake was made with Betty’s picture that George took as Betty jumped out of the series.  
 
As nice a touch as the wanted poster is on one level it represents an anomaly within the DLM universe.  We the audience and other reapers see Rube’s original appearance – as it appeared in life because we’re seeing his original soul – but the living can’t see ghosts or souls so they see the appearance constructed for them and visible to them and to any recording devices, which also can’t see ghosts – as was introduced way back in the pilot.  
 
(Note: There’s an amusing and understated reference to this problem in the pilot when at the DMV the two reapers – the guy who’s making the fake ID documents and taking George’s picture and Rube – discuss George’s (Millie’s) eye color for the driver’s license.  As reapers they see George (as we do) and she has brown eyes, but they have no way of knowing what her eye color is to the living until they take a color photo and look at it.  As it was, they guessed – blue.  This twist is taken one step further in the new movie ‘RIPD’ in which the two dead cops look different to the living – one old guy looks like a young very hot blonde while his young white sidekick looks like an old Chinese guy.)
 
The only time the living can see the original soul is an exception not yet introduced – in the last episode of S2 and then only on Halloween and the day after and then again only for the living who knew the reaper when they were alive.  All the reapers in the Waffle Haus look the same to Kiffany on Halloween as on every other day.
 
In any case the problem here is that if the drawing were made before Rube died it would show his original soul’s appearance as he looked when alive, but in that case Joey couldn’t make the connection with the undead reaper in front of him – Rube wouldn’t match the drawing since Joey would be looking at the post death appearance constructed for the living.  If the poster were made by the living after Rube died then it would not have Rube’s living appearance, but the undead reaper one created for the living.  We get a brief glimpse of the poster and it looks like Rube’s reaper appearance and not as he would look to the living.  
 
If we were shown a drawing of a man we’ve never seen (Note: In pilot we only got to see the doubles for Mason and George, and then later in S1 we often saw George’s double, but we never saw those for Roxy, Betty, Daisy, or Rube) this would for sure cause confusion and while with some extra dialogue and voiceover it might be done, I suspect the writers just finessed it.  
 
It does mess up what could be a valuable clue regarding Rube’s backstory.  We tend to assume that Rube committed the bank robbery generating the wanted poster and then later died, but it’s possible the poster was made after he died i.e. when he was a reaper.  That would mean that Rube committed a bank robbery after he was a reaper, which seems unlikely and definitely runs counter to the whole staying on the fringe theme and is for sure a level of crime for a reaper above what we’ve seen in the series.
 
Note: In reviewing older episodes I noticed that in several Rube makes a point of showing his open wallet with a prominent photo visible  – a very old photo – of a woman likely to be his wife.  The point made for an earlier episode that the framed photo he possessed of his wife and daughter could only be obtained after he died – probably not unlike George obtained her framed photos of family – also applies to that wallet photo.  And since they go to the trouble to show it often it was likely a set up for something later.
 
Note: The next episode –Ashes to Ashes - represents another major shift in the plotting and arcs as the 3rd major theme – Reggie/Rube/George – looks to get renovations to close out the series with S2.

Dead Like Me Resurrection pending

#54 Danioton

Danioton

    Viper Pilot

  • Full Members
  • Pip
  • 103 posts

Posted 08 July 2013 - 09:50 PM

Ep 210 Death Defying (continued)
 
 
(1) (Opens with a Georgia Voice Over talking over a scene with young Georgia holding onto a kite with younger happier Joy and Clancy standing behind her.  )
 
Georgia Voice Over: When I was a kid my parents would tell me to hold onto things tightly – a kite, a balloon – whatever – to not let go.  But I was scared that if I held on too tightly…. to something or someone…. I’d be carried away.
 
(Shift to George hiding outside Trip’s club.)
 
GVO: Except I’m always the one telling people it’s over…..time to move on.  That’s what grim reapers do.
 
(And a security guard escorts George away.)
 
GVO: And now I’m crouching in the bushes outside a b*llsh*t country club hoping to get a look at the boy I can’t let go of.  What the f*&k?
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(1) (George enters the Waffle Haus and wherever she looks she sees couples in love.)
 
GVO: He disappeared.  He didn’t call. It was my first time. What an a*sh*le! Really all I wanted to do was tell somebody what had happened – tell them what I had become.
 
(George sits down to the booth with Daisy and Mason smiling at each other and warmly talking – clearly that talk they had in the last episode has opened up new possibilities.  Mason is completely absorbed in Daisy’s words (and face and body…) even when George announces that she’s a stalker.
 
Roxy shows up in police uniform and with Rube’s postit book.
 
Mason finally asks how that Trip thing went.)
 
GVO: We slept together and then he blew me off.
 
George: Not my type.
Roxy: Ya. He’s alive.
 
(She gives out the day’s reaps together with new paperwork they are to fill out summarizing their reaps.  
 
Roxy even calls George ‘Peanut’ and George rejects it.
 
After George departs we see Mason and Daisy having some fun at Roxy’s expense.  Roxy warns them against having secrets and when Mason asks where Rube is Roxy responds – ‘He has secrets.’ )
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(4) (We see Rube entering his research destination – a small town city records office judging by the foot traffic and facilities, but we’re not told where.  The sole working employee is a young kid playing a video game on the office computer – Joey we learn – who greets Rube.  Rube is at first put off when he learns the records were digitalized and merged into a larger national database defeating his whole purpose in traveling to this office.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(6) (Lass house where Joy and Reggie are having breakfast when a hunk of a delivery guy comes with groceries.  Joy leaves to get cash and Reggie shows us how she tries to use George’s death in easing her interactions.  She fabricates a story of George being murdered in the living room, which seems to ensure the guy declines to come back – her possible goal.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(9) (George enters Happy Time where unsurprisingly wherever she looks she sees mating behavior, and when she talks to Delores – it’s about her fading success rate attracting men.)
 
GVO: There’s never a cop around when you need one.  And by the same logic when a girl finally has one secret truly worth sharing there’s never a single person around to listen.
 
(And we meet Crystal’s boyfriend.)
 
GVO: I couldn’t tell Delores.  That would be like telling parent.  And there are some lines you just don’t cross.
 
(George sits down in front of Delores to talk and the conversation quickly turns to sex, men, jousting, cats, etc.  We learn here Delores’ views on men which parallel Ray’s explanations to George later in the episode.)
 
Delores: I’m meeting a new friend tonight at the Ren Fair. And maybe you think watching jousting all night doesn’t mean anything.  I’m telling you men have one thing and only one thing on the brain. 
George: Jousting?
D: They’re primal creatures, these, these…..men!
G: They’re awful aren’t they?
D: But they’re cute and they can’t cook, and we just can’t help ourselves.
 
(George exits with another Dr’s appointment excuse.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(11) (Joy is talking on the phone to Clancy who is not cooperating with arranging for visitation with Reggie.  She finally gets Clancy to pick Reggie up early because she’s secretly preparing for a date.  Reggie tells Joy about the break up of Clancy and Charlotte.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(12) (George and Mason are on a parking structure rooftop for the reap of some daredevil who jumps to his death off the top.)
 
GVO: Most people know that death is coming and most people refrain from seeking it out.  Some people are different.
 
Some people have no comprehension that death can be so close.
 
(Note that after the guy dives to his death he immediately appears next to his reaper, George, who then loudly berates him for his foolishness, and she demonstrates by hitting him hard that for her the ghost has a physical substance.  )
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(15) (Rube is attempting to decipher the computer to get his information, and he types in ‘Lucy Sofer’ but finds all the Lucy Sofers -12,473 - in the national database with no way for him to narrow it down.  Rube explains that sometimes less is more and Joey tells him about the boxes of old records in the basement.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(16) (Clancy has come to pick up Reggie and sees clues of Joy’s impending date, which leads him to concoct an emergency and cancel the visit with Reggie until tomorrow.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(19) (Daisy goes to a country theme bar for a reap  - Buddy, the guy who bursts into flames – and meets Ray, the TV producer – and the courtship begins.  Daisy’s reap is death by spontaneous combustion – a first for Daisy.
 
Ray sees her and attempts a pick up, which Daisy deflects – at first.
 
Talking to Buddy, Daisy lets us hear a little of her country accent.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(22) (At the Lass house Joy is preparing for her date to show up as she endures Reggie’s questions.  Joy’s plan was to tell Angelo the date was called off when he shows up, but, being a gentleman in all aspects, he says he’s just fine with bringing Reggie along.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(23) (At the records office Rube and Joey are going thru old paper records.  Joey finds Rose Anne Sofer’s birth certificate.  Lots of information is shown to us here some of which might have been part of one or more set ups for future episodes/seasons.  
 
Rube’s middle name is John and in 1925 he was 49 years old – occupation ‘Sales’.  His wife, Lucy Sonia Debrouski, was only 24 and born in in Czechoslovakia.  Their home address is given as 243 Georgian Lane in Englewood, NJ and Rose’s birthdate as July 19, 1925.  This year was later corrected in the final episode on her tombstone (changed to 1922) because the girl we’re shown in one of Rube’s flashbacks looks to be about 5 years of age – certainly not 2 -  but Rube died early enough in 1927 to reap Betty in 1927 in an early S1 episode and send the cash envelope in November.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(24) (Ray/Daisy courtship continues at the bar.  Daisy’s holding out.  Ray mentions that death doesn’t scare him. When George and Mason appear Daisy leaves Ray, who unlike Angelo will not be a gentleman in all aspects.
 
George and Mason show up with George primed for heavy drinking.  Ray decides to go over and introduce himself to the trio.  George does not like Ray because he’s a man – ‘F*ck you, Ray’.  Mason also does not like Ray because he’s a man interested in Daisy, which is nothing new, but for her obvious interest in him.  Daisy’s interest doesn’t really get seriously sparked until in the introductions Ray explains he’s a TV producer.  George is nominated to voice a certain flavor of resentment among some strata in the community  - ‘So you’re rich’ – towards certain other participants in the entertainment industry.)
 
Mason: What’s that smell?  It smells like buffalo wings.
Daisy: Ya. That’s Buddy.  He got burned.
George: Good.  One less man in the world.
 
Ray: Hi.  I’m Ray.
G: F*ck you, Ray.
R: Nice spending time with you guys.
 
(Daisy stops him from leaving and introduces all around.)
 
G: So what do you do, Ray?
R: I’m a television producer, George.
G: So you’re rich.
R: Comfortable.
G: I suppose you’re charming.
R: Tolerable.
G: And women just fall the f*ck all over you.
R: Not you, I suspect.
D: Georgia, you’re being impolite.
R: No, no, it’s OK.  Everybody likes me eventually.
 
(Mason comes seriously undone by Ray and Daisy takes him aside for a talking to, and he immediately falls back on his concern for George’s behavior.  Daisy won’t hear of it and later she and Mason talk things over apart while we get George and Ray throwing darts together.  Daisy says that George is a big girl and in any case she’s a dead girl.  Mason confesses to Daisy how upset he is to see her ‘with another man’.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(28) (Joy, Angelo, and Reggie at the park – the same park – probably filmed on the same day if not at the same time – as the one in the opening scene.  Reggie like young George allows the kite to drop to the ground.  Soon the scene reverts to the scene with young George dropping the kite.)
 
GVO: That’s the thing about kites. You have to hold on tight so they can fight against the wind.
 
Because the second you let go – all the life goes out of them.
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(30) (We return to the bar and the two couples talking.  To one side Mason and Daisy, and at the dart board George and Ray.  Ray attempts to get information on Daisy from George and we get this revealing little exchange.)
 
Ray: (looking over at Mason and Daisy talking intensely) What’s that all about.
George: Probably you.
R: I find your friend, Daisy, painfully attractive.
G: Take a number.
R: How do you know her?
G: That’s none of your f*&king business.
R: You’re an angry little thing, aren’t you?
G: You call me a ‘little thing’ again and I’m putting this f&^king thing between your twinkling eyes.
R: Another Tequila?
G: Please.
 
G: So you the ‘love ‘em and leave ‘em’ type?
R: I’ve done that.
G: What is up with that?
R: What’s the matter George? Some boy not nice to you?
G: No, I’m good.
R: I’ll bet you are.  Macy, two more.
 
R: OK, George.  Five reasons men are scum, and women let us get away with it.
One, we only want one thing.  No exceptions.
Two, we fall in love with you before we can have that thing, and then fall back out once we’ve had it, whereas women conversely fall in love afterwards.
Three, we will lie, cheat, steal, or murder in order to get that thing– why am I sugar coating this – you’re a big girl – in order to f&*k you.
Four, we freely admit to numbers one thru three and women don’t care.
And the number five reason men are scum and women let us get a way with it.  You can’t live without us.
G: Here’s to your b*llsh&t, Ray.
F*&kin, men.
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(31) (At the Lass house Angelo has left the room to retrieve a surprise and Joy and Reggie are discussing what it could be.  And it’s the drawing now framed he made of Joy at his apartment in an earlier episode.  Reggie remarks it looks just like Joy, sad.) 
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(32) (At the bar Mason and Ray are playing pool.  Mason is winning and taking Ray’s money.  Ray offers to back off on Daisy on Mason’s say so.  Mason declines probably due to his earlier conversation with Daisy in which she made things painfully clear for him – they’re just friends.  When three guys attempt to push them off the table, Ray shows us his dark side.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(34) (Rube at the records office is working thru boxes of documents.)
 
GVO: Death isn’t like holding onto a kite…. or a boy…..or most anything else, because sometimes, even if you wanna let go, it won’t let you.
 
(Joey brings up what he says is the last box.  He sees Rube focused on one document and asks what it is.)
 
Joey: What do you got there?
Rube: Death certificate.
J: Whose?
R: The mother.
J: Well, everyone’s gotta die, right?
R: Ya, that’s right.
 
(That last box has the daughter’s name on it.  As Joey moves the box the weak bottom drops thru to the floor and as he collects the fallen papers he finds an old wanted poster that has a drawing of a man wanted for bank robbery with Rube’s reaper appearance (vs the one he shows the living e.g. to Joey), which is also the way he looked in life.  Rube takes it folding it up saying it’s a souvenir.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(35) (At the bar Daisy drags George into a singing duo, which doesn’t end well.  Daisy and Ray end up together – Daisy got hooked by the TV producer thing – Daisy is going to have her way with Ray until after Ray get what he wants.  Mason follows George out the bar.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(37) (Mason counsels George as best he can just outside the bar.  George laments that she lost her virginity only after she died.  She puts a brick thru a store window but neglects to run resulting in her arrest and detention a holding cell.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(38) (George meets the cheerleaders in the jail holding cell.  Roxy refuses to spring her.)
 
GVO: If you’re young and not so innocent … I mean it’s your first time in the slammer, you call your Mom she knows exactly what to say.
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(40) (Joy is making some headway with Angelo when they knock over George’s picture.  Angelo asks about George but Joy is more interested in him and the moment – clearly she’s gotten over George.  Angelo soon excuses himself and leaves.  Joy does not have her way with Angelo. 
 
Joy makes a point very clearly when she says ‘You’re a really good man, Angelo’.  She goes on to say he doesn’t have to be so careful with her.  Joy vs George vs Daisy comparison   - George got hurt.  Daisy will get hurt.  Joy wants to get closer to get some hurt, but is the most balanced of the three.  Angelo leaves saying ‘I’ll call ya’ and we believe he will and then Joy looks at the picture of George, who suffered not getting the call back from Trip.  George didn’t get called and in a future episode Ray doesn’t call Daisy.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(42) (At the jail Delores shows up wearing a medieval costume having interrupted her date at the jousting performance and shows an odd familiarity with the paperwork involved with getting out of jail – she knows the form number!
 
Delores asks whether this was her first time (as in jail) and George answers yes and he didn’t call.  Delores is really acting as a mother stand in here (as opposed to Roxy) helping George thru this tough time counseling her both on the jail and the bad first time experience with Trip.)
 
GVO: Losing your virginity is supposed to be one of the steps towards being really alive.  For me it was one of ways that I finally realized that it was over.
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(43) (Linked by the voiceover we shift to seeing Rube unpacking his suitcase.)
 
You can’t undo what you’ve done.
 
(Mason at the bar playing pool by himself.)
 
Some things you can’t change.  You can’t un-spill water, even if you want to.
 
(Daisy and Ray in a car (!) wrapping up the night.)
 
Some things you can learn to live with….right thru to the clear light of morning.
 
(George in her Happy Time cubicle is approached by Delores who gives her a reassuring pat on the shoulder and George responds with a smile  - strong bond between these two.)
 
They say coming clean is good for the soul, that it puts things in perspective.
 
(Reggie is putting the couch pillows back into order at home.)
 
That you can get a sense of your place in the order of things.
 
(Joy the morning after looking at her reflection in the bedroom mirror.)
 
A sense of who you really are….and what’s important.
 
(We return to young George’s red kite and see its string break followed by young George contemplating its falling.)
 
This is my perspective.
 
(We see Roxy and Rube at the Waffle Haus booth.  Roxy smiles – all is well – as she gets up to leave replaced by George at the booth across from Rube.  She sits down and Rube hands her a postit and then he leaves.  George sits back alone and shows a newly formed attitude towards her personal fate.)
 
I am a Grim Reaper.
I take souls.
I do not go to Prom.
I do not live happily ever after.
 
This is who I am.
Anyone got a problem with that?
 
(And with this episode we get closure on the first of the primary three themes in the two season DLM story – George’s problems and frustrations deriving from her coming to terms with her own death.  Here with these lines of voiceover she’s telling us that her loss of virginity triggered the realization that for her life was over and that she has found some perspective – found a sense of her place in the order of things –who she is and what’s important.  So what is this new perspective? – she’s a Grim Reaper taking souls and she will never get to live happily ever after.  This gets echoed by Daisy in a later episode when Mason offers the engagement ring.
 
We also saw that Joy and Reggie have made significant progress in getting over George’s death – a partial leaning toward closure on the second main theme – the family’s reaction to George’s death.  Until the picture got knocked over George wasn’t mentioned and once it was, Joy carried on with life.)

Dead Like Me Resurrection pending

#55 Danioton

Danioton

    Viper Pilot

  • Full Members
  • Pip
  • 103 posts

Posted 15 August 2013 - 07:44 PM

Ep 211 Ashes To Ashes
 
 
“I’m going to hell.  Or maybe I’m staying here forever.”  - Georgia Lass
 
“You’re so beautiful..
And I love you..
I just don’t like you anymore”  - Mason (to Daisy)
 
“From the moment I met him, 
I knew something about Arthur Simms was familiar.
I understood wanting to disappear.  
I wanted to my whole life.  And then I did.”  - Georgia Lass
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
 
This episode stands out more for what it lacks (and why that might be) than for what it contains.  The title line arc involves George reaping a homeless man and her conflict over whether to get pulled into paying his cremation costs using windfall money or use it to buy a ‘hot new leather jacket’.   Reggie meets a Goth girl at school and starts developing some new friends until Joy gets offended at Reggie’s using George’s manner of death to advance things with her new friends.  The story that really holds our attention is the second installment of the Ray and Daisy arc.  The acting job Ray offers Daisy is seducing a ‘boy scout’ of a husband on camera in a bar setting for a reality show he produces.  The husband, Walter, was nominated to be the star – without his knowledge or consent – by his suspicious wife.  Mason – after seeing Daisy at work - is not happy with Ray or Daisy, and delivers the harsh lines quoted above to her at the Waffle Haus booth. 
 
This story of a homeless man who dies without family is tied in with George’s short life by the concluding voiceover:
 
From the moment I met him, I knew something about Arthur Simms was familiar.
I understood wanting to disappear.  I wanted to my whole life.  And then I did.
 
This contrast suffers a bit because the old man disappears voluntarily or seems to, since we don’t really learn anything about him, and George dropped out of her life more on a draft basis. 
 
What’s lacking in this episode is anything advancing the main themes.  As to why that might be let’s look at who wrote what during S1 and up to this episode and after for S2.
 
Season 1
1 –Pilot------------------Written: Fuller
2 –Dead Girl Walking------------ Fuller  
3 – Curious George--------------- Ocko  
4 - Reapercussions -------------- Fesman & Victor 
5 – Reaping Havoc -------------- Philbin 
6 – My Room--------------------- Victor & Fesman 
7 – Reaper Madness------------- Spezialy 
8 – A Cook ----------------------- Masius & Godchaux
9 – Sunday Mornings------------- Ocko
10 – Business Unfinished-------- Fesman & Victor & Philbin
11 – The Bicycle Thief---------- Lieberstein
12 - Nighthawks --------------- Godchaux & Carpenter
13 - Vacation-------------------- Ocko
14 – Rest In Peace ------------- Masius & Godchaux
 
It’s surprising that Fuller only wrote the first two episodes.  I think it likely that he left some outlines of intended arcs and themes for the new showrunner, Godchaux.  And at a minimum as the show got underway he would have discussed with his writing staff the major themes, characters, and how they all would develop.  And then the question becomes just how far did he think this ahead? 
 
The writing credits are scattered among several people with Godchaux, Ocko, and Masius the most prominent. 
 
Season 2
1 - Send in the Clown--------Story: Masius & Godchaux -----Teleplay: Godchaux
2 - The Ledger---------------Written: Godchaux & Carpenter  
3 - Ghost Story --------------Written: Godchaux & Weisman  
4 - The Shallow End --------Written: Godchaux & Gajdusek 
5 - Hurry --------------------Written: Godchaux & Carpenter 
6 - In Escrow---------------Written: Godchaux & Weisman 
7 - Rites of Passage--------Written: Godchaux & Gajdusek 
8 - The Escape Artist-------Written: Carpenter
9 - Be Still My Heart-------Written: Weisman
10 - Death Defying---------Written: Gajdusek
11 - Ashes to Ashes---------Written: Mansour & Miller
12 - Forget me Not --------Story: Masius & Godchaux-----Teleplay: Godchaux & Carpenter
13 - Last Call---------------Story: Masius & Godchaux -----Teleplay: Godchaux & Weisman
14 - Always ---------------Story: Masius & Godchaux -----Teleplay: Godchaux & Gajdusek
15 - Haunted --------------Written: Masius & Godchaux
 
In S2 we see only one writer, Carpenter, returning, otherwise Godchaux and Masius dominate assisted by Carpenter, Weisman and Gajdusek.  The exception is our current episode, ‘Ashes to Ashes’, which is by Mansour and Miller, who drop in for this one episode.  After ‘Ashes to Ashes’ Godchaux and Masius take control – complete control.
 
My guess is that sometime before this episode Godchaux and likely Masius came to believe that there would be no third season.   They used the base story line -  ‘Ashes to Ashes’ – without any of the major theme adornments while they reconfigured the main themes/arcs in the last four episodes to take into account the more likely than not possibility the series would be ended with episode 15  - ‘Haunted’.
 
I don’t mean to imply that everything is brought to a satisfactory conclusion by the final scenes of ‘Haunted’ because the typical viewer is left feeling like a great story just got truncated – that these characters had a lot of story that was being left unfinished.  However, there are numerous indications in those last four episodes that G&M attempted to accelerate certain characters’ growth and likely abbreviated several arcs, but at the end by that last scene when George decides to walk away from her mother and sister at her gravesite they were trying to find a compromise that would give some closure to the audience while leaving things open enough for a future season.

Dead Like Me Resurrection pending

#56 Danioton

Danioton

    Viper Pilot

  • Full Members
  • Pip
  • 103 posts

Posted 15 August 2013 - 07:52 PM

Ep 211 Ashes To Ashes (continued)
 
(1) (Reggie is sitting in front of the Lass house fireplace looking over George’s high school yearbook.)
 
GVO: Some people you just never forget.  It’s like they get burned into your brain.
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(1) (Homeless refuge under a railroad bridge -  George accompanied by Roxy has come looking for her reap – A. Simms – and time is running out.)
 
GVO: Other people make no impression at all.
It’s like they’re there…. and then they’re not.
 
(George guesses correctly at the very last moment.  George is bothered by the fact that Simms will go into the morgue as a John Doe.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(4) (Reggie’s class is in the gym getting their class picture taken.  Reggie  - probably taking inspiration from George’s example the night before in her yearbook – refuses to smile.  When a new Goth classmate mentions her dead sister the class stops smiling and Reggie starts.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(5) (At the Waffle Haus the reaper gang is discussing dead derelicts as in Howard Hughes.  When he died 400 people claimed to be his heirs and a lucky few got to split up his fortune.  This example inspires Mason to push George to go to the morgue posing as one of Mr. Simms’ long lost relatives to see if there might not be some gain.  Mason is for the money while George is conflicted.
 
The conversation led by Mason quickly turns to Rube’s research trip – last episode - and what Rube was up to, which Rube wants to avoid talking about.  Rube gets angry and leaves.)
 
Mason: George. You need to learn about the John Does of this world.
George: Forget it.  I have to work today and Millie has used up all her excuses.
M: Then tell Millie to get her *ss down to the morgue during her lunchtime like normal working people.
Daisy: I actually have to work today myself.  Doing what I was meant to do.
Roxy: Hooker?
G: (laughs)
D: I’m acting.  On a TV show.
R: Are you sleeping with the producer?
D: That’s between me and him.
R: I hope so.
G: So, are you?
Are you sleeping with Ray?
D: George, I’m not the kind of girl who likes to kiss and tell.
G: Since when?
D: Since now.
M: I’d love to see you act, Daisy.
D: Then you should come down.  Ray would love to see you.
M: I will.
D: You too, George.
G: I’m not interested.
Didn’t care for Ray much.
M: Ya, Ray is an *ssh&le isn’t he?
 
(Mason then makes a great pitch about the poor John Doe that works on George.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(8) (George and Mason show up at the morgue pretending to be siblings and relatives of the deceased uncle.  Mason falls crying over a Black corpse using a heavy fake sounding Southern accent – the wrong corpse it turns out.  He repeats the accent and breaks into an emotional outburst again for the second and also wrong corpse.  Suddenly he drops the accent returning to his normal Brit accent for the third one who turns our to be the pauper – Arthur Simms.
 
Mason refers to his sister, Millie, as George and the morgue attendant asks whether she’s Millie Hagen or not.)
 
GVO: It’s not my job to say who lives and dies.  And it sure as sh*t isn’t my job to give anybody a little dignity when they do.  
My job sucks.
 
(George decides to write in A. Simms name on his toe tag, but then the attendant returns calling out Ms. Hagen, which George doesn’t at first respond to, with a $400 bill for the burial costs.
 
She then decides she’s not related and scratches out the name.)
 
GVO: Aww, now I get it.  Generosity is for people who can afford it.
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(12) (Young George not following thru on her impulse to sell 100 boxes of girl scout cookies, which she sticks her mother with selling.)
 
GVO: I should have seen this coming.  I was always good on initial impulse. I never earned any badges for follow thru.
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(13) (Daisy is getting introduced to her acting job in back of a bar where she will seduce a married man on camera to provide evidence for his suspicious wife no doubt triggering a divorce.  
 
When Daisy shows less enthusiasm than Ray wants to see  - she wants to ‘get out of this dump’ – Ray calls her bluff and threatens to pull everything down and come later with another girl.  Daisy surrenders.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(15) (At Happy Time George tries to warm up to Crystal.  Waiting for her in the conference room is ‘Mickey’ who runs the local homeless shelter and who is here to shame ‘Millie’ for not taking care of her ‘Uncle Authur’.  He hands over Arthur’s ‘stuff’ and tests just how close she was to him, a test, which she fails.)
 
Mickey: These…These are Montana’s belongings.
George: Wow..I was wondering where his stuff went.  Thank you, Mickey.
M: You’re welcome.
G: So you knew ….Uncle Authur?
M: Ah,…a little bit.  I certainly didn’t know he had any family.
G: Well, we weren’t a close-knit crew.
M: You know. I always wondered why he called himself ‘Montana’.
G: I think Montana loved the outdoors.  He was a ‘Big Sky’ kinda guy, ya know?
I know he loved a good barbecue.
M: You didn’t know him at all, did you?
G: We were planning to get together.  We had…..scheduling….issues.
M: I always wonder how my clients end up where they do, on the fringes, ya know?  And then I run into some family member who doesn’t give two *****, and that’s it.  Mystery solved.
G: I give a ****.     Not two.
M: Ah, is that why the county’s taking care of him?
G: I just don’t have 400 bucks laying around.
M: Ya, and since you left him to charity his whole life, why change now?
I am so sick of you people.  Shame on you.
G: A little heads up on the dead, Mickey.  Put’em in a marble temple….stick’em in a coffee can…either way they don’t care.  They’re dead.
 
GVO: I’m going to hell.  Or maybe I’m staying here forever.
 
(Delores shows up and soon a check is being cut for 400 bucks – family emergency.)
 
Delores: I didn’t know you cared so much.
 
GVO: Neither did I.
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(18) (At the Lass house Reggie returns home with the Goth girl, who doesn’t appreciate JD – a preppy dog.  Her real name is Sandy Simmons – now known as ‘Raven’.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(20) (Rube is out on the streets for the reap of a kid who paints graffiti.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(22) (Daisy is starting to understand what her acting position entails – particularly that she is tricking a guy on camera to fall for her, cheat on his wife, and end his marriage.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(23) (The new Goth Reggie – Spider - and Raven are looking over George’s last high school yearbook.  Joy brings up snacks and that turns into a pizza dinner invitation.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(24) (Daisy’s natural inclination is to push the guy – Walter - back towards going home to his wife.   The guy initially declines to go forward and Daisy seems willing to let him go.  Ray gets p*ssed and forces an attitude adjustment Daisy  - he probably gets paid more – a lot more – if he delivers evidence of infidelity.  And Daisy goes back out and pushes Walter, the boy scout, in a direction he probably wouldn’t go down on his own.  Daisy does the deed for Ray.)
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(27) (Delores hands George the 400 dollar check.)
 
GVO: The good news was I had a check for 400 bucks.  The bad news was I was thinking about keeping the money.
 
Delores: This is a sweet thing you’re doing, working overtime to pay him tribute.
George: That’s what we do for family, I guess.
 
GVO: I was working for it, so why should I spend it on some guy just because he’s dead?  I’m dead, too.
 
D: Honoring the dead, helps us go on living.
G: I know.
 
GVO: One hot leather jacket and no one would be the wiser.
 
D: The thing that’s lovely about this gesture is that you’re not just looking for a pat on the back.
 
GVO: On my hot new leather jacket.
 
G: Right.
D: That’s the way I feel about my kids.
G: What kids?
D: The little ones I sponsor.
 
(And then Delores parades a series of pictures of little kids in extreme poverty overseas.  Notice that Mickey’s shaming attempts would have been insufficient.  But for Delores and her little kids George would have that hot new leather jacket.)
 
D: Fifteen dollars a month from yours truly gets her a monthly supply of high protein lunches and her village gets a water pump.
G: That’s so sweet, Delores.
D: Ah, I mean she’ll never thank me in person, but that’s not what’s important, as you know.
G: Right.
D: The important thing is when life presents us with an opportunity to help someone who can’t help themselves we have to step up.  And that’s what you’re doing right now.
 
GVO: And just like that I lost my hot new leather jacket.
 
D: Thank you for the fine example you set.
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(29) (While Daisy is out at the restroom Ray seals the deal with the target - Walter.  Mason shows up and Ray makes sure Mason stays out of it.  Daisy does the deed – the guy agrees to meet her at a local hotel.  And we get Daisy’s numbered view of what guy’s want.)
 
Daisy: You know what everybody says on their deathbed, Walter?
They wish they’d had more fun.
And men wish they’d had more women.
Five reasons men come to a bar, Walter.
One, they don’t love their wife anymore.
Two, their wife doesn’t love them.
Three, they wanna see what they’re missing.
Four, they want, if just for a moment, to taste it.
Five, -  (She kisses him)
Maybe there were just four.
Do you want to go somewhere with me, Walter?
Walter: I do.
D: Blackstone Hotel.  Get us a room. I’ll follow.
 
(Ray grabs Daisy’s arm tightly  - enough to hurt – because he says he’s jealous for the long lingering kiss she gave Walter.  Ray says he’ll meet her later (i.e. he’ll call later) and leaves. Mason then tells her off - ‘whore’ he calls her.  Then Walter’s wife introduces herself and has her say – she seems more inclined to blame her than Walter.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(34) (The little Goth party is going strong with a game on death.  Joy is dressed up as a Goth herself.  Clancy shows up downstairs.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(36) (George shows up at the morgue with her 400 bucks and gets the guy’s ashes to go.  The morgue guy has his own frog, too.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(38) (Joy gets invited into the death game  - thinking of gruesome ways to die.  Things proceed happily until Reggie steps over a boundary that Joy can’t tolerate  - she describes George’s death  - by a toilet seat falling from the sky.  Joy cancels the party and kicks everyone out.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(40) (At the Waffle Haus George has Arthur’s ashes on the booth table.  Roxy shows up and then Kiffany asks whether they’re people ashes – not allowed on tables.  George denies it.)
 
George: He woke up this morning life-size  - now look at him. No headstone.  No nothing.
Roxy: You don’t need a headstone if nobody’s gonna come to see it.
(Daisy sits down next to George.)
Daisy: Are those ashes?
G: Yes
D: I was cremated you know.
R: You burned to death.
D: That’s what I just said.
G: Gone with the wind……on ‘Gone With The Wind’.
(George and especially Roxy laugh hard.)
D: I didn’t find that funny.
G: I did.
R: How’d your big day go?
D: Perfect.  I nailed every scene.
(Mason sits down next to Roxy.)
R: Really?
D: Apparently I’m a very gifted actress. 
R: Really?
D: Ask Mason.  He was there.
Mason: What’s that?
G: Arthur Simms.
M: Who’s that?
G: Uncle Arthur.
M: Uncle Arthur!  You’ve lost weight. Cheers (to Arthur).  Cheers (to Roxy). Cheers (to George).  (And then Mason looks at Daisy and does not give her ‘cheers’.  Daisy has started to fix her face – make up touching up.)
G: So, Mason.  Was Daisy a good actress.
M: Yes she is.
D: Thank you. 
M: Always has been it turns out.  My eyes have been opened.  My ears have heard that which they thought they never would.
D: All right, Mason.
R: Well, little Miss Movie Star.
We finally got someone that’s somebody.  
D: Yes I am.
R: And that somebody should pick up the check.
G: Uh, Roxy.  Can you do me one more big favor?
R: I’m not going anywhere with that dead man.  It’s a health code violation.
G: Circle of Life, right?
R: OK, but you have to go on my shift with me.  And he sits in the back seat.
G: That’s fine.
Congratulations, Daisy.
 
(Roxy and George leave.  Mason, who moved to let Roxy out, is leaning over the back of the booth glaring at Daisy  - he has something to say.  Daisy sits back down and starts fidgeting with her make-up again. )
 
M: You keep doing that you know?
D: Doing what?
M: Fixing your face.
D: Well, a girl has got to look good for her man.
M: That man grabbed you by the arm, Daisy.
I don’t think I care for him much.
D: No, what you don’t care for is that he’s dating me.
I’d really appreciate it if you’d be civilized when he shows up.
M: He’s coming here?
D: Yep.  Of course.
M: Rube wouldn’t like that.
D: You’re right.  Rube wouldn’t like that, but he’s not here, and you still are.
 
(And Mason delivers a one two painful punch.)
 
M: You’re so beautiful..
And I love you..
I just don’t like you anymore
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(43) (George’s voice over with a view of the sky at dawn opens.)
 
GVO: In a lifetime we get to be many things.  Rich man, poor man, beggar man, thief, doctor, lawyer, Indian chief, daughter, sister, scout, college dropout, friend, dead girl.
 
(We see JD excluded from Reggie’s room where she’s playing with matches.)
 
Or maybe we just play the parts for a couple of hours until the curtain falls.
 
(Daisy has waited for Ray all night.  She’s been stood up by Ray – he didn’t call.)
 
From the moment I met him, I knew something about Arthur Simms was familiar.
 
(After dawn Roxy and George are at the shore of the homeless encampment where Simms died and where they will scatter his ashes.)
 
I understood wanting to disappear.  I wanted to my whole life.  And then I did.
 
(George and Roxy walk away and talking ostensibly about breakfast.)
 
G: Maybe I’ll try something different today.
R: You should.   It’s a big menu.

Dead Like Me Resurrection pending

#57 Danioton

Danioton

    Viper Pilot

  • Full Members
  • Pip
  • 103 posts

Posted 25 August 2013 - 09:10 AM

Ep 212 Forget Me Not
 
“Nina couldn’t move on because she couldn’t remember, but most of us are haunted by the things we can’t forget.”   - Georgia Lass
 
“I guess Death makes everything grow cold.
I hadn’t been thinking about Reggie at all lately,
Or my Mom….or my Dad.
I hadn’t been thinking about them at all.
And, I bet they weren’t thinking about me.
Either way, my afterlife was a secret.
Anything else was just too dangerous.”   - Georgia Lass
 
“There are things inside you that no one wants to face.
Things that you keep secret, even from yourself.
But secrets are funny.
Things that you try to hide always turn out to be the things you can’t forget.”  - Georgia Lass
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
 
This is the first of the final set of four episodes – all written by Godchaux and Masius – and these probably should be viewed as an integrated whole rather than stand-alone episodes.
 
This one – Forget Me Not - spends a lot of time finishing up with the Daisy / Ray sub arc – at least the part of that arc with Ray living and breathing.  Later, Daisy and Mason will still have to hide what they’ve done and Ray becomes a graveling – Rayling – with an agenda – revenge on Daisy and Mason, not in that order.  Daisy and Mason can’t forget Ray and Rayling won’t forget them.
 
Daisy has been reckless with Ray and Rube hears about it.  His interrogation of Daisy and then George communicates to the audience that liaisons between the living and reapers are not acceptable, altho why it is so dangerous is left ambiguous.  And Daisy’s fling with Ray helps develop the odd relationship evolving between Daisy and Mason.  Even as Ray seems to win vs Mason he’s losing and gets dumped by Daisy.
 
George reaps an old woman whose memories are gone which does two things.  It sets up a contrast –what can’t be remembered and then what can’t be forgotten.  And then the reap itself allows us to meet Penny – an old reaper friend of Rube’s who gives him (and us) his daughter’s current location.
 
Joy decides to return to the workforce and goes to see Delores at Happy Time unsettling some secrets that will threaten to escape into the light in a future episode – secrets George would prefer to stay hidden.
 
George in her voiceover pushes towards a partial closure in her afterlife non-relationship with her family.  Neither side can forget the other, but both are learning to move beyond the scar left by her sudden death.  George’s final voiceover comment also seems to point towards secrets Rube would like to forget. 
 
 
The second primary theme moves towards some closure - the scar left by George’s sudden death on both her and her family.  With time both sides learn to live or exist around and further away from the frightful event.  George’s voiceover while she pauses in her car just outside her house:
 
“I guess Death makes everything grow cold.
I hadn’t been thinking about Reggie at all lately,
Or my Mom….or my Dad.
I hadn’t been thinking about them at all.
And, I bet they weren’t thinking about me.
Either way, my afterlife was a secret.
Anything else was just too dangerous.” 
 
The sentiments of the first five lines are very close to those expressed in the ‘The Lovely Bones’ as the young girl in her layered Heaven and her family adjust to her death and move on.  What’s different tho derives from the very original aspect of Fuller’s having his dead girl physically existing among the living – this idea that her afterlife must be kept a secret because of some undetailed dangerous consequences – those last two lines.   My guess is that this dangerous aspect would have been shown to us in the next season with the elaboration of Rube’s backstory.  He did something before he sent the cash that he greatly regrets and would like to forget.  Rube has those secrets that we never get to learn about.  In this abbreviated version to end the 2nd season that just wasn’t an option given time constraints, so it’s hinted at and then left more hanging than not, with the option to return if there had been that next season.
 
The danger threat has two prongs.  The first, just mentioned, about getting too close to living family, and the other concerns these liaisons between the living and reapers.  We hear in this episode from both Mason and Rube.  Mason is somewhat biased but now we have these two voices in this episode saying that relationships with the living are  - for reasons not made really clear – strongly frowned upon.  The consequences don’t rise to the level of the Memory Erase Rule which automatically removes a reaper’s memory when they try to reveal their former living identity to someone they knew when alive.  Whatever the danger or threat might be it’s contingent and delayed – i.e. the PTB didn’t stop Mason (with the music store clerk), George (with Trip), or Daisy (with Ray) in the act itself – but there’s something – a possible consequence - that can happen that causes Rube to speak strongly against it to George, Mason to warn Daisy, Daisy to warn George, George to hide her brief fling with Trip from Rube, and Daisy to deny her connection with Ray even as she behaves recklessly.
 
From Rube’s interrogations we get some confirmation regarding the truth behind those alleged dalliances between Daisy and the living.  Daisy the most prominent self-proclaimed practitioner of the hobby has often talked about these matters but there was enough ambiguity that the audience could suspect she was a exaggerating a bit (or lot).  Here Rube seems to be telling us that the stories are true, but he tells George these forbidden acts did not occur under his supervision and he clearly would not knowingly permit such things. 
 
The Nina arc with George is a nice contrast with all the secrets that can’t be forgotten.  Poor Nina can’t remember who she is much less any secrets she might have had and therefore can’t go into her lights.
 
“Nina couldn’t move on because she couldn’t remember, but most of us are haunted by the things we can’t forget.”   
 
But the focus is on keeping secrets – both the inside and outside kinds - and how they have a way of coming out into the light in unexpected ways.
 
“There are things inside you that no one wants to face.
Things that you keep secret, even from yourself.
But secrets are funny.
Things that you try to hide always turn out to be the things you can’t forget.”  
 
There are plenty of secrets in this episode.  The obvious one concerns the murder of Ray that Daisy and Mason need to bury in the back yard.  But Ray tells us about – just before he meets his end – his insights into Daisy that she keeps hidden from others, and perhaps herself, too.  Then we have Rube interrogating first Daisy and then George about Ray.  George isn’t likely to snitch on Daisy for very highly principled reasons but also perhaps because she would like to keep her secret regarding Trip quiet.  Rube has lots of secrets of his own.  We know a bit about the daughter – a research project of his - that he’s managed to keep away from his reaper gang including his ever loyal Roxy, but that starts to slip with Penny who wants to know why he wants the information on this patient at a nearby facility.  
 
The relationship between Mason and Daisy is growing and evolving in odd twists, and their murder of Ray adds a measure of bonding drawing them together in a dysfunctional sort of way.  However, even before the murder at the end of the episode even as Ray seemed to win in every confrontation with Mason for Daisy’s affections, there are several hints firmly planted in how Daisy interacts with Mason that show her deeper conflicted feelings for Mason.  At a few places even as she puts him down or he stumbles badly in one way or another she gives him revealing side-glances.  And it’s Ray beating the ***** out of Mason that finally triggers her dumping Ray – shown as clear as possible when she gives Ray the finger, which really upsets Ray and leads to his confronting them at their reaper house and his death. 
 

In the scene towards the end in which Ray’s soul emerges from his body as a graveling note how Mason is upset that there’s no soul (and maybe the fact he killed Ray, too), but that Daisy is intently watching the corpse. Afterward Mason notices that Daisy seemed to know what was going to happen and tells us that Daisy has seen this before (just to make sure we get it).  Daisy admits this and connects it to her ‘bad luck’.  More twists left unexplained and hanging that perhaps would have had some elaboration later.

 

George’s reap of Nina sets up two important episode events.  The first is an understated demonstration maybe of what awaits a reaper who gets too close to family in any way that would persistently trigger the auto Memory Loss Rule – i.e. why George can’t allow Reggie to get close.
 
The more important and stand out event is we get to meet Penny – an old member of Rube’s Waffle Haus gang – who gives him the location of his daughter Rosie – she’s living in some sort of old folks’ home, but not the one Penny is working in.  Penny we will learn is even older than Rube – she died on the Titanic in 1912 – and she has some words of wisdom for Georgia, who confides to Rube and later Penny that she doesn’t like old people.  Penny points out that as a reaper she will never age.  
 
Penny’s area of reaping is called ‘Natural Causes’ in a long term care facility and Rube explains to George it’s one of the nicer assignments – the rooms are numbered and the reaps all have nametags.  Penny died on the Titanic – not a natural cause - and was assigned to the same group as Rube, but she was moved to her current reap specialty.  So we learn reapers can shift, but the how and why of it is left untouched.
 
Penny writes the info for Rosie on a postit, which she gives to Rube, but not before interrogating him as she suspects he’s up to something as a reaper he should not be doing.  So we get another clear message that reapers’ contact with former living relatives is not acceptable.
 
Penny: So who is this Rosie?
Rube: Ah, nobody you know.
P: Is it somebody you knew?  Is she related to you?
 
(Penny sees the look on Rube’s face at the question)
 
Is she related to you?
R: Yes.
 
(Penny hands Rube a postit with information she’s written on it.)
 
Beau Chene. Is it a decent hospital – they take good care of people there?
P: No, Rube, they water them once a week.
Look at you.  Driving on the wrong side of the road.  It’s not good.
 
Rube takes the postit and we’re shown him placing it inside his wallet on top of the small photo of his wife (assumed).  We’ve been shown this very same wallet photo a few times in prior episodes and it’s deliberate and its implications easily overlooked.  We know George got her family photos in two ways – one she burgled them from her house while her family was out, or Reggie left them at her tombstone.  Again, how Rube came by the two we know he possesses – the wallet photo and the framed one of his wife and daughter - is something we likely would have learned from a next season flashback. 
 
We get a look at the name on the postit: Rosie Schnee
 
The last name is not Sofer, which might explain all the trouble Rube had in finding her.  It also implies she married since Schnee is not Lucy’s last name – Debrouski - before marrying Rube.  This was a likely set–up for a longer arc involving Rube and his family if there had been a third season – for Rube’s grandchildren??  As it was we got the much-abbreviated version with Rube seeing his daughter just before she died.  And all we got to see was that last very brief meeting.  However, note that Rube got this information from Penny well before Rosie’s passing.  Did he go to meet her?  If he did, how did he work around the obstacles  - e.g. memory loss issue – that we know he already is well aware of?  Rosie recognizes him before she died.  How did she know him in his reaper form – the one shown to all living?  Did she know him from 1927? Or because he visited her at Beau Chene after getting this postit?

Dead Like Me Resurrection pending

#58 Danioton

Danioton

    Viper Pilot

  • Full Members
  • Pip
  • 103 posts

Posted 25 August 2013 - 09:41 AM

Ep 212 Forget Me Not (continued)
 
 
(1) (Young George reading ‘A Tale of Two Cities’ in the kitchen and refusing Joy’s pleas to go to a birthday party.  Georgia early anti-social tendencies show thru again, which either as an effect of or cause of young George found refuge in reading books – a solitary activity.)
 
GVO: When I was little, my Father, who was an English teacher, used to tell me that I would never be alone as long as I had a good book.  Good thing.
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(2) (Mason and George at a spelling bee for a reap, where again adult George shows off her smarts via her spelling skills.  The nerd who likes Reggie is the top competitor.)
 
GVO: Reading didn’t make me popular, and reading didn’t necessarily make me happy.  What it did make me was a really good speller.
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(4) (At the Waffle Haus, Rube and Daisy are discussing rumors of boyfriends – in particular her boyfriend.  All the talk talk about Daisy’s activities and here we get some concrete expression defining permitted boundaries at least as per Rube.)
 
Rube: I hear you have a boyfriend.
Daisy: Who did you hear that from?
R: Doesn’t matter who I heard it from.  Is it true?
D: No.
R: Fine.  So you don’t have a boyfriend who’s living and breathing and has no idea that you’re a grim reaper?
D: Did Roxy tell you that?
R: Tell me what?
D: That I have a boyfriend.
 
(And now we know why Kiffany is here.)
 
Kiffany: That handsome devil I saw you leaving with last night?  Is that your boyfriend?
D: No!
K: OK.
 
(Mason and George sit down.)
 
R: How’d it go?
 
(They review the reap at the spelling bee which has Mason annoyingly spelling or trying to spell words instead of speaking.  Rube hands Daisy a postit reap at a gym and suggests Mason go with her for protection.  Daisy at first demurs but when Rube implies that she will be accompanied by her boyfriend she relents and grudgingly invites Mason along.  Daisy and Mason depart leaving Rube to interrogate George on the alleged boyfriend, whom Rube obviously disapproves of.  Notice Roxy is nowhere to be seen – she has a personal day.)
 
R: Tell me about her boyfriend.
G: Ah, Kiffany.
I haven’t met him.
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(6) (Joy places blueberry pancakes in front of Reggie, which sets off alarms because she says Joy only makes them when she feels guilty.  It turns out Joy is going to Happy Time to look for a job.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(7) (And the interrogation resumes at the Waffle Haus as Rube tries to extract information on Daisy’s alleged boyfriend.  We get some clarification – finally- on the those boundaries – at least as Rube sees them.)
 
Rube: Daisy has alleged in the past that she has had dalliances with men, sexual escapades with people who were alive while she was reaper.  If so, it’s a blunder.
 
(George names several celebrities Daisy has fingered as partners in her escapades.)
 
R: The point, George, is that uh…these alleged indiscretions…they were not on my watch.
George: I am not a snitch, Rube.  I am not telling on Daisy.
 
(George has her own indiscretion that needs to be protected spelled T-R-I-P.  Anyway, Rube seems to admit that Daisy may have done what she says, but he does not approve of such behavior under his charge.  Leeway is defined into the canon here.  It’s frowned on.  The fact she’s done it does not bring down punishment, but it’s not allowed openly.)
 
R: Snitching is not the point.  The point is that she should not be involved with someone living.
The point is  - keep the syrup away from the eggs.
G: I like syrup on my eggs.
R: Who’s that?
G: Who’s who?
R: This.
Ray: George, right?
Ya, Daisy told me this was one of her haunts.
Hey, Ray Summers (reaches to shake hands with Rube.)
Rube: Rube.
Ray: Quite the death grip you got there, Rube.
(to George) You seen my girl?
G: Oh, she just left.
Ray: Ah, so much for timing.
Rube: What’s your story, Ray?
Ray: My story is that I’m a television producer.
You may have seen my program.  It’s……
Rube: I don’t watch that much television.
Ray: Let me guess.  You’re a reader.
G: I’m a reader.
Rube: How do you know Daisy, Ray?
Ray: Met her in a bar.  Bought her a drink….or three.  We may have been a little over served that night.
Rube: So you’re just drinking buddies?
Ray: No, no, no.  Daisie’s my…my good luck charm.
Rube: Charm perhaps.  Good luck….not in my experience.
Ray: Well, maybe not in your experience but…. Actually, come to think of it.  The night I met her some guy died.
(to George) You were there.
G: No, I wasn’t.
(looking at Rube) I wasn’t. 
 
 
Ray: So how do you know Daisy, Rube?
Rube: That’s not any of your business.
Ray: Wow, don’t candy coat for me, Rube, if I’m not welcome here….
Rube: You’re not welcome here.
Ray: Did I say something to offend you?
Rube: No.
Ray: Then what’s your problem?
Rube: I just don’t like strangers all that much.  And I did not invite you to sit down at this table with people you do not know.
Ray: Actually, Rube, I know George here.
G: You don’t know me.
 
Ray: (chuckles) OK….you folks have a nice day. (Ray leaves)
 
Rube: I do not like him.
G: Don’t you just want to slap that smile right off his face?
 
(Ray is not Angelo.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(10) (At the boxing gym Daisy and Mason are looking for her reap – and discussing Ray.  Mason, that paragon of common sense, is pointing out to Daisy it’s not a good idea to invite Ray to the site of her reap.  Mason notices Daisy’s admiration for the boxers.)
 
Mason: Ya, I really don’t think it’s a good idea for you to invite Ray to a reap.
Daisy: Oh ya, so suddenly you’re the responsible one.
M: Come on.  It’s reckless. He might see something.
D: Please.  He doesn’t notice anything.  He’s blinded by love.
 
(Daisy is so desperate for someone to love her – particularly a someone connected to the movie/TV industry – that she’s blinded.)
 
M: (laughs/scoffs) You are flirting with disaster, Daisy Adair.
 
(Mason is somewhat biased but now we have two voices in this episode  - Rube’s and now Mason’s – saying that relationships with the living are  - for reasons not made really clear – strongly frowned upon.  They don’t rise to the level of the Memory Erase Rule which automatically removes a reaper’s memory when they try to reveal their former living identity to someone they knew when alive – i.e. the PTB didn’t stop Mason ( with the music store clerk), George (with Trip), or Daisy (with Ray) in the act itself – but there’s something – a possible consequence -  that can happen that causes Rube to speak strongly against it to George, George to hide her brief fling from Rube, and Daisy to deny her connection with Ray even as she behaves recklessly.)
 
D: You just don’t like it that I’m flirting at all.
M: Come on!   I’m not interested in you …..that way anymore.  Actually.  Really.  Anymore.
D: I believe you.
M: Good.
(Daisy’s side glance at Mason reveals her relish at his pursuit and her real feelings for him?)
I just don’t want to see you get hurt.
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(11) (Joy is sitting in the reception area at Happy Time to interview with Delores.  Crystal is staring at her – persistently – which starts to annoy Joy. )
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(12) (Rube and George are at an old folks home/hospital for George’s reap of the old lady (Nina) who can’t remember anything  - the one who overdoses on pills earning her a reaper from Rube’s group instead of one from the natural causes group.  The PTB assign reaps to reapers and in this case a very young George is being put in among a lot of old people – something she doesn’t like – she tells Rube she doesn’t like old people – and she gets to meet Penny – Rube’s old friend and former member of the Waffle Haus reaper gang.  Penny’s area of reaping is called ‘Natural Causes’ and Rube explains to George it’s one of the nicer assignments – the rooms are numbered and the reaps all have nametags.  Penny died on the Titanic – not a natural cause -  and was assigned to the same group as Rube, but she was moved to another type of reap specialty.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(14) (George finds her reap – Nina Rommey – a woman suffering from severe memory loss.  This subarc seems to be an understated comment, if not a direct warning to George (and for sure the audience), on what lies ahead for her if she ever seriously attempts to communicate with anyone from her former life  -  an empty shell or a ghost of former personality with all her key memories removed.)
 
GVO: Like I said.  They freak me out a little.
 
(Penny comes by Nina’s room on her rounds.  After a little banter, Nina babbles something about a fairy tale she’s looking forward to hearing.)
 
George: (a bit sardonically about Nina while looking over to Penny) Well, once upon a time, you were alive and then you died.  The End.
Penny: Oh, hey, I know you.  You’re the one who was killed by a toilet seat.
G: God, will anyone ever let that go? Blah, blah, blah, blah…..
P: I’m Penny.
G: I’m George.
P: Nina, this is George.  She’s come to take care of you.
Nina: We have to go.  We really don’t want to be late.
G: (glancing at her watch) Oh, we won’t be.
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(15) (At the gym Daisy is talking about boxing and boring the sh*t out of Mason.  Her motor mouth runs down (to Mason’s relief) and she decides to go find her reap before Ray arrives.  Again Daisy looks longingly at a young boxer and this inspires Mason to try boxing to impress Daisy.  In his daydreaming he almost hits Ray who has shown up early. Soon they’re in a confrontation and Mason unwisely maneuvers him into a match.  In another part of the gym Daisy finds her reap and does the deed.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(19) (Nina with George leaves her room, finds unattended pills and takes enough to ensure she dies.)
 
GVO: I’d seen a lot of people die.  Hit by a bus, mauled by a bear….torn up by a lawnmower, but this quiet mistake I couldn’t make sense of.  
Then again neither could Nina.
I know I wasn’t supposed to interfere, but I just wanted to stop her before it was too late.
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(20) (At the gym, Mason is finding that Ray has some skill at boxing.  Daisy is enjoying the two fighting over her, and she on the side tells Ray to take it easy on Mason.  Daisy and Mason clarify that tho reapers heal fast they get all the pain.  Daisy moves over to Ray and when he wants to kiss her she says not in front of Mason perhaps a hint as to where her true feelings lie.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(21) (Joy is still waiting at Happy Time.  The girl, Fiona, who George mentored last season pops in to sit next to Joy.  She mistakes Joy for someone else, and when she learns the truth remarks how brave – at her age – Joy is for re-entering the work force.  Finally, Delores shows up.  As Joy walks past George’s cubicle she gets some sort of a feeling and looks at it pondering the nature and source.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(22) (Ray is getting the better of Mason.  Daisy finally has enough and walks off disgusted – she can only take so much of Mason getting hurt and Ray’s attitude towards inflicting the hurt.  Ray is offended when she walks off giving him the finger as she leaves.  Ray takes his anger out on Mason.  This ends the Ray and Daisy funfest.  In another part of gym, Daisy’s reap finally dies and she escorts him off.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(24) (George is with Nina in her room where she is about to die.  Nina’s thoughts drift back to the 8th grade.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(25) (Delores is interviewing Joy who it turns out has a broad skillset.  In the process Delores realizes that Joy is George’s mother bringing the interview to an emotional tearful pause.  They discuss George and her attributes before getting back to the interview.  Joy reveals she likes making lists and labeling boxes – a set up for her self-employment to come in a later season?)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(27) (Reggie, at the school library, discovers a book – George signed the old check out card inside the cover - that George read several years before.  This is the same one we saw in the opening for the episode.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(28) (George is having trouble getting the soul of Nina to understand she’s dead or even remember who she is, which is preventing her from finding her lights.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(29) (A key scene between Rube and Penny.  Rube is asking for information about his daughter, Rose, and Penny wants to know why he wants to know.)
 
Penny: So who is this Rosie?
Rube: Ah, nobody you know.
P: Is it somebody you knew?  Is she related to you?
(Penny sees the look on Rube’s face at the question)
Is she related to you?
R: Yes.
(Penny hands Rube a postit with information she’s written on it.)
Beau Chene. Is it a decent hospital – they take good care of people there?
P: No, Rube, they water them once a week.
Look at you.  Driving on the wrong side of the road.  It’s not good.
 
(From Penny’s attitude we know Rube is doing something he’s not supposed to do.  Also, Rube places the postit on top of the very old picture in the wallet of his wife?  How and when did he come by this picture?
 
We get a brief look at the writing on the postit:
 
Rosie Schnee
Beau Chene
Rm 222
 
The last name is not Sofer, which might explain the trouble Rube had in finding her.  It also implies she married since Schnee is not Lucy’s last name before marrying Rube – which was Debrouski.  This was a likely set–up for a longer arc involving Rube and his family if there had been a third season – for Rube’s grandchildren??  As it was we got the much-abbreviated version with Rube seeing his daughter just before she died for that last very brief meeting.  However, note that Rube got this information from Penny well before Rosie’s passing.  Did he go to meet her?  If he did, how did he work around the obstacles  - e.g. memory loss issue – that we know he already is well aware of?  Rosie recognizes him before she died.  How did she know him in his reaper form – the one shown to all living?  Did she know him from 1927? Or because he visited her at Beau Chene after getting this postit? 
 
Business out of the way, Penny turns the conversation to her old acquaintances at the Waffle Haus and we get a peek into Rube’s view of George.)
 
P: How’s der Waffle Haus?
R: Good.
P: Kiffany?
R: Fine.
P: Your merry band of reapers?
R: They’re awful. (enter George)
George: OK, you have to help me.
R: She’s one of the better ones.
G: Better one what?
R: What’s the problem, George?
G: I can’t get her to go.  She won’t follow me.
P: Nina forgets things.
G: Ya, I picked up on that.
R: What Penny is saying is that she has no idea she’s dead.
G: I get that.  How do I get her to go?
R: I’m telling you, George, you have to get Nina to connect to her own death before she can move on.
G: How the f*&k am I supposed to do that?
P: Ohh, she’s got a mouth on her.
R: Always a pleasure Penny.  I’ll see you around the campus.
G: Are you kidding me?  You’re just bolting? 
R: I got fish to fry, little Georgia.
P: (George looks at Penny) Hey, I’m on my lunch break.
G: Aww come on, please?
P: Sorry Honey.  Can’t do it.
G: Come on.  I don’t…….  I don’t really like old people.
P: Then you’re one lucky girl.
G: How so?
P: Because you’ll never be one.
 
(Not clear what Penny means here by ‘Can’t do it.’ Because it’s clearly demonstrated many times in the two seasons that while the specific reap assignments are from above Rube, any reaper can escort any soul to their lights.  Nina’s been reaped and is dead and just needs a little encouragement.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(31) (George reluctantly heads back toward Nina’s confused soul still stuck in her room.)
 
GVO: I would never become old.  Dead and young has to be better than alive and old.  Isn’t it? Right? At least I remember things.
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(31) (Joy is hard at work reorganizing her cupboards and pantry and Reggie wonders what’s going on.  Joy only immerses herself in labeling when something bad happens.  Claire shows up with JD who has been disturbing her nasturtiums.  Claire notices the reorganizing and impressed asks Joy to do her pantry and agrees to pay for it.  A new home business is born.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(33) (Mason and Daisy have found their way to Nina’s room and with George they help stimulate Nina’s memory thru a little play acting.)
 
GVO: How do you explain to someone what death is?  What do I say?  Death is like …. What?  It’s like a play, right?  The swan song? The last act? The fat lady singing?  That’s what it is, the final curtain.
 
How do I tell someone who doesn’t understand that the show’s over?
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(35) (Reggie pulls from her knapsack the book that young George had borrowed from the library and finds written inside a cryptic reference about herself.)
 
GVO: How do I tell someone who doesn’t quite understand the words that it’s OK to leave?
 
(George wrote in reference to her sister:
 
“Reggie needs to disappear”
 
Thru a flashback we see George reading the book while watching both parents dote over baby Reggie.  She suddenly announces, “I don’t want Reggie to die.”  And then writes the above.
 
Present day Reggie doesn’t know what to make of the words.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(37) (George, Daisy, and Mason are at a loss that Nina is still among them. )
 
GVO: Nina couldn’t move on because she couldn’t remember, but most of us are haunted by the things we can’t forget.
 
(Mason and then Daisy decide they’ve had enough and leave. Mason says he needs a drink and Daisy says she can’t let him drink alone.  Left alone with Nina, George decides to tell Nina George’s own story of when she died and that triggers something in Nina and she goes into her lights.)
 
GVO: I didn’t know Nina’s story.  I could only tell her mine.  It was the only story I really knew.
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(41) (George in her red mustang pauses outside her old house.  Perhaps a signal of the approaching end of the primary theme regarding her concern for her family as George comes to terms with her own death and the need to let go of her family - to move on?)
 
GVO: I guess Death makes everything grow cold.
I hadn’t been thinking about Reggie at all lately,
Or my Mom….or my Dad.
I hadn’t been thinking about them at all.
 
And, I bet they weren’t thinking about me.
 
Either way, my afterlife was a secret.
Anything else was just too dangerous.
 
(And why is it dangerous and what is she thinking about in particular?  In any case this is a nice set-up telling us how far she’s comes towards allowing the acceptance of her fate – her death – to settle down in some sort of peace, and because of her acceptance the rationale for her decision in the final scene in the cemetery to walk away.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(41) (Mason and Daisy got very drunk together and singing merrily they reenter their reaper house to find Ray waiting for them.  Ray has noticed that at each place he meets Daisy somebody dies.  Ray is not happy at Daisy’s dumping him and assaults her.  Mason in her defense hits him repeatedly with a tray killing him – or more accurately he hit him once in defense of Daisy and the rest could be construed as murder.  Ray died without a postit i.e. unscheduled, and out of his body emerges a graveling – or Ray’s soul becomes a graveling.   This freaks Mason out completely, but Daisy says she’s seen this before.  What was the factor(s) that made Ray a graveling?  Not clear.  
 
Ray goes over the repeated correlation between Daisy and somebody dying. Perhaps his noticing something he’s not supposed to know removes some sort of auto protection restricting the living to dying ‘with a postit’ i.e. only when scheduled. )
 
Ray: You left the gym without saying goodbye.
Daisy: I’m sorry.
Goodbye.
Mason: I think you should p*ss off.
R: I think you should stay out of this, Ginger.
 
Somebody die at the hospital?
D: No.
R: Somebody died at the gym today.  But then…….you knew that.  And the night we met.  And two days ago.
I’m beginning to think you’re bad luck.
D: Ya, I am.
R: Ya. 
Ya, that’s what your friend Rube told me this morning.
M: You……met Rube?
R: Uh huh.
He wasn’t very nice to me.
Then again……none of you has been very nice to me.
D: You really should leave now.
 
R: OK.  I’ll go.
D: And don’t come back.  I’m done with you.
R: Good for you.  I think you’re right to end it.
 
(And here is where things take a physical turn with Ray taking Daisy by the throat and putting her against the wall.)
 
R: Just one thing Sweetie.  You don’t end things.  I end them.
You don’t tell me you’re done.  I do.
You’re worse than bad luck.  You’re a black f&*king hole.
D: F&*k you!
R: You’re not as genteel as you look, Daisy.
As pretty as you are, I just can’t shake the feeling that you’re really just a cheap hillbilly piece of tail.
 
(And Mason rises to defend Daisy bashing Ray – without a postit – until he is dead.  Ray’s heart felt words may be offering some insight into Daisy – something she’s hiding from others and from herself.)
 
D: He’s dead.
M: He’s dead.  I kil….I kil……
I’m sorry.
D: I’m not.
 
M: There’s…..Darling, there’s no postit.
And there’s no f*&king soul.  There’s no f&*king…...
 
Is there a shovel in here?
There’s got to be a shovel, hasn’t there?  Is there? Eh?
 
(We can see in this brief pause that Daisy is intently watching the corpse while Mason’s attention is already diverted by shovel concerns.
 
And we get the graveling coming out of Ray’s body.  
Daisy and Mason kinda lose it here, but murder is such a positive bonding experience to share.  The practical side of Daisy immediately starts encouraging Mason to keep this a secret and it comes out that she’s seen this before something Mason has picked up on too.  All of this raises questions about how and when people die without postits and produce gravelings?  About Daisy’s background that she’s seen this before?)
 
M: This is all my fault, man.
It’s my f*&king fault.
It’s my fault.
It’s my fault.
It’s not your fault.  And you’re in it now.  You’re in it now.  
D: No, stop it.
M: You are in it now.
D: It’s nobody’s fault.
Uh, and it’s done.
All right?
M: Ya.
D: We keep this to ourselves, and no one needs to know.
M: What the f*&k was that?
How the f*&k did you know that was going to happen – that graveling?
D: Because I’ve seen it before.
And he was right.  I’m bad luck.
 
(With Daisy’s face on the screen – mostly ---with Mason burying Ray’s body in the back yard George does a voiceover.)
 
GVO: There are things inside you that no one wants to face.
Things that you keep secret, even from yourself.
But secrets are funny.
Things that you try to hide always turn out to be the things you can’t forget.

Dead Like Me Resurrection pending

#59 Danioton

Danioton

    Viper Pilot

  • Full Members
  • Pip
  • 103 posts

Posted 02 September 2013 - 06:18 PM

Ep 213 Last Call
 
 
“I would never grow up…and I would never get old.
But, my sister……she was changing….growing taller…..moving on.
And, it was kind of comforting.
Death may have found me, but she seemed OK.” – Georgia Lass
 
“So maybe we don’t know the exact sign that tells us we will be moving on.   
But there will be a last reap.
‘Stop noticing’ that’s what Rube says 
‘That’s how you survive’
But Mason’s right.  What Rube says is ‘B*llsh*t’
You should get close to everything you care about.
Things come and go.
People come and go.
And maybe some of us learn to stop caring about it.
But I keep reaching out even though my hand keeps getting slapped away.
When my sister was little she used to close her eyes every time she wanted to hide.
She thought that made her disappear
When you get older you learn that closing your eyes just makes it darker.
You have to face everything…even death, if you want to grow up.”  - Georgia Lass
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
 
A lot is going on within this second of the last four episodes.  The writers had to contend with some conflicting needs.  One is the pressure (likely) from the top to review basics of the DLM universe.  This late in the second season would seem to be very late, but then I first watched these episodes in quick succession on DVD and the first viewers on Showtime had to see them with week long gaps.  These episodes are not stand alone and many people don’t get it even when seen from the beginning, so I’m skeptical of appeals attempting to pull in new viewers this late.  Not a strong point for any series especially at a time when means to catch up on past episodes were not as plentiful as today.  Anyway.  A second is that the writers were aware of the need to provide some closure with these last few episodes, even as they – three – needed to set up for a third season should that come to pass.  
 
We get a lot of time spent on finishing up the Ray arc, which is really the Mason/Daisy relationship arc, which is really the Daisy arc.  Daisy is very important to these writers being the only one of the main characters that wholly belongs to them and not Fuller, and so they do not disappoint (themselves or us) spending a lot of effort in bringing her to a resting place.
 
And of course George is given plenty of time along with Rube and Reggie as they are the core of the series and would have remained so in any third season.
 
And the Lass family is going thru yet another trauma as JD dies.  JD was given to the family and in particular Reggie as part of George’s attempt to support her family thru the aftermath of her own death.  It did have many positive effects, but it left them open to this shock when JD’s life ends violently and suddenly – a replay of George’s.  In this episode Reggie can’t face her own responsibility in events leading to JD’s end and blames another.  George is also in shock but recovers quickly dropping off her frog for Reggie.  Reggie of course knows who left the frog and Joy is disturbed by her line of thinking.
 
 
George has three ‘mothers’ in the larger story.  
 
One is her biological mother – Joy – who in raising George did a lot to motivate the current George in finding herself a new future in her undead life.  As far as Joy knows George is a memory only and is dead and gone. 
 
Then there is her current ‘stepmother’ – a term applied by George herself to Roxy (in S1 when she introduced Roxy to Charlotte), who is not the huggable type however close she and Rube may or may not be in private.  But we are reminded again and again that Roxy fills a sort of mother role in this reaper family.  To Roxy George’s nature is well understood but she is the one George hides the ‘normal’ stuff from e.g. the details of her boyfriend Trip.
 
And finally there is Delores.  George’s true nature is hidden from Delores, but in many ways George is emotionally dependent on Delores even as Delores has grown very dependent on George. Delores knows about Trip and it was Delores who bailed George out of jail – stepmother Roxy took the hard love approach, whereas it was Delores who listened and was ready with some useful words of wisdom for her ‘daughter’.  And then it was George who when Murray was near death helped support Delores with some needed words – even if the two were talking past each other (last episode of S1).  In this episode we’re shown that these two lean on and watch out for each other, but there isn’t time to find a resting place for this foundation relationship.  The mother figure role of Delores will take an odd twist in the next episode.
 
The all important issue of her family is complex and not resolvable, but here we get some continuation of George’s thinking about her parents and most especially, Reggie.  Like the girl in ‘The Lovely Bones’ (TLB) both sides - the dead soul in and looking on from Heaven, and the family here on Earth -will move on even as each side has not forgotten the other.  The difference in this story and in this DLM universe, is that for this dead girl the phrase ‘moving on’ is purely a mental exercise given she still resides nearby and will likely still be around long after each member of her family dies and goes into their lights.  This Fuller created aspect of the DLM universe has potential simply not available to TLB (a potential that remains unexplored).
 
In the prior episode George has this to say about her family and it could have been taken right out of TLB:
 
“I guess Death makes everything grow cold.
I hadn’t been thinking about Reggie at all lately,
Or my Mom….or my Dad.
I hadn’t been thinking about them at all.
And, I bet they weren’t thinking about me.”
 
But then she adds this, which is pure DLM:
 
“Either way, my afterlife was a secret.
Anything else was just too dangerous.”
 
George is physically near her family and whether to interact with them and at what level is a real issue.  Under Rube’s influence and with her maturing she comes to understand that probably less is more and she’s staying away.  For some reason not really made clear (we can guess – perhaps the writers prefer we each provide our own imagined reasons) her afterlife must remain a secret.  Flings with the living and the living knowing about reapers are dangerous directions, as we’ve been told many times.  And the writers go to a lot of trouble to put this into our heads.  
 
The most up front recent pathway into our heads is Daisy’s disastrous fling with Ray, which altho it may have brought Mason and Daisy closer, the means – Ray’s unscheduled murder – may not have been the healthiest basis for a future together.  In this episode Ray – now a graveling – a seriously p*ssed graveling – is stalking Daisy and Mason.  The secret starts leaking as first Roxy figures out that they probably killed him and then George finds out.  Roxy is a reaper first and the ‘mother’ to the gang and she decides to let the matter go.  There is a nice scene with Kiffany in which the family idea is pushed as perhaps a reminder to the audience as to why the tough as nails Roxy would make that choice on behalf of Mason – someone she doesn’t really respect.  Kiffany – as someone who sees them everyday over decades is used to tell us that this gang is a family – she reminds Roxy that ‘you don’t get to pick your family’.  Roxy here lets this Ray secret slide.  It’s George, in the next episode, who will act on this knowledge  - that the Rayling is out to harm two members of her reaper family – to end the danger.
 
A more subtle comment by the writers is built into the long scene near the beginning in the Waffle Haus, which is brimming over with detail – especially on our two main arcs and main characters – but also on this idea on the danger in that nexus between reapers and the living.  The core of that long and complex scene is that Rube discovers Clancy and Reggie having breakfast in the Waffle Haus almost next to the sacred reaper booth, and before George arrives from her early morning reap of the cadet he moves his gang to the other side of the Waffle Haus in a spontaneous gamble that he can prevent an accidental meeting between George/Millie and Clancy/Reggie.  The two camps walk by each other – Rube succeeds – but what exactly did he prevent? What would have happened if they did see each other?  This is left ambiguous, but it comes across that it is important to Rube that the casual meeting not happen.  The contrast is perhaps deliberately made when Rube himself engages in small talk with Clancy and Reggie making very direct eye contact and there is no recognition.  This is also after Clancy forces eye contact with Daisy, when she goes to the restroom, to say ‘Good Morning’ – no doubt responding to the same sexual charisma that Mason can’t resist, which Reggie notices and finds off putting.  Reggie got an extended close up look at both Rube and Daisy in the episode in which the Komodo dragon met his end, and here she does not express any evidence of recognition.  So why is Rube so concerned about a casual walk by between them and George?  The writers take the time to make sure we know he is concerned.  This Clancy/Reggie aspect to the scene was not necessary to move the episode along and was probably placed here as a sort of exercise for the audience for the more meaningful and actionable run-in later when Reggie takes notice and acts on that recognition probably in combination with something else that stimulates her thinking.
 
When George does check back on her family after some time away, prodded by Mason’s words at Happy Time, we get some insight into her maturing views on the need to follow their separate paths even as she appreciates that Reggie has escaped her own fate.
 
“I would never grow up…and I would never get old.
But, my sister……she was changing….growing taller…..moving on.
And, it was kind of comforting.
Death may have found me, but she seemed OK.”
 
However, the reason our George has gone back to check up on her family is that Mason is in the midst of a genuine existential crisis – he gets a purple postit and takes it as a sign that this next reap is to be his last, that he will get his lights.  This in turn motivates him to accelerate his fuzzy plans for Daisy.  He overhears her that morning say she would have liked an engagement ring, so he spends much of his last day getting the money together to buy her that ring.  
 
This arc is really centered on Daisy with Mason bending as needed once again.  George’s early morning reap of the cadet is used to lead into one part of the opening long and complex ‘booth’ scene at the Waffle Haus which sets up a wistful comment from each reaper as to what they would have wanted on their last day.  For Daisy it would have been an engagement ring.  This is all a set up for that scene later in this episode in which Mason brings the ring to the very drunk and prostrate and vulnerable Daisy on the couch at the reaper house.
 
Daisy’s last thought before she died we learned in S1 was a plaintive wondering why no one had ever really loved her.  Mason uses what he believes to be his last day on Earth to first get the money for and then buy that engagement ring, which he presents to Daisy, and which she declines.  
 
“It’s a token. Daisy, it’s a token from me - from my heart to you –you.  It’s something permanent in this bloody world.”  - Mason
 
“Mason, I’m not this girl.
I won’t fall in love.
I won’t get married.  
I won’t grow old with someone….not with you or anyone.
So I don’t want your ring.” – Daisy Adair
 
Note that later in this episode and a later one, Daisy may have declined the ring but she kept it. We’ll see her trying it on in private and then deciding to wear it on a chain hidden around her neck.  That Mason would do this for her, finally, means a lot to Daisy.  Mason decided to do this on his own and without any prompting or manipulation from her.  
 
She will never get married and won’t ever grow old with anyone, but maybe she can fall in love or more importantly maybe someone can really fall in love with her.  The ring gives her some sort of hope.
 
And this scene lets us see a little of the dark side of the reaper existence - that Groundhog Day aspect.  They have a hundred years – blank years thrown at them with no directions provided.  A living person has so much to distract them with half that many years.  First there’s the growing up, then the preoccupation with finding the right other, raising a family, the growing old, and finally facing the unknown on the other side.  Reapers don’t have any of this to distract them.  They still have their biological urges etc, but what for?  They know there’s something after, but not why they were kept back or what they’re supposed to do to get ready.  Daisy seems to have figured this out at an intuitive level and is not handling it well.  
 
Interestingly, Mason, when faced with what he believes is his chance to cross over in this episode (the purple postit), falls apart.  After his reap at the episode end finds him still here, there’s a scene with him in a boat finding something new to do with his time – maybe progressing just a little – and calling to mind a similar scene (ep 110 ‘Unfinished Business) with the newly minted George reaper pushing her purgatory boundaries for a bit of sailing substituting a trip off at some Caribbean island that would have been outside those boundaries.
 
George is working through how to balance her reaper existence – she’s not one of the living with its distractions and challenges that give purpose to life and living, and she’s not one of the crossed over dead whom she has to escort everyday.  Reapers are in a purgatory of sorts left to find their own way.  She is finding her way to face her reaper life keeping her eyes open facing the bad.  Each reaper has to find their own way, and sometimes changes in direction (and I’m thinking of how Rube -under George’s influence -goes to his daughter at her death). 
 
In the next episode the writers hand us the key to understanding the Daisy character – one small indication that perhaps they suspected the end of the series was nigh – by having her identify with Blanche DuBois the aging but still pretty and very delusional main character of ‘A Streetcar Named Desire’.  I recommend watching the 1951 movie starring Vivien Leigh (who also starred in ‘Gone With The Wind’ from 1939) and Marlon Brando.  I mention it here ahead of the next episode when Daisy brings it up because it also helps us to understand her relationship with Mason and how to interpret the non reaper non DLM universe aspects of Mason’s offer of the engagement ring.  
 
I’ll just mention a few of the more obvious comparisons.  George is sort of a stand in for Blanche’s younger sister Stella, who is not as attractive as her older sister and who perhaps because of that has a more down to earth practical grip on reality compared to her older sibling.  Stella repeatedly has to tell Blanch how pretty she is – very much like George did in the opening booth scene of S2 for Daisy.  Stella describes Blanche as ‘fresh as a daisy’ early in the movie.  The woman who plays Blanche – a woman obsessed with her own looks and who is constantly powdering her nose, looking in a mirror to freshen her make up, and monopolizes the only bathroom in a small apartment – is Vivien Leigh, who some 12 years prior was the young fresh star of the GWTW movie made in 1939 – the year our Daisy died on the set of the same movie.  As the movie progresses we learn that while Blanche has in fact had many ‘relationships’ with men her characterization of these interactions is filtered thru some serious self delusion.  In DLM and in Daisy’s case this sort of self delusional mischaracterization is there but it’s made so over the top that it is never allowed to become the downer it edges into for Blanche and the audience in the movie.  
 
The more important comparison (vs Mason) to point out concerns the character Mitch (Karl Malden) in that movie.  Mitch is a bit delusional himself and has his own flaws, but for Blanche his most important trait is that he is totally defenseless when faced with her brand of charming charisma.  Blanche is a bit pretentious and conceited about her looks in particular but also what she believes is her higher social standing.   Mitch seems to suspect all is not what it seems but he can’t help being drawn to Blanche and he soon proposes marriage.  Blanche who is nearing the end of her looks – she lies to Mitch about her age – sees him as her last bit of hope to save herself from a very bad end – and grabs desperately for and cultivates Mitch’s delusions.
 
The writers modeled Daisy after Blanche and Mason echoes some of Mitch’s traits and certainly his role vs Blanche.  Daisy as flawed as she is was lucky to have died in her prime at age 24.  As Blanche’s beauty faded her sanity unraveled bit by bit.  Neither Daisy nor George will ever grow old and for Daisy perhaps her delusions, at least those anchored in her sexual charisma, are safe until she crosses over.  
 
With a third season along with the evolution of the George/Rube/Reggie triangle we would have had lots of attention focused on Daisy’s growth or lack thereof.  There’s that Groundhog Day aspect to Daisy that is intriguing – that she could die in 1939 and still have that Blanche like reliance on her looks to get by for 60+ years.  In our DLM story George for example has grown more as far as self-awareness, maturing, etc in one year than Daisy it seems in those 60+ years.

Dead Like Me Resurrection pending

#60 Danioton

Danioton

    Viper Pilot

  • Full Members
  • Pip
  • 103 posts

Posted 02 September 2013 - 06:27 PM

Ep 213 Last Call (continued)
 
 
(00) (Opens with some key parts of the Ray/Daisy/Mason arc from prior episodes.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(1) (George is standing on the grounds of a military academy where she will reap the young female cadet.)
 
GVO: When I was alive, I never bought the whole straighten-up and fly-right routine.  I hated being told what to do.  So it’s pretty strange that now my job is to give everyone else their marching orders.
 
(George is walking around, observing the cadets run their obstacle course, wearing a sweat suit while carrying a coffee.)
 
Sure I wanted to be a superhero when I was a kid.  But only the guy superheroes got cool costumes with massive capes and scary masks and stuff.  All Wonder Woman got were hooker boots and a bathing suit.  What the f*&k was that about?
 
Ahhh, the gentle art of poetry.
 
(And we see/hear that George’s reap is a female cadet named Monteleone faced with rope climbing a very tall wall, which hasn’t yet been climbed by any female cadet.)
 
She’s feisty that one.  I’m kinda rooting for her.
 
(And, the girl succeeds in getting to the top where she meets a graveling and her demise.
 
In the post death conversation between George and Monteleone the writers take the time to make a few points about reapers and what they can or cannot do.  This late in the second season this wouldn’t seem to be an issue, but perhaps there was some sort of focus group feedback and/or the suits were busy writing notes ‘to make things better’, so the writers were reinforcing the basics due to some direction from higher ups.  
 
George is wearing a sweat suit and so perhaps the super laid back attitude she exudes in this scene was by design and intentionally encouraged by the director (?) However it came about this scene is not Ms Muth’s best of the two seasons and the way she plays George here pretty much falls flat.  At one point she even seems to look into the camera.)
 
Montelione: Did you kill me?
George: No.  I took your soul before you died.
Think of me as one of Death’s little Lieutenants.
M: So.  You’re dead too?
G: Dead and buried.
So how’d you end up in this place?  You burned your parents’ house down?
M: I had to ace 4 tests to get in here.
I was selected.
G: Well, I was selected, too.
M: Why?
G: I don’t know.
 
(As they walk away together)
 
M: So. Do you have any superpowers?
Can you fly?
G: No. No flying. No leaping of buildings.  No climbing walls.  But we can drink as much tequila as we want without getting hung over.)
M: That’s pretty cool.
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(5) (At the Waffle Haus we get a long evolving scene with several subparts.   
 
First we see just Daisy and Mason in a close early morning huddle reviewing their ‘story’ regarding Ray and Daisy – specifically what happened to Ray.  Of the two Daisy is the more practiced liar, and it’s clear with the secret depending on Mason its life expectancy is not high.  Daisy’s story will be she just dumped Ray – The End.  Mason can’t help interjecting that he was bowling while Ray was being murdered.  As Mason seems to begin a breakdown right there Daisy gets annoyed and needs to put some distance between them.  She heads off to fix her makeup.
 
As Daisy gets up and walks to the restroom she passes by a booth with Clancy and Reggie eating breakfast.  Clancy seeks eye contact with Daisy as she passes to say ‘Good Morning’ to her.  Daisy is unimpressed and Reggie is put off  - ‘Eew’ – by her father’s behavior.  If Reggie remembers Daisy (from Ep 208 ‘The Escape Artist’) she shows no indication. This early morning booth scene brings to mind the ‘Sunday Morning’ episode and Clancy’s relationship with young George, who gets pulled into this current conversation when Clancy brings up George’s coffee drinking habits and Reggie remembers how she drank it.  George is still on their minds.
 
Roxy followed closely by Rube enter.  Rube pauses in front of the Clancy/Reggie booth and asks them about the coffee.  He knows who they are, but Clancy does not know him.  Does Reggie remember Rube?  She doesn’t show any recognition, which is odd given Rube’s prominent position a few episodes ago (ep 208) as a sub teacher when the Komodo dragon met its end.  
 
Clancy and Reggie are getting their check to leave.  Rube is standing over the reaper booth mulling the situation.  After some prodding from Roxy (why hovering?) he announces that they will move and takes the group (Rube, Mason, and Roxy with Daisy still in the restroom) over to the far side of the restaurant in order to avoid a meeting between Clancy and Reggie and George/Millie, who is due at any minute.
 
Why does Rube care and what is he afraid might happen?  Is he concerned about a reaction from Clancy/Reggie at seeing Millie? Or, is he concerned about George’s reaction at seeing Clancy/Reggie?
 
The writers contrived this scene – this almost meeting  – in order to highlight Rube’s concern that it not happen.  
 
Rube is very aware of the fact that George is residing so near to her family and he is preoccupied with keeping them as far apart as possible. Given the audience knows a lot about Reggie’s state of mind regarding George’s still being around, but Rube knows little if anything as to Reggie’s thoughts, it’s unlikely that Rube is acting out of anything other than an abundance of caution as he moves from the sacred reaper booth to an uncomfortable table.
 
With the three at the table Mason is approaching a spontaneous breakdown over innocent questions because he is so stressed over his night before murder of Ray.  He spits coffee all over the table and Rube’s jeans.  From this table and where Rube is sitting Rube has a clear view of the main entrance and when he sees George enter he immediately calls her attention bringing her directly to the table.  As she focuses on Rube and walks toward him, she misses seeing Clancy and Reggie who walk just behind her to the cash register.  Rube’s maneuver succeeds.
 
As the gang gathers and with Daisy’s return Mason’s nerves continue to fray and he gets thrown further off balance when only he gets a purple postit – for the guy at the lake.  Rube departs.
 
The remaining reapers discuss what they would’ve done on their last day before dying if they knew it was coming – Daisy mentions here she would have gotten engaged and received a pretty little diamond ring for her finger.
 
George noticed the mud in the house – from Mason after he buried Ray’s body in the backyard – and asks Daisy/Mason about it, which unsettles Mason more.)
 
GVO: Nothing lasts forever.  This was a lesson I learned over and over again.
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(12) (George arriving for the morning at Happy Time sees Delores preparing for a goodbye party for Brian.)
 
GVO: At Happy Time, at a temp agency, people definitely come and go.  In fact most days you can’t swing a dead cat without hitting a f&^king goodbye party.
 
(The nymphomaniac, Misty, makes another appearance and exits with Brian leaving Delores and George.  Delores brings up her possible date and her worry about getting so far along in life and looking back with regrets about ‘What ifs’.)
 
GVO: As in ‘What if you went out to lunch one day and never came back’?  It was almost enough to make you understand the stupid fuss over goodbye parties……..almost.
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(14) (Roxy drags Mason along to her reaping of a bus load of ‘Sea Turtle’ team boosters.  While Roxy is in the bus reaping, Mason smells the bus driver on the other side getting high.  Roxy interrogates Mason on the breakup with Ray.  Mason tells her Daisy dumped Ray for Mason, which she finds hard to believe – but actually may have some truth to it.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(16) (Reggie at home with JD in a scene entry lifted right out of the movie ‘Risky Business’.  The neighbor lady, Claire, notices Reggie is home alone and checks in on her.  While they’re talking JD eats chocolate ice cream – almost his last meal.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(17) (Delores, Crystal, and George are in the conference room discussing party preparations and Brian enters the room and tells Delores how much he appreciates the party.  George doesn’t trust Brian.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(19) (At the Waffle Haus, Mason, nervous about his purple postit, is trying to persuade Kiffany, who he believes is ‘psychotic’ i.e. psychic, to read his palm.  For reasons unknown the writers throw in plenty of hints that in fact Kiffany does have some supernatural abilities.  Mason fails to get the reassurance he wants and he starts seeing real and imagined signs that this might really be his last day as a reaper.  Given Mason’s opinion expressed in the past how terrible his reaper situation is – look at what God did to us comment – it’s surprising he’s so upset that this might be his last day i.e. that he finally might be allowed to pass into his lights.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(20) (At the reaper house we see Daisy reading a fashion magazine when Roxy shows up with questions about Ray.  ‘She’s smart’ as Daisy will say later and she’s figured out that there’s a hole or two or three in mostly Mason’s account as to what happened between Ray and Daisy.  She has brought Ray’s police file to show to Daisy and she tells Daisy she’s following up on a missing person report for Ray.  Roxy notices the blood on the rug from Ray.  She seems to put things together but decides to drop the matter and leaves, much to Daisy’s relief.  In this clash between Roxy’s reaper and police identities, the reaper won out.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(22) (At Happy Time the party is just getting underway.  George leaves to get Brian and finds him stealing cash from Delores’ wallet.  George tackles him.)
 
GVO: I don’t know why I had such a big bug up my &ss about Brian’s farewell party.  Maybe it’s because I was regretting my own last day.  Maybe it’s because……he was stealing Delores’ wallet.
 
(George tackles the fleeing Brian and beats the ***** out of him.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(24) (Reggie let JD eat all the chocolate ice cream.  He throws it up and Reggie puts him outside.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(24) (Mason is holding a yard sale on someone else’s lawn, when the owner shows up.  He flees.  Mason is trying to raise money for……?  This is probably where mason gets the money for Daisy’s engagement ring.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(26) (The farewell party proceeds without Brian.  Delores and George are left alone and Delores worries about someday having to bake a cake for George’s departure.)
 
GVO: I was beginning to understand why we mark every coming and going with a party.
We do it to sugar coat the whole moving on thing.  I mean…..why say an actual good-bye to someone when it’s so much easier to just eat cake?
 
(George returns to her cubicle to find Mason eating some of that good-bye cake reminding us that this may be Mason’s last day.  And we have Mason delivering the title (Last Call), some key lines, and message for this episode.  Mason is used to get George thinking about her own family again and we learn what her current state of mind is regarding her progress along this central theme concern.  Notice how brotherly Mason treats George on what he thinks is his last day.  Mason’s message is to ignore what Rube has been saying about staying away from those that have been important to her, to take advantage of this last chance – the last call – to go for it while she still can.)
 
George: Why are you here?
Mason: I came to see your lovely face.
G: I have work to do Mason.  What do you need? Money?
M: Of course, I need money.  But….that’s not why I’m here.
G: For what?  Drugs? Booze? Drugs and booze?
M: No, Actually, I want…..
G: Seriously, Mason, you’re not supposed to be here, so…Go Away!
M: God.
 
Actually, you know what?  I’m going to stay.  And I want to say something to you, and you gotta listen.  Please.
You know?  This morning when you said you spent your last day on Earth….your very very last day on Earth stapling?
G: Filing.
M: My God!  That’s even worse.
You said you regretted it, didn’t you?
G: Of course, who gives a sh&t?
M: By God, I give a sh8t.  Rube tells us to be on the periphery.  To keep away from…things…to keep our distance ….from life…our family….
G: Yeah?
M: God! It’s nonsense.  You get close.  George, you get close to everybody that ever meant anything to you.
G: Have you been drinking?
M: Of course, I’ve bloody been drinking, and it’s last call….and you gotta….you gotta drink up while you still can.  
 
(He kisses George.)
 
I really love you Georgie.
It’s gonna be all right.
Come on.  Let’s go for a ride.
 
GVO: I don’t know exactly what Mason was talking about.
Why he said I should get close to people?
Why he….told me he loved me?
 Maybe it was just the booze talking ----
 
(We see Mason conducting a transaction just outside the Waffle Haus.)
 
--- “in vino veritas”.
 
(George entering the elevator at Happy Time)
 
I just knew it was time to check in with my old life.
 
(George forgot about her family and now reminded by Mason she’s heading back to see what’s happening with her family.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(29) (In the alley beside the Lass house we see Reggie calling JD’s name.)
 
GVO: I knew it was time to go home.
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(30) (After some heavy drinking, which is still in progress, we see Daisy prostrate on the couch looking a bit worn and drunk, but still presentable, when we hear Mason’s knock at the door.  And Daisy gets to tell us more of the episode’s message on reapers and their predicament.)
 
Daisy: I’m not here.
Mason: Well that’s strange.  I can hear your voice my darling.
D: You can’t hear me.  You’re hearing voices in your head.
M: That my dear is so bloody true it’s scary.
G: Not today, Mason.
M: Well, today….. is the day it has to be, I’m afraid.
(Mason enters and seeing her bottle of booze….)
Can I have a drink? Thanks.
D: Roxy knows about Ray
M: Sh*t…..how the h*ll does she know?
D: She’s smart.   I think she knows something.   I think …someone ....knows something.
M: I don’t bloody care.   The deed is done.
D:  You should care, Mason …It’s a death without a postit – we’ve let loose some kind of evil.
M: All right, Daisy.
(He hugs her.)
Look at me.
I did it.  And you didn’t.
D: Well, someone’s gonna pay.
M: You’re so beautiful to look at.
D: And unlucky to know.
 
(Mason shows ring in case/box)
D: That’s an engagement ring.
M: Ya.   You wanted one so I got it for you.  You wanted to put it on your little finger on your last day.  So, here it is.
D: Are you trying to humiliate me?
M: No – never.  It’s a token. Daisy, it’s a token from me - from my heart to you –you.  It’s something permanent in this bloody world.
D: Mason, I’m not this girl.
I won’t fall in love.
I won’t get married.  
I won’t grow old with someone….not with you or anyone.
 
So I don’t want your ring.
 
M: And I will never ever take it back.
 
D: Please go.
 
(And this scene represents Laura as Daisy’s best of the two seasons.  It lets us see a little of the dark side of the Reaper existence - that Groundhog Day aspect.  They have a hundred years – blank years thrown at them with no directions provided.  A living person has so much to distract them with half that many years.  First there’s the growing up, then the preoccupation with finding the right other, raising a family, the growing old, and finally facing the unknown on the other side.  Reapers don’t have any of this to distract them.  They still have their biological urges etc, but what for?  They know there’s something after, but not why they were kept back or what they’re supposed to do to get ready.  Daisy seems to have figured this out at an intuitive level and is not handling it well.  Interestingly, Mason, when faced with what he believes is his chance to cross over in this episode (the purple postit), falls apart emotionally.  After his reap at the episode end there’s a scene with him in a boat finding something new to do with his time – maybe progressing just a little – and calling to mind a similar scene with newly minted George reaper pushing her purgatory boundaries for a bit of sailing substituting a trip off at some Caribbean island that would be outside those boundaries.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(33) (George is spying on Reggie just before either realizes JD is already dead in the street.  George, the newest of the reapers, is making progress on her own journey of self-realization.  She’s coming to some wisdom with regard to her own fate and death, and her concern for Reggie.  She’s getting to the point where she’ll be able to move on.)
 
GVO: I would never grow up…and I would never get old.
But, my sister……she was changing….growing taller…..moving on.
And, it was kind of comforting.
 
Death may have found me, but she seemed OK.
 
(But there’s a relapse.  After she finds out of JD’s death, the voiceover continues)
 
I shouldn’t have come here…...This was all my fault.
 
(All her fault in the sense that if she hadn’t gotten re-involved with Reggie and family and not given them JD…but also re-affirmation of what Rube was telling her … don’t interfere and don’t go back to family.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(34) (Mason is at the Waffle Haus with his purple postit at the reaper booth, alone, preparing himself for what he believes is his last reap.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(35) (George enters the house, sits down in front of the still drunk Daisy.)
 
George: My dog died.
Daisy: You don’t have a dog.
G: My family’s dog died.
D: You don’t have a family.
G: Oh, shut-up Daisy.
D: It’s just um….It’s that kind of day.
So your dog died.
G: I don’t even know why I went back home.
Because Mason told me to.
D: You shouldn’t listen to Mason.  Mason doesn’t know anything.
G: It’s all my fault.
D: I don’t think it is.
G: Well then, whose fault is it?
D: Probably mine.
(The Rayling makes an appearance.)
G: What is that?
D: Go away!
Ray, go away!
G: Daisy, why is there a graveling?
D: Mason killed Ray.
G: So, Mason had his postit?
D: No one had a postit.  There was no postit.  And bad things have been happening today, and it’s all my fault, so I’m sorry about your dog, babe. It’s my fault.
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(36) (Clancy is consoling Reggie over JD’s death.  Reggie tells Clancy that Claire left the gate open.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(37) (Mason breaks thru some undergrowth to find his reap camping at an isolated lake.  His reap  - Bret  - is friendly and invites Mason to fireside dinner, and Mason has a talk with Bret including telling him about reaping and his impending death.)
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(39) (Roxy is at the reaper booth at the Waffle Haus reviewing Ray’s police file.  Kiffany comes up and their brief dialogue affirms another central idea as to how we are to view our reaper Waffle Haus gang.  Kiffany complains about Mason’s recent behavior to Roxy.)
 
Kiffany: I don’t know how you do it.
Roxy: Do what?
K: Your job.  The scrawny one.  He committed a lewd act today.
R: On who?
K: A perfectly innocent coconut cake.
R: I’ll take care of it.
K: Well….you know what they say.
You don’t get to pick your family.
R: No.
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(40) (At the lake Mason is going into detail about his reaper duties with Bret  - before he dies.  Perhaps Mason is assuming that Bret will replace him? They take a last swim together.)
 
Mason: Whatever happens to you tonight, Mate, you will not feel a thing.  So don’t be afraid.
Bret: I’m not afraid.  I just don’t know what to hope for.
M: Hope for another shot at it. A chance to do it all f&^king unafraid.
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(42) (Next morning at the Waffle Haus at the booth Rube and Roxy are discussing Ray.  The family gathers one by one.)
 
Rube: So what’s the deal with this guy? You think he’s gone?
Roxy: He’s gone.  Trust me.
Rube: I do not mind saying that I did not like this guy.
Roxy: I’m thinking you’ll never have to see him again.
(Daisy sits)
Daisy: Never have to see who, again?
Roxy: Ray.  He was last seen in Portland.
D: Portland?
Rube: So you’re off the hook, aren’t you, Daisy?
D: What does that mean?
Rube: No more Ray to worry about.
D: Ya.  That’s right.  No more Ray.
(George enters pushing a reluctant Roxy over to get some sitting room.)
George: Morning.
Rube: Why the face?
G: Leave me alone.
D: Her family dog died.
Rube: Oh, I’m sorry.
G: Thanks.
Rube: I’d ask you how you know that, but…
G: But you won’t.
Rube: Maybe I’ll ask you tomorrow.
G: Tomorrow.
(Mason plops down pushing George over.)
Rube: You look like you’re at death’s door.
How’d your reap go?
Mason: Swimmingly.  Lake.  Man. Lightning.  Gone in an instant.
D: Better him than you.
M: Do you really think so?
D: I do.
 
(Those last three lines could be taken a few different ways.  Mason asks about the purple postit and Rube says they were out of yellow, and then he leaves.)
 
D: You should thank Roxy.
M: Really, why?
D: Just thank her.
M: Thank you.
Roxy: You’re welcome.
D: (to Roxy) Would you give me a ride to my reap?
Roxy: Sure. But you have to sit in the back.
D: OK.
(as Daisy is leaving with Roxy, she touches Mason)
I’ll talk to you.
 
(This leaves the brother and sister in the booth.  Mason asks for a little help and George, patting his head, tells him she’ll take care of him.  This takes us back to the S1 scene in which Mason counseled a much younger George regarding Rube’s fulminations over her latest screw up.)
 
George Voiceover: So maybe we don’t know the exact sign that tells us we will be moving on.   
But there will be a last reap.
 
(We see Daisy – alone at home – testing the feel of the engagement ring Mason gave her.  It means more to her than she will admit to anyone maybe more than she understands.)
 
‘Stop noticing’ that’s what Rube says 
‘That’s how you survive’
But Mason’s right.  What Rube says is ‘B*llsh*t’
You should get close to everything you care about.
 
(Clancy is leaving the house and finds the back yard gate open.)
 
Things come and go.
 
People come and go.
 
And maybe some of us learn to stop caring about it.
 
(And we get a shot of Mason at the lake in a boat trying fly fishing.)
 
But I keep reaching out even though my hand keeps getting slapped away.
 
(George carrying a box with her gold frog walks up the stairs of the Lass house.  She rings the doorbell, leaves the box, and departs.  She tried giving JD.  Now she will try again by giving Reggie her precious gold frog.)
 
When my sister was little she used to close her eyes every time she wanted to hide.
She thought that made her disappear.
 
When you get older you learn that closing your eyes just makes it darker.
 
You have to face everything…even death, if you want to grow up.
 
(George is working through how to balance her reaper existence – she’s not one of the living with its distractions and challenges that give purpose to life and living, and she’s not one of the crossed over dead whom she has to escort everyday.  Reapers are in a purgatory of sorts left to find their own way.  She finding her way to face her reaper life keeping her eyes open facing the bad.  Each reaper has to find their own way, and sometimes changes in direction (and I’m thinking of how Rube -under George’s influence -goes to his daughter at her death).  Mason’s tries to hide with drugs and booze.  Daisy is struggling, experimenting. )

Dead Like Me Resurrection pending




1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users